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iron deficiency anemia
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I'm a college triathlete that is struggling with iron deficiency anemia. When I was first diagnosed in May of this year my ferratin (iron) levels were at 4 and my hemoglobin level was 10.1. Since my last blood test at the end of August my ferratin level is now 29 and my hemoglobin is 10.4. Also a lot of the other things the blood tests measured are still lower than the recommended levels such as MCH, MCV, and HCT. Though my retics levels are high, which according to my research means that the treatment is working. I also have beta thalassemia. I'm taking 3 iron pills a day with vitamin C pills to help it absorb better. I was hoping that since my ferratin level was now so much higher I would feel much better and start to regain the speed I've lost (which has been substantial in running). Unfortunately I still feel very tired all the time with training and overly sore (though I have made great deal of progress in getting back to my former speed though I thought it may be sooner that I'd be feeling better). I have my college season right now and racing is getting very frustrating because my legs feel like they are going to shut down even though I have more energy to keep going faster. It feels like I can't clear lactic acid well and gets very painful. Has anyone else struggled with iron deficiency anemia and know how long it takes to feel better? Also does training and racing hard make it harder for the treatment to work? Since I've had a race (all olympic distance) almost every or every other weekend, I have been taking it pretty easy to see if my body can actually recover. I've tested negative for celiacs.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [zoomer26] [ In reply to ]
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we have a few threads on the womens forum about this.

what worked for me was LIQUID iron, eating red meat, and rest.



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"so i've got that going for me, which is nice"
- Carl Spackler
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [zoomer26] [ In reply to ]
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The Floradix iron supplement (liquid supplement with B vitamins and other vitamins) gave me very quick results. However i really disliked the taste. I now take Proferrin, which is heme iron and much easier absorbed without the usual side effects and I really like the results I'm getting. The only downside is that it is pretty expensive ($60 for a 90 pill bottle).
Last edited by: LoDewey: Sep 15, 13 11:23
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [LoDewey] [ In reply to ]
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If it's a chronic condition, you might want to check that out with blood tests/analysis. It usually takes 3 to 6 months for iron levels to recover in your blood after start taking pills. If your iron level is still about the same there might an underlying condition. Certain foods block iron absorption, there might possibly be vitamin deficiency or other causes that are a lot more complex.

Axel
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [sto] [ In reply to ]
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sto wrote:
we have a few threads on the womens forum about this.

what worked for me was LIQUID iron, eating red meat, and rest.

I am not a hematopathologist, nor would I give advice on this thread even if I was. Still, it is worth pointing out that this poster's anemia could be entirely due to their beta thalassemia (I have no idea where they fall on the rather broad spectrum). It is not the same as iron deficiency anemia which many female triathletes suffer from and should definitely not be viewed/treated the same way.

To the OP, your anemia needs to be managed by a qualified healthcare professional- taking advice that works for folks with nutritional anemia could be potentially harmful. Talk to your doctor, tell them your concerns and work with them to improve your quality of life. If you don't feel they are responding well to your concerns, considering finding another healthcare professional. Best of luck.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [sto] [ In reply to ]
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Do you have the links to these threads? I couldn't find them when I searched for them.

Also anyone that has had experience with low iron levels, do your legs feel the same way? Like there is so much lactic acid buildup? What have you done to cope with this during training and racing? I have my last race of the season coming up and want to be able to keep a more consistent bike speed.

Thank you everyone for your help!
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [zoomer26] [ In reply to ]
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zoomer26 wrote:
I'm a college triathlete that is struggling with iron deficiency anemia. When I was first diagnosed in May of this year my ferratin (iron) levels were at 4 and my hemoglobin level was 10.1. Since my last blood test at the end of August my ferratin level is now 29 and my hemoglobin is 10.4. Also a lot of the other things the blood tests measured are still lower than the recommended levels such as MCH, MCV, and HCT. Though my retics levels are high, which according to my research means that the treatment is working. I also have beta thalassemia. I'm taking 3 iron pills a day with vitamin C pills to help it absorb better along with a folvite
. I was hoping that since my ferratin level was now so much higher I would feel much better and start to regain the speed I've lost (which has been substantial in running). Unfortunately I still feel very tired all the time with training and overly sore (though I have made great deal of progress in getting back to my former speed though I thought it may be sooner that I'd be feeling better). I have my college season right now and racing is getting very frustrating because my legs feel like they are going to shut down even though I have more energy to keep going faster. It feels like I can't clear lactic acid well and gets very painful. Has anyone else struggled with iron deficiency anemia and know how long it takes to feel better? Also does training and racing hard make it harder for the treatment to work? Since I've had a race (all olympic distance) almost every or every other weekend, I have been taking it pretty easy to see my body can actually recover. I've tested negative for celiacs.



I am a firm believer that Ayurveda are the way forward for all athletes. In such circumstances strong pills can imp[act the health negatively plus there are countless side effects. These are few things which should help you. Massage (Abyhanga)
Flushing out toxins in the body through the use of lymphatic massage aids in circulation.
Right nostril breathing (Suyra Bhedan/pranayama)
This pranayama aids the liver, builds blood and brings oxygen to the body and mind.
Exercise
Although the patient will be experiencing fatigue, light and regular exercise such as walking and yoga will encourage the flow of prana in the body.
Diet
Foods that aid in iron intake include beetroot and carrot juice with a pinch of cumin; all leafy green and cruciferous vegetables (for their chlorophyll); raisins, currants and berries; citrus fruits; dates; nuts; lightly stewed apples or pears with prunes, fresh figs, grapes and pomegranate; and onions, celery and spices such as fenugreek.
Cook with an iron pan.
Eating a cup of plain yogurt with one teaspoon of turmeric before lunch and dinner can greatly benefit iron-deficiency anemia.
Filling a copper cup with room temperature tap water, letting it stand overnight and drinking it in the morning will help increase intake of vital minerals.
Herbs
The high content of vitamin C in triphala, which is a very good ayurvedic medicine will help in the absorption of iron, as well as aid in the detoxification process.
Shatavari ghee or bitter ghee may also be beneficial, depending on if the anemia is being expressed as pitta-type or vata-type, respectively.
Taking back control of the body and mind through practicing these methods should bring relief in time. Fatigue will dissipate, moods will elevate, and a clearer mind and stronger body will be the outcome.



- Renuka
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Renuka Shinde] [ In reply to ]
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Pardon my ignorance of Ayurveda but is there a scientific basis to any of this?

I'm especially worried by suggestions like:
Renuka Shinde wrote:
Filling a copper cup with room temperature tap water, letting it stand overnight and drinking it in the morning will help increase intake of vital minerals
What, if any, is the logic behind this?
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Ai_1] [ In reply to ]
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Ai_1 wrote:
Pardon my ignorance of Ayurveda but is there a scientific basis to any of this?

I'm especially worried by suggestions like:
Renuka Shinde wrote:
Filling a copper cup with room temperature tap water, letting it stand overnight and drinking it in the morning will help increase intake of vital minerals

What, if any, is the logic behind this?

This is the equivalent of somebody chiming in to a legitimate discussion with their essential oil sales pitch. There's no logic or science behind it at all and has no place here.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Ai_1] [ In reply to ]
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I think so. Breathing does bring oxygen to the body. Wether just breathing through the right nostril brings more oxygen to the body I don't know. Maybe that depends on being a left- or right-oriented breather.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Ai_1] [ In reply to ]
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Copper surfaces are reactive with water and air. My proof of this is the Cu water pipes in my basement, which show a little discoloration at joints where slow leaking has occurred, though the white build up is lime from the water and not due to the Cu. Also, Statue of Liberty, was copper/bronze colored, then green, then restored to copper/bronze color. I'm also a chemist, not that that's the proof you seek.

All that said, since your condition is affecting you as much as it is, a voodoo doll would likely be equally effective at bring you improvement as drinking 12 h old water from a copper cup.

To breathe, to feel, to know I'm alive.
Last edited by: Tsunami: Feb 14, 18 4:05
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Derekl] [ In reply to ]
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Derekl wrote:
This is the equivalent of somebody chiming in to a legitimate discussion with their essential oil sales pitch. There's no logic or science behind it at all and has no place here.
This.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Derekl] [ In reply to ]
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Derekl wrote:
Ai_1 wrote:
Pardon my ignorance of Ayurveda but is there a scientific basis to any of this?

I'm especially worried by suggestions like:
Renuka Shinde wrote:
Filling a copper cup with room temperature tap water, letting it stand overnight and drinking it in the morning will help increase intake of vital minerals

What, if any, is the logic behind this?


This is the equivalent of somebody chiming in to a legitimate discussion with their essential oil sales pitch. There's no logic or science behind it at all and has no place here.
Ah, you ruined it on me! I was hoping he'd come back with some sort of pseudo-scientific explanation that I could rip apart....I'm mean that way.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Yknot] [ In reply to ]
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Yknot wrote:
sto wrote:
we have a few threads on the womens forum about this.

what worked for me was LIQUID iron, eating red meat, and rest.


I am not a hematopathologist, nor would I give advice on this thread even if I was. Still, it is worth pointing out that this poster's anemia could be entirely due to their beta thalassemia (I have no idea where they fall on the rather broad spectrum). It is not the same as iron deficiency anemia which many female triathletes suffer from and should definitely not be viewed/treated the same way.

To the OP, your anemia needs to be managed by a qualified healthcare professional- taking advice that works for folks with nutritional anemia could be potentially harmful. Talk to your doctor, tell them your concerns and work with them to improve your quality of life. If you don't feel they are responding well to your concerns, considering finding another healthcare professional. Best of luck.

This needs to be said again.

Granted iron levels were probably low initially, hammering iron is not going to affect the beta thalassemia. If anything, iron overload is a significant health risk for thalassemia patients.

To the OP. What is important at the moment is getting this under control, not your upcoming race season. That requires the help of a medical professional. Second opinions are often worthwhile.

The above poster is a physiologist employed by Pearl Izumi. However, statements are not made on behalf of nor reflective of PI in any manner... unless they're good, then they count.
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twitter.com/RobertPickels
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Derekl] [ In reply to ]
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Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.

> A damn fine point, Sir!

To breathe, to feel, to know I'm alive.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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Lots of zombie threads being resurrected by that bot today.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Erin C.] [ In reply to ]
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Erin C. wrote:
Lots of zombie threads being resurrected by that bot today.

Doh! I fell for it again - didn't look at the OP date.

To breathe, to feel, to know I'm alive.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Erin C.] [ In reply to ]
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Erin C. wrote:
Lots of zombie threads being resurrected by that bot today.

Give the buy a break. He' just being very thorough with his answers.

It takes him a long time to research, document and prove via double blind experiment.


"Good genes are not a requirement, just the obsession to beat ones brains out daily"...the Griz
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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Tsunami wrote:
Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.

> A damn fine point, Sir!

Van Gogh didn't cut his ear off due to absinthe directly, but rather that at the time it was distilled with copper pipes/containers. This leached into the absinthe. It has been found that excess copper does cause brain danage


http://www.coupleofathletes.com
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [synthetic] [ In reply to ]
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synthetic wrote:
Tsunami wrote:
Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.

> A damn fine point, Sir!


Van Gogh didn't cut his ear off due to absinthe directly, but rather that at the time it was distilled with copper pipes/containers. This leached into the absinthe. It has been found that excess copper does cause brain danage

While super duper interesting (really....), that's not even remotely relevant to the discussion, and I was making a joke.

You're a weird dude.
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Derekl] [ In reply to ]
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Derekl wrote:
synthetic wrote:
Tsunami wrote:
Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.

> A damn fine point, Sir!


Van Gogh didn't cut his ear off due to absinthe directly, but rather that at the time it was distilled with copper pipes/containers. This leached into the absinthe. It has been found that excess copper does cause brain danage


While super duper interesting (really....), that's not even remotely relevant to the discussion, and I was making a joke.

You're a weird dude.


I know, but that Ayurveda witch doctor is not


http://www.coupleofathletes.com
Last edited by: synthetic: Feb 15, 18 15:19
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [synthetic] [ In reply to ]
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synthetic wrote:
Derekl wrote:
synthetic wrote:
Tsunami wrote:
Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.

> A damn fine point, Sir!


Van Gogh didn't cut his ear off due to absinthe directly, but rather that at the time it was distilled with copper pipes/containers. This leached into the absinthe. It has been found that excess copper does cause brain danage


While super duper interesting (really....), that's not even remotely relevant to the discussion, and I was making a joke.

You're a weird dude.


I know, but that Ayurveda witch doctor is not

So you believe excess copper leached from drinking vessels will cure the OP's several year old iron deficiency anemia?
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Re: iron deficiency anemia [Derekl] [ In reply to ]
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Derekl wrote:
synthetic wrote:
Derekl wrote:
synthetic wrote:
Tsunami wrote:
Also Moscow Mules are traditionally served out of copper mugs. Have you ever heard somebody complain about their anemia while drinking a Moscow Mule? I don't think so.

> A damn fine point, Sir!


Van Gogh didn't cut his ear off due to absinthe directly, but rather that at the time it was distilled with copper pipes/containers. This leached into the absinthe. It has been found that excess copper does cause brain danage


While super duper interesting (really....), that's not even remotely relevant to the discussion, and I was making a joke.

You're a weird dude.


I know, but that Ayurveda witch doctor is not

So you believe excess copper leached from drinking vessels will cure the OP's several year old iron deficiency anemia?

If I use term "witch doctor" it means I don't believe it.


http://www.coupleofathletes.com
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