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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [cmscat50] [ In reply to ]
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cmscat50 wrote:
Any idea what tire width and pressure Sebi is running? Or what they are running in the pro peloton for pressures?

Re: Sebi - I don't have that info. With the pro peloton, 25mm tires are basically the new minimum size for both road and TT... with probably an exception or two. More 28's are showing up. I don't have a lot of pressure info because they tend to be fairly secretive, so I asked my buddy Dan Cavallari over at Velonews who spends a lot of time covering EU races. He said that they still tend to err on the high side (which sounds to me like a carryover from the old days of running realllllly high pressure on narrow tires). Anyhow, Dan said that he doesn't think that anyone is running over 85-90psi on 28's, which sounds high to me. I normally run about 72psi front, 75 rear on 28's and I'm a fatty @ about 200 lbs (been lifting weights and stuff). I never pinch flat. Dan weighs about 10 lbs less than me and said he runs 75-80 because he prefers a bit firmer feel. I run about 80-85 on 25s... and I never ride 23's anymore.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks for the thread,

I still ride tubulars mostly in training and racing, so the maintenance issues or time are largely irrelevant to me.

My concerns are basically safety related, what are the issues with blow offs or burping tires?

Are they largely exaggerated perhaps from early systems which are not as robust or refined as current?

Thanks for starting this,

Maurice
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [mauricemaher] [ In reply to ]
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mauricemaher wrote:
Thanks for the thread,

I still ride tubulars mostly in training and racing, so the maintenance issues or time are largely irrelevant to me.

My concerns are basically safety related, what are the issues with blow offs or burping tires?

Are they largely exaggerated perhaps from early systems which are not as robust or refined as current?

Thanks for starting this,

Maurice

Honestly, I haven't heard of many issues with road tubeless in terms of blow-offs or burping. Burping is usually caused by low pressures and hard cornering - i.e. MTB. And blowoffs, I can't think of any horror stories either. The only tubeless blow-off I've experienced was about 8-10 years ago, using an original Hutchinson Bulldog CX tire which had SUPER stiff carbon beads, on a Stan's Arch 29er rim. Those rims were kind of designed to be used with non-tubeless tires set up tubeless, with a very high bead shelf. During installation I had to use an air compressor to blast the tire in place, and as the beads were forced up onto the shelf, there was a loud BANG as one of the beads failed, and I got showered in sealant.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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gregk wrote:
mauricemaher wrote:
Thanks for the thread,

I still ride tubulars mostly in training and racing, so the maintenance issues or time are largely irrelevant to me.

My concerns are basically safety related, what are the issues with blow offs or burping tires?

Are they largely exaggerated perhaps from early systems which are not as robust or refined as current?

Thanks for starting this,

Maurice

Honestly, I haven't heard of many issues with road tubeless in terms of blow-offs or burping. Burping is usually caused by low pressures and hard cornering - i.e. MTB. And blowoffs, I can't think of any horror stories either. The only tubeless blow-off I've experienced was about 8-10 years ago, using an original Hutchinson Bulldog CX tire which had SUPER stiff carbon beads, on a Stan's Arch 29er rim. Those rims were kind of designed to be used with non-tubeless tires set up tubeless, with a very high bead shelf. During installation I had to use an air compressor to blast the tire in place, and as the beads were forced up onto the shelf, there was a loud BANG as one of the beads failed, and I got showered in sealant.

Thanks,

Largely what I want to hear or want to be true is that when I leave the front door with a tubeless set up (properly) that I will be basically at the same risk as clincher or any other properly set up system. Would this be a reasonable thought?

In terms of maintenance, I don’t really see a big deal. We can convert someone from tubed to fully tubeless in about 15-20 minutes. Includes cleaning, new tape (always stans, use a heated skewer to puncture valve hole) new valves etc.

Road adoption has been extremely slow though.

Maurice
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [mauricemaher] [ In reply to ]
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mauricemaher wrote:
Largely what I want to hear or want to be true is that when I leave the front door with a tubeless set up (properly) that I will be basically at the same risk as clincher or any other properly set up system. Would this be a reasonable thought?

In my view, with current technology - yes.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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gregk wrote:

If you're suggesting that you can run a standard clincher tire and convert it to tubeless, this is not true, and dangerous. Road pressures are MUCH higher and you cannot convert a non-TLR road tire to tubeless. The home page article I referenced covers this.

Now, I'm sure someone out there has converted a non-tubeless road tire to tubeless without crashing, but it is absolutely not recommended. In theory the thinner casings of the non-TLR tires would be more supple, but it isn't worth the risk. And even at that, the latest tubeless tires have gotten a lot more supple/forgiving/comfortable.

I was not suggesting using non-TLR road tyres. It was more aimed at making people aware that TLR tyres are generally stiffer.

Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike. You will get less supple tyre (esp. compared to latex tube nonTLR tyre). You do not need a grip like you do in MTB. Only gain is no pinch flats, which are easily avoidable with latex tubes.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [otebski] [ In reply to ]
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otebski wrote:
gregk wrote:


If you're suggesting that you can run a standard clincher tire and convert it to tubeless, this is not true, and dangerous. Road pressures are MUCH higher and you cannot convert a non-TLR road tire to tubeless. The home page article I referenced covers this.

Now, I'm sure someone out there has converted a non-tubeless road tire to tubeless without crashing, but it is absolutely not recommended. In theory the thinner casings of the non-TLR tires would be more supple, but it isn't worth the risk. And even at that, the latest tubeless tires have gotten a lot more supple/forgiving/comfortable.


I was not suggesting using non-TLR road tyres. It was more aimed at making people aware that TLR tyres are generally stiffer.

Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike. You will get less supple tyre (esp. compared to latex tube nonTLR tyre). You do not need a grip like you do in MTB. Only gain is no pinch flats, which are easily avoidable with latex tubes.

10-4. I wasn't 100% sure if that was your intent, so I'm glad we clarified.

On the topic of tube pinch flats, this is one that still mystifies me (i.e. that it's an issue for people). I like to run low-ish pressure and never pinch flat with any tire setup. Back when I worked in a bike shop, the pinch flats we fixed were pretty much always from people that weren't serious cyclists and forgot to inflate their tires for a long time.

My bigger concern these days isn't pinch flatting, but impacting carbon clincher rims. So I do tend to run a bit higher pressure on carbon, just for that added measure of safety.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Yikes this thread is getting long very quickly.

May I suggest you have a table of recommended sealant volumes by tire size.

Also guidelines on whether carrying a spare tube, plug kit or both is reasonable for flat repair
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [grumpier.mike] [ In reply to ]
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grumpier.mike wrote:
May I suggest you have a table of recommended sealant volumes by tire size.

Also guidelines on whether carrying a spare tube, plug kit or both is reasonable for flat repair

Sealant: It varies by sealant manufacturer, but 30-60ml (1 - 2 ounces) per tire is normal for average road tires (i.e. 23 - 32mm). Any any sealant will tell you how much to use in the instructions/package. I usually err on the high side because it delays the time I have to add more sealant.

Spare: If you're going long, a plug kit and spare tube are a good idea. I normally just carry a standard flat kit (i.e. tube, CO2, tire levers, tire boot, multi tool).

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [otebski] [ In reply to ]
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otebski wrote:
Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike.

did you read the interview with sebi? a number of us see a big plus to road TL in triathlon. however i respect the contrary view. but that established this is just like disc brakes in road and tri, 3 and 4 years ago. happy to discuss the relative merits. but we're traveling exactly the same trajectory, in a roughly similar time arc, with road TL as we did with road/tri disc brake. it's all going to happen way quicker than you thought it would, hence this thread, to help smooth the transition.

Dan Empfield
aka Slowman
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [otebski] [ In reply to ]
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otebski wrote:
Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike.

People said the same thing about disc brake on road bike several years ago. Now I see every other bike in the Tour de France has it.

The Corsa Speed TL on my bike feels pretty supple.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Slowman] [ In reply to ]
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Slowman wrote:
otebski wrote:
Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike.


did you read the interview with sebi? a number of us see a big plus to road TL in triathlon. however i respect the contrary view. but that established this is just like disc brakes in road and tri, 3 and 4 years ago. happy to discuss the relative merits. but we're traveling exactly the same trajectory, in a roughly similar time arc, with road TL as we did with road/tri disc brake. it's all going to happen way quicker than you thought it would, hence this thread, to help smooth the transition.


No I did not.
And where do you find the benefit of TL? Only one I can imagine is a slim chance to have sealed flat. You would most likely have to stop to reinflate but at least you save that 2 minutes for swapping tube. Other than that?


EDIT: just read the interview. Comparison with butyl setup is not really fair. Moreover the extra weight of TL is not in the breaker its in the sidewalls, which need to be thicker in order to avoid sealant seeping. Sidewalls being thicker offers pretty much no benefit while making the tyre noticeably less responsive.
Last edited by: otebski: Jul 24, 19 14:38
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Slowman] [ In reply to ]
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Slowman wrote:

did you read the interview with sebi?

I did but for me, I just don’t see the benefit. And the cons seem to outweigh the pros by a lot in my opinion. Perhaps the pro’s outweigh the con’s for those who have shit roads near them full of potholes where pinch flats are pretty common.

I’m actually still surprised Sebi made the switch. I could have sworn I read somewhere he was on latex tubes the past few years. If he was, then this new schwalbe setup is actually slower for him (even if the new setup wasn’t tubeless) compared to the conti proto type tire and TT’s he has been running for those years.

blog
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [otebski] [ In reply to ]
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otebski wrote:
Slowman wrote:
otebski wrote:
Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike.


did you read the interview with sebi? a number of us see a big plus to road TL in triathlon. however i respect the contrary view. but that established this is just like disc brakes in road and tri, 3 and 4 years ago. happy to discuss the relative merits. but we're traveling exactly the same trajectory, in a roughly similar time arc, with road TL as we did with road/tri disc brake. it's all going to happen way quicker than you thought it would, hence this thread, to help smooth the transition.


No I did not. And where do you find the benefit of TL? Only one I can imagine is a slim chance to have sealed flat. You would most likely have to stop to reinflate but at least you save that 2 minutes for swapping tube. Other than that?

EDIT: just read the interview. Comparison with butyl setup is not really fair. Moreover the extra weight of TL is not in the breaker its in the sidewalls, which need to be thicker in order to avoid sealant seeping. Sidewalls being thicker offers pretty much no benefit while making the tyre noticeably less responsive.

obviously your editorialized view of the effectiveness of sealant differs from sebi's. it also appears you've made a decision, so, no real need to continue the discussion, is there? this thread exists to help people across the transition to TL, as absolutely (in my opinion) will happen, just as we've tried to do the same here for disc brakes. even those pro triathletes who're not moving to schwalbe are moving in fair numbers to conti TL. and i think hutchinson will have something to say about it.

this isn't to say that TL has displaced and surpassed latex/tubed. it's that we're now at a moment of parity and, just like disc brakes, once you're at that point, there's only one direction that i can see this going.

Dan Empfield
aka Slowman
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [otebski] [ In reply to ]
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otebski wrote:
Moreover the extra weight of TL is not in the breaker its in the sidewalls, which need to be thicker in order to avoid sealant seeping.

Fractions of a millimeter difference. You need a thin layer of latex or other boundary layer. The fastest non-TL tend to be a little under 0.75mm. The fastest TL (which are just as fast or faster overall), a little over 0.75mm.





Quote:
Sidewalls being thicker offers pretty much no benefit while making the tyre noticeably less responsive.

What do you mean by "responsive?" I'm not familiar with that characteristic. Do you mean more compliant, e.g. the tire deforms more easily to road imperfections?
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks for the thread and good timing as I'm about to switch to tubeless for crit racing. My current wheelset (Reynolds Strike) has worked great with a GP4000 and tube but I've got a pair of Hed Jet 6's on order which I'll set up tubeless in combination with GP5000 tires (on order).

The main reason for me to go tubeless is for racing, and the ability to hopefully finish a race if I were to have a puncture that would end my race when racing with GP4000s and inner tube. It could be the difference between a DNF or a podium finish so it seems worth it. Also, often in races you will hit rougher road sections or potholes when in the pack that you can't avoid, so the risk of a puncture is higher vs training. For training I'll stick with my Strikes with tubes.... for now. Fixing a flat on the side of the road is no big deal but who knows maybe I'll like my tubeless set up so much I'll switch my training wheels too.

Either way, I'm looking to set up my new wheels next week and I'll provide some feedback or learnings as I go (Hed Jet 6 disc brake, with GP5000TL in 25mm).
Last edited by: Benv: Jul 24, 19 20:39
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Benv wrote:
Thanks for the thread and good timing as I'm about to switch to tubeless for crit racing. My current wheelset (Reynolds Strike) has worked great with a GP4000 and tube but I've got a pair of Hed Jet 6's on order which I'll set up tubeless in combination with GP5000 tires (on order).

The main reason for me to go tubeless is for racing, and the ability to hopefully finish a race if I were to have a puncture that would end my race when racing with GP4000s and inner tube. It could be the difference between a DNF or a podium finish so it seems worth it. Also, often in races you will hit rougher road sections or potholes when in the pack that you can't avoid, so the risk of a puncture is higher vs normal clinchers. For training I'll stick with my Strikes with tubes.... for now. Fixing a flat on the side of the road is no big deal but who knows maybe I'll like my tubeless set up so much I'll switch my training wheels too.

Either way, I'm looking to set up my new wheels next week and I'll provide some feedback or learnings as I go (Hed Jet 6 disc brake, with GP5000TL in 25mm).

Thanks for the setup info. I'll be curious to see how you like it - especially running such wide tires (25mm Conti tires have always inflated to about 28.5mm for me on the wide Hed Jet Plus rims). I haven't heard much feedback yet on tubeless for crit racing i.e. how fast you can you corner after losing some psi with a puncture that seals.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Slowman] [ In reply to ]
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Slowman wrote:
otebski wrote:
Slowman wrote:
otebski wrote:
Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike.


did you read the interview with sebi? a number of us see a big plus to road TL in triathlon. however i respect the contrary view. but that established this is just like disc brakes in road and tri, 3 and 4 years ago. happy to discuss the relative merits. but we're traveling exactly the same trajectory, in a roughly similar time arc, with road TL as we did with road/tri disc brake. it's all going to happen way quicker than you thought it would, hence this thread, to help smooth the transition.


No I did not. And where do you find the benefit of TL? Only one I can imagine is a slim chance to have sealed flat. You would most likely have to stop to reinflate but at least you save that 2 minutes for swapping tube. Other than that?

EDIT: just read the interview. Comparison with butyl setup is not really fair. Moreover the extra weight of TL is not in the breaker its in the sidewalls, which need to be thicker in order to avoid sealant seeping. Sidewalls being thicker offers pretty much no benefit while making the tyre noticeably less responsive.


obviously your editorialized view of the effectiveness of sealant differs from sebi's. it also appears you've made a decision, so, no real need to continue the discussion, is there? this thread exists to help people across the transition to TL, as absolutely (in my opinion) will happen, just as we've tried to do the same here for disc brakes. even those pro triathletes who're not moving to schwalbe are moving in fair numbers to conti TL. and i think hutchinson will have something to say about it.

this isn't to say that TL has displaced and surpassed latex/tubed. it's that we're now at a moment of parity and, just like disc brakes, once you're at that point, there's only one direction that i can see this going.

Well I have shared my opinion and asked for yours. If you think there is no room for discussion so be it.

And I do agree that we will likely see a shift to TL. Regardless of its effectiveness.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [otebski] [ In reply to ]
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otebski wrote:
Slowman wrote:
otebski wrote:
Slowman wrote:
otebski wrote:
Honestly I see no point of TL on road bike.


did you read the interview with sebi? a number of us see a big plus to road TL in triathlon. however i respect the contrary view. but that established this is just like disc brakes in road and tri, 3 and 4 years ago. happy to discuss the relative merits. but we're traveling exactly the same trajectory, in a roughly similar time arc, with road TL as we did with road/tri disc brake. it's all going to happen way quicker than you thought it would, hence this thread, to help smooth the transition.


No I did not. And where do you find the benefit of TL? Only one I can imagine is a slim chance to have sealed flat. You would most likely have to stop to reinflate but at least you save that 2 minutes for swapping tube. Other than that?

EDIT: just read the interview. Comparison with butyl setup is not really fair. Moreover the extra weight of TL is not in the breaker its in the sidewalls, which need to be thicker in order to avoid sealant seeping. Sidewalls being thicker offers pretty much no benefit while making the tyre noticeably less responsive.


obviously your editorialized view of the effectiveness of sealant differs from sebi's. it also appears you've made a decision, so, no real need to continue the discussion, is there? this thread exists to help people across the transition to TL, as absolutely (in my opinion) will happen, just as we've tried to do the same here for disc brakes. even those pro triathletes who're not moving to schwalbe are moving in fair numbers to conti TL. and i think hutchinson will have something to say about it.

this isn't to say that TL has displaced and surpassed latex/tubed. it's that we're now at a moment of parity and, just like disc brakes, once you're at that point, there's only one direction that i can see this going.


Well I have shared my opinion and asked for yours. If you think there is no room for discussion so be it. And I do agree that we will likely see a shift to TL. Regardless of its effectiveness.

obviously there's room for a discussion, and the capacity to share opinions because you've just shared yours. and i welcome that. it just didn't seem to me that there was room in your statements for a discussion, rather just a dissertation: "i see no point of TL on a road bike" on the heels of sebi making the exact point of TL on a road bike (at least in triathlon). but maybe i misconstrued what you wrote.

Dan Empfield
aka Slowman
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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gregk wrote:
Benv wrote:
Thanks for the thread and good timing as I'm about to switch to tubeless for crit racing. My current wheelset (Reynolds Strike) has worked great with a GP4000 and tube but I've got a pair of Hed Jet 6's on order which I'll set up tubeless in combination with GP5000 tires (on order).

The main reason for me to go tubeless is for racing, and the ability to hopefully finish a race if I were to have a puncture that would end my race when racing with GP4000s and inner tube. It could be the difference between a DNF or a podium finish so it seems worth it. Also, often in races you will hit rougher road sections or potholes when in the pack that you can't avoid, so the risk of a puncture is higher vs normal clinchers. For training I'll stick with my Strikes with tubes.... for now. Fixing a flat on the side of the road is no big deal but who knows maybe I'll like my tubeless set up so much I'll switch my training wheels too.

Either way, I'm looking to set up my new wheels next week and I'll provide some feedback or learnings as I go (Hed Jet 6 disc brake, with GP5000TL in 25mm).


Thanks for the setup info. I'll be curious to see how you like it - especially running such wide tires (25mm Conti tires have always inflated to about 28.5mm for me on the wide Hed Jet Plus rims). I haven't heard much feedback yet on tubeless for crit racing i.e. how fast you can you corner after losing some psi with a puncture that seals.


i setup my jet plus with a 25 mm gp 5000 last night, i measured 26.11 today. I wish i had written down the width if the wheel but i think the jet plus wheels are basically measuring ant 24.5. i wonder if that is too wide of a tire for that rim??
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Cookiebuilder] [ In reply to ]
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Cookiebuilder wrote:
gregk wrote:
Benv wrote:
Thanks for the thread and good timing as I'm about to switch to tubeless for crit racing. My current wheelset (Reynolds Strike) has worked great with a GP4000 and tube but I've got a pair of Hed Jet 6's on order which I'll set up tubeless in combination with GP5000 tires (on order).

The main reason for me to go tubeless is for racing, and the ability to hopefully finish a race if I were to have a puncture that would end my race when racing with GP4000s and inner tube. It could be the difference between a DNF or a podium finish so it seems worth it. Also, often in races you will hit rougher road sections or potholes when in the pack that you can't avoid, so the risk of a puncture is higher vs normal clinchers. For training I'll stick with my Strikes with tubes.... for now. Fixing a flat on the side of the road is no big deal but who knows maybe I'll like my tubeless set up so much I'll switch my training wheels too.

Either way, I'm looking to set up my new wheels next week and I'll provide some feedback or learnings as I go (Hed Jet 6 disc brake, with GP5000TL in 25mm).


Thanks for the setup info. I'll be curious to see how you like it - especially running such wide tires (25mm Conti tires have always inflated to about 28.5mm for me on the wide Hed Jet Plus rims). I haven't heard much feedback yet on tubeless for crit racing i.e. how fast you can you corner after losing some psi with a puncture that seals.



i setup my jet plus with a 25 mm gp 5000 last night, i measured 26.11 today. I wish i had written down the width if the wheel but i think the jet plus wheels are basically measuring ant 24.5. i wonder if that is too wide of a tire for that rim??

The Plus rims are ~21mm internal and ~25mm external. Tires usually stretch a bit over time, too. And I haven't used the GP 5000 yet, so I'm not sure if the sizing runs different than the 4000 (but I can 100% confirm how the 4000's run, after using many of them). I have some tube-type 5000's that I need to slap on a set of wheels one of these days.

And a 25mm tire is not too wide for that rim, at least not in terms of safety. Aero you could argue, and a 23mm would be a bit faster (of course, it would inflate to larger than 23mm).

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Since these are technically tubeless... Get rid of the pump and flat problem once and for all. Tannus solid rubber tires. Yes I know CRR is up 1%... But with ironbrand , Alcatraz, nyc race prices ridiculous these days and you are not podium contender, it just makes sense. Or just for training rides if you are


http://www.coupleofathletes.com
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [synthetic] [ In reply to ]
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Had GP 5000 TL put on yesterday by lbs, just went to go for a ride and found my front tire in a puddle and flat. Cleaned up the mess and aired up the tire. Will I need to replace the sealant? Is the tire still rideable...Help.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [tri3ba] [ In reply to ]
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tri3ba wrote:
Had GP 5000 TL put on yesterday by lbs, just went to go for a ride and found my front tire in a puddle and flat. Cleaned up the mess and aired up the tire. Will I need to replace the sealant? Is the tire still rideable...Help.

Hard to say without seeing it in person, knowing the wheel/tape/valve/sealant setup and choices, etc. The easiest blanket answer is that the tire and rim either don't fit tight enough or aren't compatible, resulting in a seal that didn't work. Also could be the wrong sealant, old sealant, not enough sealant, or sealant that wasn't mixed up well enough in the bottle or shaken enough inside the tire to fully coat the rim/tire and get a good seal around the entire bead perimeter. If there was a puddle on the floor, that suggests that you lost quite a bit and yes - you will need to replace what was lost.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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With my background in pressure sensitive adhesives from my previous job I would also look into the time between installing rim tape and mounting the tubeless tire (and adding sealant). Adhesives need some time to fully bond well to any surface so it may just be best to mount the rim tape the day before putting in sealant. If the adhesive hasn't fully flown along the rim surface yet (at the microscopic level) you may have microchannels that aren't air tight and can allow sealant to creep in (potentially killing the rim tape adhesive in the process).

I'd just try again, see if it holds air (without adding more sealant). If it does, then add more sealant and off you go. If it doesn't work, remove the tire and tape, clean the rim, make sure it's fully dry and clean before installing new rim tape, then install new rim tape, let it sit overnight, then install tire and sealant and inflate.
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