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Training intensity during coronavirus surge
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Hello,
Currently in the city (and country) where I live there is an exponential increase of coronavirus cases in the last weeks. I saw that similar situations are within many countries and I was wondering if training intensity/volume should be reduced in order to not impact the immune system.
Tempo, long, etc. workouts are crucial for improvements but also are taking their toll on the immune system for a few days. I was wondering what kind of changes can be made within the training in order to lower the risk in case of coronavirus infection and also have some improvements to be ready when racing will be resumed.
Last edited by: nav|gator: Oct 17, 20 8:08
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [nav|gator] [ In reply to ]
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If you are below 45 and physically healthy, the risk of you getting sick to any serious degree is extremely low. Cut out the high intensity stuff if you are worried

https://www.strava.com/athletes/47783704
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [nav|gator] [ In reply to ]
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My view is that in general we should not train to the point of hurting immune system, so the same applies now vs before. But I am racing age group and not pro, and need energy for rest of life after training (inclusive of fighting germs around me). Generally for the last 15 years, my rule of thumb has been, ''end every workout in every sport like you can tack on a 5km run, but don't do that 5km run...save it for life outside training". It also sets things up better for tomorrow's workout and tomorrow's life stress load. I don't think there is any magic to prep immune system different, I think the stategy is minimize unneccessary contact and interactions or when we have them be smart about it (which also happens to be how to avoid the flu and other infections)
Last edited by: devashish_paul: Oct 15, 20 7:18
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [rsjrv99] [ In reply to ]
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rsjrv99 wrote:
If you are below 45 and physically healthy, the risk of you getting sick to any serious degree is extremely low. Cut out the high intensity stuff if you are worried


I would consider being hospitalized to qualify for "sick to any serious degree".
Information from the CDC is in opposition to your opinion.



The above poster is a physiologist employed by PEARL iZUMi. However, statements are not made on behalf of nor reflective of PEARL iZUMI in any manner... unless they're good, then they count.
Last edited by: xtrpickels: Oct 15, 20 7:29
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [xtrpickels] [ In reply to ]
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xtrpickels wrote:
I would consider being hospitalized to qualify for "sick to any serious degree".

What exactly do you think that graph means? What we'd like to know is the odds of getting infected, and if infected, the odds of it being serious... for an athlete... and you can't get anything from that graph. Way more 18-49 year olds than any other group shown for starters.

To the OPs question I see little reason for intense workouts now since there are no races.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [rruff] [ In reply to ]
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rruff wrote:
xtrpickels wrote:
I would consider being hospitalized to qualify for "sick to any serious degree".


What exactly do you think that graph means? What we'd like to know is the odds of getting infected, and if infected, the odds of it being serious... for an athlete... and you can't get anything from that graph. Way more 18-49 year olds than any other group shown for starters.

To the OPs question I see little reason for intense workouts now since there are no races.
...and that is why we are having so many issues right now.

I'm staring at that graph and for the life of me can't figure out where/how you've interpreted it the way you interpreted it.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [xtrpickels] [ In reply to ]
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This is as a percentage of hospital visits, meaning these are people went to a hospital. It displays no data on the standing health of the individuals, and we are speaking in context of a healthy athlete. There is good chance the majority of these individuals were not in good standing health. College campus rates of hospitalization are nearly zero, with positive cases being mild or a symptomatic.

Looking at the rates per age group from the same site, it is now about 1 in 100,000 ages 18-39 population being hospitalized for COVID, with a peak of 5 in July.

I’m quite grateful to see this disease not be as serious as a novel virus potentially could be. Younger people in good standing health are being shown to be extremely resilient

https://www.strava.com/athletes/47783704
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [nav|gator] [ In reply to ]
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If you don't have a comorbidity just train and don't be afraid.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [rsjrv99] [ In reply to ]
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rsjrv99 wrote:
If you are below 45 and physically healthy, the risk of you getting sick to any serious degree is extremely low. Cut out the high intensity stuff if you are worried

Why is the Big Ten requiring the following for all student-athletes diagnosed with COVID-19? Fear of lawsuits? Negative publicity? Because they have the $ to do this testing? Valid concerns regarding the risks of myocarditis associated with COVID-19?

From this release: All COVID-19 positive student-athletes will have to undergo comprehensive cardiac testing to include labs and biomarkers, ECG, Echocardiogram and a Cardiac MRI. Following cardiac evaluation, student-athletes must receive clearance from a cardiologist designated by the university for the primary purpose of cardiac clearance for COVID-19 positive student-athletes. The earliest a student-athlete can return to game competition is 21 days following a COVID-19 positive diagnosis.

From the articles I've read, including this NYT article from September, you don't have to be seriously ill with COVID-19 to be diagnosed with myocarditis after testing positive for COVID-19.

Until there is more data regarding the risks of long-term health effects from COVID-19, I'm being cautious. I've reduced my training load about 20% since April and 99% of my training has been at a moderate pace. I'm 61 and in excellent health for my age.
Last edited by: Mark Lemmon: Oct 16, 20 6:32
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [Dilbert] [ In reply to ]
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Dilbert wrote:
rruff wrote:
xtrpickels wrote:
I would consider being hospitalized to qualify for "sick to any serious degree".


What exactly do you think that graph means? What we'd like to know is the odds of getting infected, and if infected, the odds of it being serious... for an athlete... and you can't get anything from that graph. Way more 18-49 year olds than any other group shown for starters.

To the OPs question I see little reason for intense workouts now since there are no races.

...and that is why we are having so many issues right now.

I'm staring at that graph and for the life of me can't figure out where/how you've interpreted it the way you interpreted it.

You mean "meaningless"? For me to respond, you need to tell me what you think it means.

And I agree that a big part of the problem is the misuse of data and deriving "meaning" that doesn't exist.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [devashish_paul] [ In reply to ]
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devashish_paul wrote:
My view is that in general we should not train to the point of hurting immune system, so the same applies now vs before. But I am racing age group and not pro.

...my rule of thumb has been, ''end every workout in every sport like you can tack on a 5km run, but don't do that 5km run...save it for life outside training".

I wish everyone in my age group would train like this—forgetting what it's like to go hard, to go to failure.

If you're not gonna go hard on hard workouts, why even bother?

devashish_paul wrote:
I don't think there is any magic to prep immune system different, I think the stategy is minimize unneccessary contact and interactions or when we have them be smart about it (which also happens to be how to avoid the flu and other infections)
I do, however, agree 100% with this.

no sponsors | no races | nothing to see here
Last edited by: philly1x: Oct 15, 20 13:06
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [devashish_paul] [ In reply to ]
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devashish_paul wrote:
My view is that in general we should not train to the point of hurting immune system, so the same applies now vs before. But I am racing age group and not pro, and need energy for rest of life after training (inclusive of fighting germs around me). Generally for the last 15 years, my rule of thumb has been, ''end every workout in every sport like you can tack on a 5km run, but don't do that 5km run...save it for life outside training".
I think that it is possible after every hard workout to do a 5km easy run so I suppose you are referring to a 5km at medium-hard pace.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [nav|gator] [ In reply to ]
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I was wondering what kind of changes can be made within the training in order to lower the risk in case of coronavirus infection and also have some improvements to be ready when racing will be resumed.

Generally speaking there are few or no races of importance in many athletes foreseeable future. Triathlon like most endurance sports is dependent almost 100% on our aerobic fitness. Most triathletes never get anywhere near their maximum aerobic fitness in one sport, let alone three!!

Therefore - take the long view here. There really is no need for specific, detail oriented training - just putting in the time, day after day, is key. Just keep building that base. As one well known coach said early on in the Pandemic "It's all December training now" - meaning it's all Off-Season Base Training now and for the foreseeable future!

My suggestion - do some block training where for a few months - you ARE a runner, and then for the next few months you ARE a cyclist . . and so on. Do that focused on sport, as many days of the week as you can - perfect score - 7, and throw in one or two of the other two sports to keep a hand-in-the-game.

Have some fun with it and don't get too stressed out about it all!


Steve Fleck @stevefleck | Blog
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [rruff] [ In reply to ]
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rruff wrote:
xtrpickels wrote:
I would consider being hospitalized to qualify for "sick to any serious degree".


What exactly do you think that graph means? What we'd like to know is the odds of getting infected, and if infected, the odds of it being serious... for an athlete... and you can't get anything from that graph. Way more 18-49 year olds than any other group shown for starters.

To the OPs question I see little reason for intense workouts now since there are no races.

I think that it clearly illustrates that there is little to no practical visit in hospitalizations for the age group that the previous poster stated were at a lower risk.

I do not read anything further into it.

Assuming that you are in a "safe group" is like suggesting that it's safer to ride without a helmet because you can hear the traffic better. There are no safe groups.

Many, however, are looking for permission to retain a "normal" life based on fitness status (or other metric). I am not aware of concrete evidence to support this. I am also not willing to assume, hope, or wish that this is the case.

I feel that my risk of infection and complications therein are equal to all those around me, despite my age and fitness level.

I have friend who raced ultra-marathons and adventure races who is on supplemental oxygen 24/7 despite being 3 months post "recovery" (infected while caring for patients). I have an aunt who has died.

This is not changing my training, but it has changing my actions.

The above poster is a physiologist employed by PEARL iZUMi. However, statements are not made on behalf of nor reflective of PEARL iZUMI in any manner... unless they're good, then they count.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [Mark Lemmon] [ In reply to ]
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Mark Lemmon wrote:
rsjrv99 wrote:
If you are below 45 and physically healthy, the risk of you getting sick to any serious degree is extremely low. Cut out the high intensity stuff if you are worried

Why is the Big Ten requiring the following for all student-athletes diagnosed with COVID-19? Fear of lawsuits? Negative publicity? Because they have the $ to do this testing? Valid concerns regarding the risks of myocarditis associated with COVID-19?

From this release: All COVID-19 positive student-athletes will have to undergo comprehensive cardiac testing to include labs and biomarkers, ECG, Echocardiogram and a Cardiac MRI. Following cardiac evaluation, student-athletes must receive clearance from a cardiologist designated by the university for the primary purpose of cardiac clearance for COVID-19 positive student-athletes. The earliest a student-athlete can return to game competition is 21 days following a COVID-19 positive diagnosis.

From the articles I've read, including this NYT article from September, you don't have to be seriously ill with COVID-19 to be diagnosed with myocarditis after testing positive for COVID-19.

Until there is more data regarding the risks of long-term health effects from COVID-19, I'm being cautious. I've reduced my training load about 20% since April and 99% of my training has been at a moderate pace. I'm 61 and in excellent health for my age.


https://www.heart.org/en/news/2020/09/11/a-closer-look-at-covid-19-and-heart-complications-among-athletes

The above poster is a physiologist employed by PEARL iZUMi. However, statements are not made on behalf of nor reflective of PEARL iZUMI in any manner... unless they're good, then they count.
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Re: Training intensity during coronavirus surge [nav|gator] [ In reply to ]
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nav|gator wrote:
Hello,

Currently in the city (and country) where I live there is an exponential increase of coronavirus cases in the last weeks. I saw that similar situations are within many countries and I was wondering if training intensity/volume should be reduced in order to not impact the immune system.
Tempo, long, etc. workouts are crucial for improvements but also are taking their toll on the immune system for a few days. I was wondering what kind of changes can be made within the training in order to lower the risk in case of coronavirus infection and also have some improvements to be ready when racing will be resumed.


The vast majority of training will not have a negative impact on immune response.
However, there can be immunosuppression at very high levels of training.

You are likely to not experience a significant protective benefit from manipulating training volume and intensity unless you are on a highly stressful program.

The larger benefit will be from hygiene, mask use, and social distancing.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5911985/

The above poster is a physiologist employed by PEARL iZUMi. However, statements are not made on behalf of nor reflective of PEARL iZUMI in any manner... unless they're good, then they count.
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