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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [ In reply to ]
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I finally received my GP5000TL tires today so I thought I'd set up my brand new Hed Jet Plus wheels. I started by applying two layers of the included HED tape on each wheel with the intent to put on the GP5000TL's, include a tube, inflate and let it sit overnight so I can turn them into tubeless tomorrow. But I was naive and had no clue what a bitch those GP5000s would turn out to be to put over the rim. The tires are very slippery and way too tight; no way I could get anywhere close to being able to put one on the rim. I gave up, and ordered the Koolstop tire bead jack. I should get it on Saturday and will try again then.

In the mean time I took an old GP4000 and put that on. Still a little tight but I could put it on quickly without any tools. Inflated those so at least I know it's not the rims being too much of a problem, and I can try out the wheels with tires soon.

But damn, those GP5000TL's are not gonna be fun to set up...
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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gregk wrote:
Thanks for the comment. I think there's an important clarification to make, whether you support tubeless or traditional clincher tires. I have seen both sides make the argument of "I'm running X setup, and haven't had a flat in _____ time period, therefore my setup is good." While this certainly isn't a worthless data point, I hesitate to put too much emphasis on it. The reason is that the biggest driver of puncture resistance is the thickness/material/construction of the tire tread, casing, and any puncture resistant layers - not whether the tire has a tube or not. Tube pinch flats are another story, but they virtually disappear with proper inflation pressure and tire size.

I respectfully disagree with both of your assertions.

First, pinch flats risk reduces with tubeless full stop. Yes, I can reduce it with tubes by jacking up the pressure and then calling it "proper pressure" when I stop pinch flatting. That's not how I like to determine "proper pressure." "Proper pressure," to me, is the the pressure that gives the best combination of comfort and rolling resistance.

Second, I disagree with your definition of a flat as a puncture. A primary benefit of tubeless is that you can puncture and *not flat*. I measure "flats" by the number of times I have to stop at the side of the road. Not by the number of times something penetrates my tire.

So I think you're discounting the benefits of tubeless on both counts.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Benv wrote:
But damn, those GP5000TL's are not gonna be fun to set up...
The Hed Jet+ / GP5000TL seems to be a tough combination (never tried it myself but from reading all the complaints here). It just doesn't seem like it's worth the hassle to run that combo, does it? It will be tough to mount, tough to fully seat the bead, and if you ever get a flat that doesn't seal on the road you're calling uber. Doesn't seem worth the trouble to me. I would find something that fits better. The current model Corsa Speeds fit the Jet+ rims just fine, for example.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [lanierb] [ In reply to ]
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I will only be using them for crit racing but not training. So any flats or repairs will be taken care of at home, so I am not really worried about flats on the road. So once they’re set up, I should be good for a while. Hopefully with the bead jack it’ll be reasonable.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [lanierb] [ In reply to ]
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I've been using Conti GP5000 clinchers with latex tubes on my TT wheels this year and so far they have been great. However.....They were a PITA to put on, If I were to do Ironman again, I'd probably stick with the GP5000s but go tubeless and just overdose a bit on good sealant. There is NO WAY I'd be able to change those tubes in a race situation...the bike is far more likely to get thrown in to the nearest tree..!

I like the sound of Stans 'Race' sealant, but apparently you can't put in in through the valve because it will seal it...which makes it a nightmare to set up initially.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Hiphophopper] [ In reply to ]
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Hiphophopper wrote:
I've been using Conti GP5000 clinchers with latex tubes on my TT wheels this year and so far they have been great. However.....They were a PITA to put on, If I were to do Ironman again, I'd probably stick with the GP5000s but go tubeless and just overdose a bit on good sealant. There is NO WAY I'd be able to change those tubes in a race situation...the bike is far more likely to get thrown in to the nearest tree..!

I like the sound of Stans 'Race' sealant, but apparently you can't put in in through the valve because it will seal it...which makes it a nightmare to set up initially.

I've put stans through my valve for years and never had it seal it. You take the core out right?
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [trail] [ In reply to ]
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trail wrote:
gregk wrote:

Thanks for the comment. I think there's an important clarification to make, whether you support tubeless or traditional clincher tires. I have seen both sides make the argument of "I'm running X setup, and haven't had a flat in _____ time period, therefore my setup is good." While this certainly isn't a worthless data point, I hesitate to put too much emphasis on it. The reason is that the biggest driver of puncture resistance is the thickness/material/construction of the tire tread, casing, and any puncture resistant layers - not whether the tire has a tube or not. Tube pinch flats are another story, but they virtually disappear with proper inflation pressure and tire size.


I respectfully disagree with both of your assertions.

First, pinch flats risk reduces with tubeless full stop. Yes, I can reduce it with tubes by jacking up the pressure and then calling it "proper pressure" when I stop pinch flatting. That's not how I like to determine "proper pressure." "Proper pressure," to me, is the the pressure that gives the best combination of comfort and rolling resistance.

Second, I disagree with your definition of a flat as a puncture. A primary benefit of tubeless is that you can puncture and *not flat*. I measure "flats" by the number of times I have to stop at the side of the road. Not by the number of times something penetrates my tire.

So I think you're discounting the benefits of tubeless on both counts.


Fair enough. I guess I've never found that my "proper pressure" requires a psi low enough that I'm regularly striking rims on the pavement. I do admittedly run a bit higher pressure on carbon clinchers in some cases purely due to the safety concern of striking the rim hard (especially on rocks... at more than one recent gravel bike product launch ridden on MTB trails). I've tried a wide variety of tire sizes and pressures, just to be clear. The only bike that I really find works best when I'm hitting the rim a lot is the fat bike, which I no longer own. And I don't want to stray from our topic at hand of road tubeless.

Yes, there is a difference between a flat and a puncture. I do think that the more important figure to track for tubeless is punctures that seal before the tire becomes completely flat.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
Last edited by: gregk: Aug 12, 19 18:26
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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My current setup is Reynolds Aero wheels (46's & 65's) rims are 19 internal 28 external. Schwalbe Pro Ones 25's (actually measure @ 29). I have been on this setup for over a year now. Had a few punctures seal.....never left stranded or needed to put a tube in. The Pro Ones, I have been able to mount by hand easily (no finesse needed) and removable with a single plastic tire lever. Negatives are they are not confident tires in wet weather and they seem to have air loss overnight.....not a lot, but enough that I needs some psi before every ride. Need to inflate these using a CO2 as a floor pump does not work.

Always love the Conti GP4000's so wanted to try the GP5000TL for a bit more durability......was worried they would be a tight fit though. My take on any tire (tubeless or not) is if I can't fix it/replace with a tube in the field......I will not use it.

Last week at the start of a 45 mile ride I had what I thought was a sidewall tear on the Pro Ones as had a leak at the tire bead right at the rim edge (with a small bulge).....sealed enough that I could complete the ride. Inspected afterwards and did not see a tear in the tire so I just cleaned the tire and remounted - still had the same leak at what looked like a different spot (and same small budge).....installed new tape and same thing - decided to put the tires aside and will look to find the problem later (my guess is the tire is not seating correctly somehow).

Had already ordered the GP5000TL so I mounted these - 28's that measure 29. Surprised that these mounted just as easily.....hands only and no finesse needed, removable with a single plastic tire lever and able to inflate them with a regular floor pump. A week later and neither tire look to be bleeding any psi's. Granted this is probably due to the GP5000TL 28's being ~90 grams heaver than the comparable Pro One 25's.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Great (and timely) thread! I've been hesitant to make the switch to tubeless, in part because of the added mess and maintenance. I've done the Dirty Kanza 200 tubed without any flats. And I've only ever had one pinch flat on the road -- riding at 30+ mph in the middle of a pack where I didn't see the road crater before I hit it. I didn't see the point of tubeless, but I was curious.

I started with gravel. I've run tubeless on my gravel bike all year with excellent results. Only one puncture -- and it sealed before I knew I had a puncture -- telltale sealant spray on the frame told the tale after the ride. For me, the added benefit in gravel is being able to run extremely low pressures without worry. Not really applicable to my road bike.

For the road, I've been waiting until such time as road tubeless tire performance crosses over to be equal or better than tubed tire performance. It APPEARS that this may have happened with the Conti 5000 TL. Reports indicate the same width TL having the same rolling resistance at a lower pressure than the tubed 5000. The reports are promising enough that I'm going to give it a try.

My situation: On training rides, I generally alternate between two bikes. This means one bike may be on the sidelines, hanging on a rack, for a week or so. In the winter, the road bike may be idle longer just to avoid getting it in winter muck.

My question: How long can you leave a bike idle before the idleness leads to sealant issues? I've noticed that sealant begins to congeal at the bottom of the tire after some point. And tires that previously were well sealed seem to seep a little air after they are left idle for a time. Is there a rule of thumb on how to maintain the sealant in an idle bike? Is it necessary to tilt and spin the wheels periodically to refresh the coating inside the tire?
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Geek_fit] [ In reply to ]
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I second the Dynaplug recommendation. I have the Micro Pro and it's so easy to carry, I just toss it along with a CO2 cartridge in the same pouch I carry my phone and call it a "flat kit".
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [FlashBazbo] [ In reply to ]
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FlashBazbo wrote:
...For the road, I've been waiting until such time as road tubeless tire performance crosses over to be equal or better than tubed tire performance. It APPEARS that this may have happened with the Conti 5000 TL. Reports indicate the same width TL having the same rolling resistance at a lower pressure than the tubed 5000. The reports are promising enough that I'm going to give it a try.

My situation: On training rides, I generally alternate between two bikes. This means one bike may be on the sidelines, hanging on a rack, for a week or so. In the winter, the road bike may be idle longer just to avoid getting it in winter muck.

My question: How long can you leave a bike idle before the idleness leads to sealant issues? I've noticed that sealant begins to congeal at the bottom of the tire after some point. And tires that previously were well sealed seem to seep a little air after they are left idle for a time. Is there a rule of thumb on how to maintain the sealant in an idle bike? Is it necessary to tilt and spin the wheels periodically to refresh the coating inside the tire?

I don't know that I've ever seen a recommendation for this from a sealant or tire manufacturer. Personally, when I had tubeless-equipped bikes, I'd try to pump the tires up at least once per month if they went unridden (mostly to be sure that the tire beads stayed seated properly) - and at that time I'd also give each wheel a hard spin to keep the sealant moving around. You need to add sealant too - typically every six months or so - and that's a time to spin the wheels again.

This also reinforces the need to periodically remove and wipe out the tires completely (i.e. once per year or so) - this will show you the sealant condition clearly, and show if any dried chunks have accumulated.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Geek_fit] [ In reply to ]
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Normal Stand No Tubes is fine..and i'm told very good..but I understand that the 'Race' formula is a newer and has more crystals to make it better for bigger cuts. However, they say that it will block a valve, so you have to pour it straight in to the tyre and then finish mounting it.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Hiphophopper] [ In reply to ]
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Interesting.. I've never poured into the tire like that. Seems like such a mess
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Geek_fit] [ In reply to ]
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It can be done reasonably easy if careful. The bigger the tire the better (fat bike tires really easy, road bike tires a lot more care needed). I generally always add through the valve now. Much less risk of mess.

Apex Cycling - Team Manager
Insta: chris.s.apex
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [cmscat50] [ In reply to ]
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cmscat50 wrote:
It can be done reasonably easy if careful. The bigger the tire the better (fat bike tires really easy, road bike tires a lot more care needed). I generally always add through the valve now. Much less risk of mess.

Perhaps this is something I can cover in a home page article and/or video. It's not bad if done correctly (get the second tire bead 75% on, pour the sealant in... then slowly rotate the wheel/tire so that the sealant is sitting in the area where both tire beads are in place... then finish putting the second bead on the last 25% of the wheel). The time that this can get more difficult or messy is with tire beads that are either really loose or really tight.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Method I found that helps is to actually put the whole tyre on first then lever one bit off with a tyre lever and inject the sealant in the small gap that you make. then remove the lever and tyre just springs back. It took three of us to get 4 x GP5000tl onto 4 x Enve 7.8 rims the other day so no way would I be attempting to do that with sealant loose and sloshing around.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Update - I set up my Hed Jet Plus wheels with Continental GP5000 TL tires this weekend. So, spoiler alert, I got it done in the end. But, it was a total pain in the ass and my hands are all sore from trying to get these tires over the rims.

There are two big problems trying to mount them; first the tire is extraordinarily tight and the forces needed pull a bead over the rim are impossible to overcome without various tools. Secondly the tire slips over the rim so easily that as soon as you're working from one side to force it over a rim it'll move and undo itself on the opposite end. Say you pull the tire over the rim as far as you can, then with any other tire if you were to use tire levers or the Koolstop tire jack you'd have enough friction on the ends of the section that isn't mounted yet, that you can stretch the tire with tools and pull it over the rim without it undoing itself. But because this one is so slippery, one of the ends will start to move and undo already mounted tire sections. Those two things combined make this a total bitch to mount.

In order to prevent this slippage at the ends I decided to use zip ties to tighten a section of mounted tire agains the rim, so to force hold it tight to make slippage more difficult. Not at all perfect but it helped. In combination with a tire lever in one hand and the tire jack in the other hand I eventually got the tire mounted but it always took many tries and close to an hour per tire.

Once mounted, the tire is so tight both beads are in the middle channel of the rim and they'll prevent easy installation of the valve stem. Tightening it causes the bead to get pinched underneath resulting in a leak and the inability to inflate it. This took me quite a few attempts of trying to inflate it with a compressor, then trying to get the valve to be tightened enough without pinching, inflating again, etc. If I didn't have a compressor, no way I'd eventually gotten the tire installed.

If these wheels would be for training I would say it's not worth it trying to set them up with GP5000TL; they simply can not be fixed in the field. But since I'm using them for crit racing it should be OK. Planning to ride them on the road this week in sort crit type training ride to check everything is working fine. But damn installation was no fun.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Benv wrote:
Update - I set up my Hed Jet Plus wheels with Continental GP5000 TL tires this weekend. So, spoiler alert, I got it done in the end. But, it was a total pain in the ass and my hands are all sore from trying to get these tires over the rims.

There are two big problems trying to mount them; first the tire is extraordinarily tight and the forces needed pull a bead over the rim are impossible to overcome without various tools. Secondly the tire slips over the rim so easily that as soon as you're working from one side to force it over a rim it'll move and undo itself on the opposite end. Say you pull the tire over the rim as far as you can, then with any other tire if you were to use tire levers or the Koolstop tire jack you'd have enough friction on the ends of the section that isn't mounted yet, that you can stretch the tire with tools and pull it over the rim without it undoing itself. But because this one is so slippery, one of the ends will start to move and undo already mounted tire sections. Those two things combined make this a total bitch to mount.

In order to prevent this slippage at the ends I decided to use zip ties to tighten a section of mounted tire agains the rim, so to force hold it tight to make slippage more difficult. Not at all perfect but it helped. In combination with a tire lever in one hand and the tire jack in the other hand I eventually got the tire mounted but it always took many tries and close to an hour per tire.

Once mounted, the tire is so tight both beads are in the middle channel of the rim and they'll prevent easy installation of the valve stem. Tightening it causes the bead to get pinched underneath resulting in a leak and the inability to inflate it. This took me quite a few attempts of trying to inflate it with a compressor, then trying to get the valve to be tightened enough without pinching, inflating again, etc. If I didn't have a compressor, no way I'd eventually gotten the tire installed.

If these wheels would be for training I would say it's not worth it trying to set them up with GP5000TL; they simply can not be fixed in the field. But since I'm using them for crit racing it should be OK. Planning to ride them on the road this week in sort crit type training ride to check everything is working fine. But damn installation was no fun.

Thanks for the report. I'm generally hearing that the GP5000TL is fitting tight, but I haven't had the opportunity to try them myself. That is a bit surprising on the HED rims, because they are one of the easier rims to mount tires on (in my experience - and when using the proper technique of using the dropped center channel in the rim bed). For what it's worth, I'm on some Boyd Altamonts now, and they seem to be good in this regard - but the GP5000TL still may be pretty difficult.

The trick I use when one portion of the tire keeps coming unmounted as you mount the other side is to use these little clamps. Or something similar.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Interesting clamps - not sure if I would trust that on a Hed Jet rim because the fairing is very thin and flexible and I wouldn't want to risk cracking it. But, there's gotta be similar tricks or techniques out there that help. The tire definitely plays a big role here - when I installed the tape and put a GP4000 with tube on it (per Hed's recommendations to make the tape seal) I had nowhere near the same issues. Tight fit vs my Hed Belgiums for sure, but nothing difficult or impossible to fix on the side of the road.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Benv wrote:
Interesting clamps - not sure if I would trust that on a Hed Jet rim because the fairing is very thin and flexible and I wouldn't want to risk cracking it. But, there's gotta be similar tricks or techniques out there that help. The tire definitely plays a big role here - when I installed the tape and put a GP4000 with tube on it (per Hed's recommendations to make the tape seal) I had nowhere near the same issues. Tight fit vs my Hed Belgiums for sure, but nothing difficult or impossible to fix on the side of the road.

You don't clamp the carbon fairing - only the alloy portion of the rim (i.e. brake track).

I have a similar experience with the GP 4000 (with tubes) - easy installation on ~2013+ Hed rims. Only issues I've seen are folks that didn't use the dropped center channel and were trying to install tires like it's an old non-tubeless-ready rim.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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gregk wrote:

I have a similar experience with the GP 4000 (with tubes) - easy installation on ~2013+ Hed rims. Only issues I've seen are folks that didn't use the dropped center channel and were trying to install tires like it's an old non-tubeless-ready rim.
Are you clamping the tire bead outside of the rim? Next time you do it please take a pic - I think many of us would benefit from the various tips and tricks to try and mount tubeless tires since clearly there are some fit issues to be worked out before this system is appropriate for any level cyclist.

As to use of the center channel - when I got my Canyon Aeroad which came with Reynolds Strike wheels the various reviews about the wheels said they're a pain to mount and if you got a flat on the road you're screwed because the fit is too tight. But I learned that's 100% about improper (i.e. incomplete) use of the center channel. Yes it's tight but position both beads in the center channel and there's nothing difficult about it. So yes, step one when mounting tires on tubeless ready rims is to do that part right. With the Hed Jets + GP5000TL, that's the easy part.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Benv wrote:
gregk wrote:


I have a similar experience with the GP 4000 (with tubes) - easy installation on ~2013+ Hed rims. Only issues I've seen are folks that didn't use the dropped center channel and were trying to install tires like it's an old non-tubeless-ready rim.

Are you clamping the tire bead outside of the rim? Next time you do it please take a pic - I think many of us would benefit from the various tips and tricks to try and mount tubeless tires since clearly there are some fit issues to be worked out before this system is appropriate for any level cyclist.

You're mounting the 2nd tire bead (1st is already 100% done). You're to the last 25% of it that's not mounted. You're working on mounting from the right side with your thumbs - put a clamp on the LEFT side (on the braking surface), at the last spot where the tire is still fully mounted and engaged, to keep the tire from walking off the rim as you work on the right side.

I was going to shoot a short tubeless video this week, so I'll see if I can work this in to make it more clear.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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That would be great. In my case, even getting the first bead over the rim and getting it to stay there took me a long time. Usually that’s easy but with the Hed/5000TL combo it’s not doable without using a tire bead jack, zip ties and if possible and extra pair of hands even.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [Benv] [ In reply to ]
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Benv wrote:
Update - I set up my Hed Jet Plus wheels with Continental GP5000 TL tires this weekend. So, spoiler alert, I got it done in the end. But, it was a total pain in the ass and my hands are all sore from trying to get these tires over the rims.

There are two big problems trying to mount them; first the tire is extraordinarily tight and the forces needed pull a bead over the rim are impossible to overcome without various tools. Secondly the tire slips over the rim so easily that as soon as you're working from one side to force it over a rim it'll move and undo itself on the opposite end. Say you pull the tire over the rim as far as you can, then with any other tire if you were to use tire levers or the Koolstop tire jack you'd have enough friction on the ends of the section that isn't mounted yet, that you can stretch the tire with tools and pull it over the rim without it undoing itself. But because this one is so slippery, one of the ends will start to move and undo already mounted tire sections. Those two things combined make this a total bitch to mount.

In order to prevent this slippage at the ends I decided to use zip ties to tighten a section of mounted tire agains the rim, so to force hold it tight to make slippage more difficult. Not at all perfect but it helped. In combination with a tire lever in one hand and the tire jack in the other hand I eventually got the tire mounted but it always took many tries and close to an hour per tire.

Once mounted, the tire is so tight both beads are in the middle channel of the rim and they'll prevent easy installation of the valve stem. Tightening it causes the bead to get pinched underneath resulting in a leak and the inability to inflate it. This took me quite a few attempts of trying to inflate it with a compressor, then trying to get the valve to be tightened enough without pinching, inflating again, etc. If I didn't have a compressor, no way I'd eventually gotten the tire installed.

If these wheels would be for training I would say it's not worth it trying to set them up with GP5000TL; they simply can not be fixed in the field. But since I'm using them for crit racing it should be OK. Planning to ride them on the road this week in sort crit type training ride to check everything is working fine. But damn installation was no fun.


I'm a tubeless convert and love the Conti GP5000TL tires......but your scenario would make me stick to tubes and a regular tire that is easier to mount. No way I'm getting stuck out in the middle of the boonies unable to fix a flat.
Maybe I'm still hanging onto old school mentality, but I still carry a spare tube and air for that just in case. Maybe running tubeless I should just be good carrying some air and a Tubeless Tire Plug tool and anything worse....just call home for a ride.

fyi........I thought the Schawalbe Pro Ones and Conti 5000TL were about equal to install/remove.
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Re: Tubeless wheel and tire SUPER THREAD [gregk] [ In reply to ]
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Just a quick heads-up, we have a new article on the home page about hooked vs hookless rims.

This was an interesting one to research, and it seems that there are some very different opinions and design philosophies among wheel manufacturers. In particular, it was notable that HED specifically left hooks on their Vanquish line for aerodynamic reasons, while ENVE seems to be going for more of a gravel / off-road / impact-resistance target with their latest AR wheels (note that their existing road-specific wheels use hooks... though all indications are that they're moving full-steam into hookless / tubeless / wide tires for the future). I also found it interesting that ENVE is taking a hard line on which tires aren't compatible, while Alto allows any tire - tubed or tubeless (under 100psi) - on their hookless road rims.

Greg Kopecky - Slowtwitch Tech Editor
Founder of Minimal Multisport Athlete website, blog, podcast, and Youtube channel: https://www.minimalmultisport.com/
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