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Relentless nausea all 24/7
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I have been suffering from constant nausea (no vomiting though) for the past 2 years accompanied by dizziness. I'm also very tired (even during the off season), which makes training even harder. It seems I've tried everything on the planet and I'm running out of options. Sometimes the nausea gets so bad swimming that I have to stop my swim workout and can't function for the rest of the day. Any suggestions what this could be caused by and how to fix it?
I also have severe headaches all day as well as neck pain. :(
Last edited by: trirocket: Mar 6, 19 9:07
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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I'm assuming you've been to your doctor?

I get nauseated when I'm really tired (and dizzy too) - no help, but I'm sure it's all interconnected.

That must be awful to live with. :(
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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I saw the title and my immediate reaction was to advise you to POAS. But I doubt you've been pregnant for 2+ years.

This sounds like vertigo or a vertigo-like syndrome like Meniere's Disease or viral labrynthitis. I'd schedule an appointment with your PCP to get a referral to either/both an ENT/neurologist.

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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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It could possibly be some form of dysautonomia. I had similar nausea/dizziness issues, although mine were predominantly, but not exclusively, at night. I figured it out myself, and it took about ten doctors before I found someone who actually knew anything about it and could help. Essentially it came down to an overstimulated vagus nerve and really unstable blood pressure. There is medication that can help, notably Florinef (fludrocortisone). I also consume massive quantities of sodium -- probably 4-6 SaltStick capsules per day, plus an Osmo Preload every day -- as well as lots of water. Try to find a specialist before you do that, though. It's usually a cardiologist or neurologist. David Cannom in the Los Angeles area is good if that's where you are.

P.S.: Don't be alarmed by the Parkinson's part on the web page I linked. People with Parkinson's often have dysautonomia, but very few people with dysautonomia have Parkinson's.
Last edited by: HeidiC: Feb 12, 19 11:06
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [edbikebabe] [ In reply to ]
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Yes, I've been to various doctors. I also think they are connected. It seems getting worse.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [Dr_Cupcake] [ In reply to ]
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Dr_Cupcake wrote:
I saw the title and my immediate reaction was to advise you to POAS. But I doubt you've been pregnant for 2+ years.

This sounds like vertigo or a vertigo-like syndrome like Meniere's Disease or viral labrynthitis. I'd schedule an appointment with your PCP to get a referral to either/both an ENT/neurologist.

I'm definitely not pregnant. Those times are over. ;)
I've seen both a neurologist and an ENT. Even though I didn't have the symptoms of vertigo, the latter performed the Epley maneuver with the chair for both ears. Another time he suspected Meniere's and put me on a water pill, which screwed up my entire metabolism so I couldn't even function anymore.
The nausea is actually most debilitating.
I had an endoscopy done a year ago because I have problems swallowing and was diagnosed with Barrett's. But even Nexium, Omeprazole and alike didn't provide any relief with the nausea.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [HeidiC] [ In reply to ]
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HeidiC wrote:
It could possibly be some form of dysautonomia. I had similar nausea/dizziness issues, although mine were predominantly, but not exclusively, at night. I figured it out myself, and it took about ten doctors before I found someone who actually knew anything about it and could help. Essentially it came down to an overstimulated vagus nerve and really unstable blood pressure. There is medication that can help, notably Florinef (fludrocortisone). I also consume massive quantities of sodium -- probably 4-6 SaltStick capsules per day, plus an Osmo Preload every day -- as well as lots of water. Try to find a specialist before you do that, though. It's usually a cardiologist or neurologist. David Cannom in the Los Angeles area is good if that's where you are.

P.S.: Don't be alarmed by the Parkinson's part on the web page I linked. People with Parkinson's often have dysautonomia, but very few people with dysautonomia have Parkinson's.

Low sodium crossed my mind, but my bloodwork's Na levels are totally normal. How did you figure out that it was dysautonomia? Did your blood show any abnormalities? I do have neuro-cardiac syncope, but it only happens once in a blue moon.
Unfortunately, I'm at the opposite coast. :(
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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My sodium levels have always been normal too; in fact, they've changed very little even though I'm pounding sodium now (7000-10,000 mg/day). I just looked back over all my bloodwork and even when I was at my untreated worst my serum sodium levels were fine. I think there's some difference between how they measure sodium in blood tests and how sodium functions in dysautonomia; seems like I read something but I can't find the reference. I figured it out because when I googled my symptoms, that's what kept coming up and the more I researched, the more it seemed to fit what I have. I think in your case there's at least some chance that what you're getting could be a sub-clinical neuro-cardiac syncope -- not enough to make you pass out but enough to make you feel nauseous. That's essentially what I had/have. Not that I'm diagnosing you, mind you. I'm not an MD; just a lowly PhD, lol.

If you go to the Dysautonomia International website, they have a Doctor Finder. My doc wasn't on there, but you might be able to find one that way. If you don't have high blood pressure, you could try some sodium supplementation, but you do have to take a lot; it's not just putting extra salt on your food. I take a medication called fludrocortisone to help me retain sodium (and water -- not so awesome but better than feeling like I could vomit at any second). BTW, before I got diagnosed, it seemed like whenever I checked my BP it was high, but that's because it was just really unstable.

ETA: It's not just increasing sodium -- you have to increase water intake as well. The point of the sodium is to help you keep the water in you. It's the fluid that stabilizes your bp.
Last edited by: HeidiC: Feb 12, 19 14:54
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [HeidiC] [ In reply to ]
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HeidiC wrote:
My sodium levels have always been normal too; in fact, they've changed very little even though I'm pounding sodium now (7000-10,000 mg/day). I just looked back over all my bloodwork and even when I was at my untreated worst my serum sodium levels were fine. I think there's some difference between how they measure sodium in blood tests and how sodium functions in dysautonomia; seems like I read something but I can't find the reference. I figured it out because when I googled my symptoms, that's what kept coming up and the more I researched, the more it seemed to fit what I have. I think in your case there's at least some chance that what you're getting could be a sub-clinical neuro-cardiac syncope -- not enough to make you pass out but enough to make you feel nauseous. That's essentially what I had/have. Not that I'm diagnosing you, mind you. I'm not an MD; just a lowly PhD, lol.

If you go to the Dysautonomia International website, they have a Doctor Finder. My doc wasn't on there, but you might be able to find one that way. If you don't have high blood pressure, you could try some sodium supplementation, but you do have to take a lot; it's not just putting extra salt on your food. I take a medication called fludrocortisone to help me retain sodium (and water -- not so awesome but better than feeling like I could vomit at any second). BTW, before I got diagnosed, it seemed like whenever I checked my BP it was high, but that's because it was just really unstable.

ETA: It's not just increasing sodium -- you have to increase water intake as well. The point of the sodium is to help you keep the water in you. It's the fluid that stabilizes your bp.

Wow! It's amazing that you were able to figure this out yourself. I always have the feeling that whenever I google my symptoms I could go in so many different directions and almost every single diagnosis is more than severe. I just checked their website. Unfortunately, there isn't a specialized doc in my area. I wonder if I could go to a topnotch cardiologist in town to at least get things started. I have always had pretty low bp, but during the past two physicals I had the nurse indicated it was high. When the doc measured it minutes later, it was low.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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do you wear earplugs swimming? that might help for the swim part of the day

Proud member of Fishtwitch and the ST Grammar Police
disclaimer: PhD not MD
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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trirocket wrote:
Wow! It's amazing that you were able to figure this out yourself. I always have the feeling that whenever I google my symptoms I could go in so many different directions and almost every single diagnosis is more than severe. I just checked their website. Unfortunately, there isn't a specialized doc in my area. I wonder if I could go to a topnotch cardiologist in town to at least get things started. I have always had pretty low bp, but during the past two physicals I had the nurse indicated it was high. When the doc measured it minutes later, it was low.

I do research for a living (educational, not medical) so I have this odd capacity to be way too relentless when I get myself riled up, and am also familiar with medical literature, which definitely helps. I would say you're better off with a cardiologist than a neurologist, but it's still not guaranteed they will know. You might request a tilt table test; he/she should be familiar with that, although it's not required for diagnosis. My cardiologist also wasn't listed on that site, but I found him through googling "Los Angeles doctor dysautonomia," or something like that. It took several months for him to turn up in my search results. Good luck! Don't give up. Relentless nausea is not normal.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [HeidiC] [ In reply to ]
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HeidiC wrote:
I do research for a living (educational, not medical) so I have this odd capacity to be way too relentless when I get myself riled up.

I like how you say that - this thread got me to search "dysautonomia" so learned some interesting things. Like other autoimmune diseases coming to a good diagnosis and correct medication can take a long time. My cousin has been suffering from RA for years now, at least that disease is 'visible', if you are 'only nauseus' it can be hard to get proper attention. So yes, be relentless OP and don't give up on finding resolution.

I suffer from migraines (post menopausal) and will say that nausea is a big part of my symptoms (along with the high speed drill going off in my head). But if I take my meds promptly, and not think 'it will go away' I'm ok.

Anne Barnes
ABBikefit, Ltd
FIST/SICI/FIST DOWN DEEP
X/Y Coordinator
abbikefit@gmail.com
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [ABarnes] [ In reply to ]
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May I ask if your migraines are daily or 1-2 per month? And what meds are you taking?
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [Dr. Tigerchik] [ In reply to ]
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Dr. Tigerchik wrote:
do you wear earplugs swimming? that might help for the swim part of the day
I usually don't. Only in races. But I will definitely give it a try. Thank you.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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i'm on 100mg sumitriptan succhinate, taken with symptom. It totally does the trick fully within an hour.

Ten years ago is was only 1 a month, also when I started menopause, but past three years it can be 1-2 a month. Just turned 55 this past fall, so way post-menopausal. mild hot flashes early on in that phase too, but they didn't seem to correlate with the migraines.

Definite triggers are wheat beers, general dehyrdration, and not taking my multivitamin.

Anne Barnes
ABBikefit, Ltd
FIST/SICI/FIST DOWN DEEP
X/Y Coordinator
abbikefit@gmail.com
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [ABarnes] [ In reply to ]
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ABarnes wrote:
i'm on 100mg sumitriptan
In Reply To:
succhinate, taken with symptom. It totally does the trick fully within an hour.

Ten years ago is was only 1 a month, also when I started menopause, but past three years it can be 1-2 a month. Just turned 55 this past fall, so way post-menopausal. mild hot flashes early on in that phase too, but they didn't seem to correlate with the migraines.

Definite triggers are wheat beers, general dehyrdration, and not taking my multivitamin.
Migraines are terrible. Glad you found a remedy though. 👍 I only get them once in a blue moon - sometimes spread out close to a year. Instead I suffer from daily headaches and neck pain.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [trirocket] [ In reply to ]
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I would presume at this point that you've had your thyroid/TSH/T4/T3 checked? If not, that's worth a try.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [ksb] [ In reply to ]
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ksb wrote:
I would presume at this point that you've had your thyroid/TSH/T4/T3 checked? If not, that's worth a try.
Yes, I have. Thank you.
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Re: Relentless nausea all 24/7 [Dr_Cupcake] [ In reply to ]
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Dr_Cupcake wrote:
I saw the title and my immediate reaction was to advise you to POAS. But I doubt you've been pregnant for 2+ years.

This sounds like vertigo or a vertigo-like syndrome like Meniere's Disease or viral labrynthitis. I'd schedule an appointment with your PCP to get a referral to either/both an ENT/neurologist.

I’m inclined to agree with vertigo or upper cervical (neck) issues that can cause headaches and the symptoms you are describing, Depending on where you are as to how it gets managed but I presume you’re in the US so I think everything will cost lots of money and have to go through doctors rather than seeing a vestibular physio directly who can treat your neck and vertigo but also screen for central neurological problems. You may need a neurologist or ENT for medical investigations (consider middle ear issues, inner ear issues, vertebral artery occlusion, cerebellar problems) but if they are all clear, I would go see a physio and get your upper neck assessed and treated.
Good luck- 2 years is far too long to be putting up with that.
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