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"Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces
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Hi All. Looking for recommendations for a new Tri bike that will be comfortable on the crap UK road surfaces. I want something with disc brakes so I can use 28mm-30mm tyres, plus have the consistent braking as the weather is SO unpredictable. I am leaning towards the Cervelo PX Series (Both size L & XL hit my fit co-ordinates), but was wondering if anyone had any experience of the P5 Disc vs the PX series, with regards to actual comfort from road noise/vibrations etc. Anything else I should be looking at? I am 188cm, 88Kgs, MOP. Currently on a Giant Trinity Advanced Pro (Large). Measured to rear of the pad, Pad X is 690mm and Pad Y is 460mm. Saddle height around 820mm. This is a comfortable position on the Trinity that I can maintain. I am just looking at a frame as I have all of the components from a previous bike, except the Hydraulic TT Shifters/Brakes.
Thanks in advance
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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I haven't ridden the PX or Pseries disc, but I can pretty much garauntee you're going to want a beam bike if road conditions and comfort are your primary criteria. There are certainly other forms of comfort out there (crosswinds and such), where other bikes might do better, but from purely eating up road vibrations you want a beam. With the disc brake requirement, this of course leaves you with either the PX bikes or the Ceepo Shadow. Can pretty much count on the Cervelo's being faster so I don't think you need to overthink this one.

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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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Not sure what the level of "crap UK road surfaces" are relative to other locations, but you might want to look into a way to maximize tire volume. Maybe even using a *gasp* gravel-oriented bike...

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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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Also, you could look into the Kinekt seatpost as an add-on (as long as your frame uses a round seatpost).

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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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I ride a Cervelo P3X (same as current PX Series). Its a fantastic bike.
  • Handles like a road bike and doesn't feel like its about to kill you
  • Very stable a high speed
  • Lots of storage


Previously I had a specialized Shiv, on the flat there is not much difference between the 2 bikes, other than the Cervelo feeling more relaxed. On climbs, the Shiv is lighter, but Cervelo is stiffer, so better power transmission, as a result, the Cervelo climbs better when out of the saddle, however, really not much to split them. On the descents, the Cervelo leaves the Shiv far behind, better brakes, better handling, better everything.

In our local cycling club we have a 30km out and back TT, I currently have the 2 fastest times, both under 39 minutes.... so its certainly not a slow bike
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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As someone else from Blightly, can certainly confirm 'crap' means 'crap' when it comes to road conditions!

Reap bikes have a new 'Vulcan' beam bike launching in a few days.
You'd sort of hope they understand the shiiite UK road conditions and that brakes that work in the wet are vital. Maybe worth a look when they show it in a few days ?
I suspect it's not going to be cheap. But then again neither is a PX.

As far as swapping stuff over from you current bike, the detail compatibility issues I always try to not forget are things like the axles (QR or bolt through) or did you mean you'd get a frame and build up as you want it (as I assume your current wheels will be rim braked?) And whether the frame BB will support your crankset/BB combo.
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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afraid I can't help for a tri bike for British roads, but can only sympathise with the state of some of them... there's a reason I got a hardtail MTB to use as my bad weather winter bike!
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [BobAjobb] [ In reply to ]
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BobAjobb wrote:
As someone else from Blightly, can certainly confirm 'crap' means 'crap' when it comes to road conditions!

Reap bikes have a new 'Vulcan' beam bike launching in a few days.
You'd sort of hope they understand the shiiite UK road conditions and that brakes that work in the wet are vital. Maybe worth a look when they show it in a few days ?
I suspect it's not going to be cheap. But then again neither is a PX.

As far as swapping stuff over from you current bike, the detail compatibility issues I always try to not forget are things like the axles (QR or bolt through) or did you mean you'd get a frame and build up as you want it (as I assume your current wheels will be rim braked?) And whether the frame BB will support your crankset/BB combo.

Yes I already have a set of Hunt 50 disc brake (12mm thru axle) carbon wheels. I stripped all the gear off a Factor One Aero bike I’m going to sell, so it’s all very new.
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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Also UK based and looking at a new disc brake tt bike next season for the same reasons.

I think tyre volume and pressure will play a more significant role in comfort than the frame style. Not sure where you are in the UK but I've personally ruled out the PX due to the weight. Yes I know aero trumps weight but not when you're out of the saddle climbing a lot of the time on the short sharp hills we have. If you live in East Anglia however it would be a good choice :-)
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [jn46] [ In reply to ]
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jn46 wrote:
Also UK based and looking at a new disc brake tt bike next season for the same reasons.

I think tyre volume and pressure will play a more significant role in comfort than the frame style. Not sure where you are in the UK but I've personally ruled out the PX due to the weight. Yes I know aero trumps weight but not when you're out of the saddle climbing a lot of the time on the short sharp hills we have. If you live in East Anglia however it would be a good choice :-)

Ironman Wales will be my A race next year (if it goes ahead). I sometimes do IMUK as a warm up too, with some smaller local events thrown in. So both of those long course bike legs are fairly hilly. Weight is something I keep my eye on, but I could probably do with losing a few kg too. My race weight is around 85/86kg, but I could easily drop to 80 and not lose any power. I have found with my aero race bike that rolling on 28s helps a lot with comfort, but when in the aero position my lower back takes the hits more on a rough road surface, so looking for the fastest/most forgiving option that is suited to My needs.
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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PX probably a good choice then with the storage for a covid secure self sufficient race. There are a few more options with the new argon e119, and probably canyon in a few weeks/months, although doubt the latter will be frameset only.
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Re: "Comfortable" Tri Bike Recommendations for Poor Road Surfaces [Xplombier] [ In reply to ]
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Full disclosure, i am just a middle-of-pack age grouper.
I ride in New England with similarly terrible roads, and potholes everywhere.

Very much enjoying my Cervelo P3X—riding with ENVE 7.8 discs with Conti GP5000TL 25mm inflated to 80 psi.
Nice combination of aero and comfortable ride, and road tubeless tires at lower pressures smoothies out the irregular roads.
Feel fresher coming off the bike.
Lots of storage and hydration choices for the long solo rides.

I thought the geometry effects of the beam bike might only be in my head, but realized it was real when I swapped out my BMC for the Cervelo on my Wahoo Kickr trainer the other day. When the rear thruaxle is bolted and locked in, I could really feel a difference between a full rear triangle bike versus the beam bike.
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