Login required to started new threads

Login required to post replies

BarryP for the impatient runner
Quote | Reply
So i'm scaling back competitive bike riding due to work and family commitments and starting to run again. Cycling also stopped being fun, and I need a change of focus.

At the moment I'm running 6km three times a week at 5:30 min/k. I do resistance work and then maybe 2/3 rides a week.

BarryP's plan would have me starting back on 15mins a day for six days a week and building up from there. I can see that I will struggle with the shortness of these runs, not to mention trying to do them slowly. I like running for at least 30 mins, but the plan is the plan. https://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ntraining20;#1949381

Will skip ahead if necessary, but i suppose my question was whether this 10% rule has a scientific basis, or is just a heuristic that we've all adopted?
Quote Reply
Re: BarryP for the impatient runner [alexZA] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Starting from 15min and use the 10% rule will make you spend the next decade on becoming a decent runner. Think it all depends on weight, history and running form. Your fitness should be there but make sure you can handle all the pounding.

It is difficult to make predictions, especially about the future
Quote Reply
Re: BarryP for the impatient runner [Schnellinger] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Not really - even if you apply the 10% rule literally and rigorously it compounds, so in 3 months weekly volume would more than triple from 18km to over 60km which is very solid. Keep going another 3 months it triples again and you're now training like an international long distance runner! Or you're injured...

The 10% rule obviously isn't a hard and fast one. There are people with good running form and/or who have a running background who will be able to ramp up volume in the early stages by more than 10% per week with no problems. But it's a good rule of thumb and it really doesn't hold anybody back for long, as I illustrated above you'll be hitting decent mileage pretty quickly and continuing to increase at 10% per week quickly becomes impossible.

To the OP, the BarryP plan and being impatient are kind of mutually incompatible! The whole ethos of his approach is to become a good runner over a period of months and years through consistency and repeatability. If that sounds too long then you can absolutely try and speed things up, and you might be one of the lucky ones whose body can handle it and gets fast quick. Or you might be one of the ones who can't handle it, go through a few cycles of overdoing it, injuring yourself, recovering and repeating, and will come back here older, wiser and more patient!
Quote Reply
Re: BarryP for the impatient runner [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Excellent post, which I am reading with ice on my right knee. LOL.

Will stick to the program and keep this thread updated. I'm hoping to get up to around 60-80km per week, ultimately. Want to do the odd half-mara, and some trail races here and there, so this plan of consistency is a good one.

Really frustrating coming from riding where you can just smash yourself without too many consequences. You'd think I'd be a little more sensible at 41...
Quote Reply
Re: BarryP for the impatient runner [alexZA] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
If it's any consolation I'm 43 and it took me quite a few running injuries to learn patience! I find the best thing is even if you're doing a run focus is still do some bike or swim cross training to get the intensity in while your body is adapting to be able to cope with more running stress.
Quote Reply
Re: BarryP for the impatient runner [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I've followed the BarryP program in the past with good success (build up from 30k/week to 70k/week). But to make the distances easier to calculate instead of adding 10% a week I added 0.5km to the shortest run per week (so medium 1k, longest 1.5k). So under 50k/week you add more than 10% per week, over 50k/week you start adding less than 10% a week. I feel this slightly reduces risk of injury, especially when the mileage get high.
Quote Reply