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Tire pressure sensor from SRAM...
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Real time tire pressure monitoring system coming soon(June 1) by SRAM for road and mountain bikes... Pairs to cycling computer and/or smartphone with an accuracy of 2%, 10 grams per sensor for $199...

https://www.quarq.com/...goqfgc11h52cf1q059mu
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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That's really cool. However, I don't know how many people would buy it.

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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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LOL...next thing you know Thompson is going to put a scale in their seat posts to give you real time weight so you know how fat you are at any given time.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Jason N] [ In reply to ]
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LOL...that is hilarious...I'd trademark that quickly before you see it on Kickstarter.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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Would be interesting for cyclocross. Let’s see if Wout van Aert and team use it for the up coming season, as he is the marquee guy for SRAM.

Alex Arman

Strava
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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Pretty dang pricey. For mid ride use, seems to me that only knowing about a significant drop would be worthwhile.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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Yeah DCRainmaker said sweet spot for that is 99 for the pair...someone wrote in the comments..."a solution in search of a problem" lol. I love gadgets but I can't see myself spending even 99 USD for that.....

"see the world as it is not as you want it to be"
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [doublea334] [ In reply to ]
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doublea334 wrote:
Would be interesting for cyclocross. Let’s see if Wout van Aert and team use it for the up coming season, as he is the marquee guy for SRAM.

The more I think about it, this is meant for riders running tubeless or tubular with sealant. Assuming you get a puncture that the sealant fixes, and you lost some pressure in the process, your computer can let you know you need to add air or in the case of a pro CX rider, get a new bike in the pits next lap. I think mountain bikers would use this most to quickly verify pressure before dropping into a gnarly section that could have them end up in the hospital.

For general road riding with tubed wheels...it doesn't make sense.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks for the heads up.

Doesn't seem like it would work(fit) for my Hed C3's or any Deep rim.


"Good genes are not a requirement, just the obsession to beat ones brains out daily"...the Griz
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Jason N] [ In reply to ]
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I'm not paying $199 but this would be pretty useful. Think about it, most serious cyclists are (rightly) obsessed with tire pressure but we actually have no accurate data on what pressures we are really using at any given time. You pump up to X but then drop by some unknown amount when you take the pump off. Then, you go out and ride for hours on tires we know lose some pressure over time even if they are not damaged in some way and we often ride in wildly changing temperatures which might affect pressures. Now, those who really care can know what their pressures are over the course of an entire ride and, since the data syncs, among other things it will make analyzing various pressures with performance easier. Some folks will be able to make great use of that data. And then there is the side benefit of knowing your tires are holding air before some critical time like before a high speed decent . . ..

Way too pricey for most but a great little gadget.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [STP] [ In reply to ]
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STP wrote:
I'm not paying $199 but this would be pretty useful. Think about it, most serious cyclists are (rightly) obsessed with tire pressure but we actually have no accurate data on what pressures we are really using at any given time. You pump up to X but then drop by some unknown amount when you take the pump off. Then, you go out and ride for hours on tires we know lose some pressure over time even if they are not damaged in some way and we often ride in wildly changing temperatures which might affect pressures. Now, those who really care can know what their pressures are over the course of an entire ride and, since the data syncs, among other things it will make analyzing various pressures with performance easier. Some folks will be able to make great use of that data. And then there is the side benefit of knowing your tires are holding air before some critical time like before a high speed decent . . ..

Way too pricey for most but a great little gadget.

An anal cyclist will check their pressure with a quality pump before each ride. A quality pump costs way less than $200, and it actually pumps up your tires too! You don't lose pressure when you take the pump head off the valve unless you have a crappy pump head or a bent valve core. The "hissing" sound you hear is the pressure releasing from the hose of the pump, not coming out of the tube.

Tire pressure doesn't actually change that much during a ride even with regards to temperature over the course of many hours. And even if you did...what are you actually going to do about it. Pull over and crack a CO2 just to add 2 psi? Or bust out a hand pump?

As per my first sarcastic reply...perhaps we should develop a seat post that also acts as a body weight scale. Because we don't have accurate data on how our weight fluctuates mid ride as we sweat, drink, eat, and burn off calories. If you're going to be that meticulous about tire pressure mid ride, then you also need to know exactly how much you weigh at that same point in time.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [BryanD] [ In reply to ]
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BryanD wrote:
That's really cool. However, I don't know how many people would buy it.

I had an unusually tough time on the last 20 mile ride of a full iron. When I picked up my bike after the race, the rear wheel was completely flat. I don't know if it was going flat during the ride and I was too dazed to notice, but I'd have killed at that moment to know if I had a slow leak.

But $200? Nope. I'd do $50 for a pair.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Jason N] [ In reply to ]
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Jason N wrote:
And even if you did...what are you actually going to do about it. Pull over and crack a CO2 just to add 2 psi? Or bust out a hand pump?

Yeah, the only use-cases I can see are for pros. In cyclocross you could go in for a bike exchange before your pressure goes critically bad.

I could see a team car in pro road racing having a tablet with the tire pressure telemetry of all their riders, so they can be in the right place quicker for the wheel exchange.

But those are extreme edge cases. We're talking Wout Van Aert and Peter Sagan.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Jason N] [ In reply to ]
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Jason N wrote:
STP wrote:
I'm not paying $199 but this would be pretty useful. Think about it, most serious cyclists are (rightly) obsessed with tire pressure but we actually have no accurate data on what pressures we are really using at any given time. You pump up to X but then drop by some unknown amount when you take the pump off. Then, you go out and ride for hours on tires we know lose some pressure over time even if they are not damaged in some way and we often ride in wildly changing temperatures which might affect pressures. Now, those who really care can know what their pressures are over the course of an entire ride and, since the data syncs, among other things it will make analyzing various pressures with performance easier. Some folks will be able to make great use of that data. And then there is the side benefit of knowing your tires are holding air before some critical time like before a high speed decent . . ..

Way too pricey for most but a great little gadget.

An anal cyclist will check their pressure with a quality pump before each ride. A quality pump costs way less than $200, and it actually pumps up your tires too! You don't lose pressure when you take the pump head off the valve unless you have a crappy pump head or a bent valve core. The "hissing" sound you hear is the pressure releasing from the hose of the pump, not coming out of the tube.

Tire pressure doesn't actually change that much during a ride even with regards to temperature over the course of many hours. And even if you did...what are you actually going to do about it. Pull over and crack a CO2 just to add 2 psi? Or bust out a hand pump?

As per my first sarcastic reply...perhaps we should develop a seat post that also acts as a body weight scale. Because we don't have accurate data on how our weight fluctuates mid ride as we sweat, drink, eat, and burn off calories. If you're going to be that meticulous about tire pressure mid ride, then you also need to know exactly how much you weigh at that same point in time.

That has interesting implications for things like Zwift racing. Monitor continuously through a ride and it would be difficult to just take a little pressure off the saddle during the initial weigh in.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Jason N] [ In reply to ]
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...and the only other thing I can think is the data logged over time might be useful. You could conceivably use the data combined with logged power meter and "aero stick" data to then calculate what tire pressure gave you optimal rolling resistance. It would just be a convenience in that case, though.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [trail] [ In reply to ]
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trail wrote:
...and the only other thing I can think is the data logged over time might be useful. You could conceivably use the data combined with logged power meter and "aero stick" data to then calculate what tire pressure gave you optimal rolling resistance. It would just be a convenience in that case, though.

I suppose that would be a valid case...assuming that this thing reads accurately while the wheel is in motion and the tire/tube compresses near the valve on every rotation. Seems like a cumbersome thing to apply to your tube just because you're too lazy to manually record what your floor pump says before each run though.

I for sure wouldn't want to use this while training on a normal tube. Can't imagine having to unscrew this thing (and likely put it in my pocket) just to change a flat. I'm sure as hell not reapplying plumbers tape and using any tools to thread this thing back on a spare tube with a removable core on the side of the road.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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Hello Tony5 and All,

Neat but too big ... It is not so much the price that causes me to hesitate buying .... but rather size and weight.

I do not know how to make it .... yet .... but channeling on the pocket size tire pressure gauges that have a graduated part that extends to indicate pressure ...




Price $2.27



Perhaps this design with the little graduated part that is visible located in a streamlined clear valve extender weighing only a couple of grams.

It could be colored green in the acceptable pressure area to make it quick reading ... and so you would not have to stop to read the tire pressure ..... for on the fly pressure data ..... the little pressure data stick could cover a small hole when in the acceptable pressure range ..... when out of acceptable range the little uncovered hole would whistle .... giving you an audible warning of low tire pressure.

Simple, cheap, effective.

Another solution would be a very light graphene cartridge filled with Nitrogen located inside a self sealing tubeless tire with a pressure sensing valve that released the Nitrogen any time the pressure in the tire fell below a certain level. You do not really need to know the pressure .... you just want the pressure to automatically remain optimum.

Or better yet .... a tire with good Crr elastic properties that did not require inflation and would not flat ..... and throw away pumps, tire gauges, self sealing fluids, patching kits, etc.

Any thoughts?

Cheers, Neal

+1 mph Faster
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Jason N] [ In reply to ]
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What would be cool is the combination of both. You can loose a race for not taking into account the effect on real tyre pressure of weight loss due to sweating, farting or snorting. A must have!
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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https://www.dcrainmaker.com/...pressure-sensor.html

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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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I'll bet you this was pretty easy for Quarq to develop. They already have their ShockWiz device for MTB suspension tuning which basically does the same thing. That is measuring air pressures and transmitting them to a phone. The form of it even looks similar. I'll bet since they already had the tech it was straightforward for them to make what is arguably a simpler device, so there wasn't much cost to them. Agree with DCrainmaker that $99 is probably about the right price, but I'll be they don't have to sell a ton of these to make it worth their while.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Tony5] [ In reply to ]
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I see it being hugely valuable for gravel racing where you often start on the road - and want higher pressure - and then want to drop it down once you get on the gravel and enduro/grinduro events where you may want to change pressure between segments.

Peloton Gravel Mob up in Ojai was exactly this type of event. You want higher pressure for the first half but definitely lower for Sisar Canyon, which is quite technical, in the back half.

I should have one coming for an upcoming series on gravel equipment that I'm doing, and this is my proposed use case. Silca's BLE version of the Tattico fills a similar role IMO.


"Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift

Ask me about: 1st Endurance | Normatec - $100 off RAPP2019 | Zipp | Quarq | SRAM
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [jsoderman] [ In reply to ]
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Quote:
I'll bet you this was pretty easy for Quarq to develop

Probably right. You can get a 4 tire Bluetooth system for your car on Amazon for $50 . . . . . Wireless tire pressure monitoring technology is a pretty mundane thing at this point.
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Rappstar] [ In reply to ]
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Rappstar wrote:
I see it being hugely valuable for gravel racing where you often start on the road - and want higher pressure - and then want to drop it down once you get on the gravel and enduro/grinduro events where you may want to change pressure between segments.

Peloton Gravel Mob up in Ojai was exactly this type of event. You want higher pressure for the first half but definitely lower for Sisar Canyon, which is quite technical, in the back half.

I should have one coming for an upcoming series on gravel equipment that I'm doing, and this is my proposed use case. Silca's BLE version of the Tattico fills a similar role IMO.

I like the product also, but are you suggesting people are going to get off their bike and "air down" once they hit a rougher section on the course? I've done quite a bit of gravel racing, and I can't think of a race where that would have been a good idea! The lead group isn't going to wait for me. Or maybe we all agree to stop so we can adjust our tire pressure together and call it the air down neutral zone!

Obviously the ultimate would be to have the ability to adjust your pressure during the ride and have an accurate readout. I think there was a company trying to get a product like this going last year.

I do approximately 150 hours of fatbiking on snow during the winter on mainly unmaintained single track, so I personally could see a use for this for fatbiking! It's amazing how much the snow can vary on different trails during the same ride - not to mention if you need to ride on pavement for portions of the ride. Depending on conditions, it's not uncommon for me to adjust my pressure 3 or 4 times. It would be nice to know what the pressure actually is while you are out there. The actual pressure out riding will also be significantly different if you air your tires up in your house at 20 Celsius and then ride at -15 Celsius. I wonder if this product has a temperature limit - it's not uncommon for me to ride at -25 Celsius.

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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Bonesbrigade] [ In reply to ]
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Bonesbrigade wrote:
Rappstar wrote:
I see it being hugely valuable for gravel racing where you often start on the road - and want higher pressure - and then want to drop it down once you get on the gravel and enduro/grinduro events where you may want to change pressure between segments.

Peloton Gravel Mob up in Ojai was exactly this type of event. You want higher pressure for the first half but definitely lower for Sisar Canyon, which is quite technical, in the back half.

I should have one coming for an upcoming series on gravel equipment that I'm doing, and this is my proposed use case. Silca's BLE version of the Tattico fills a similar role IMO.

I like the product also, but are you suggesting people are going to get off their bike and "air down" once they hit a rougher section on the course? I've done quite a bit of gravel racing, and I can't think of a race where that would have been a good idea! The lead group isn't going to wait for me. Or maybe we all agree to stop so we can adjust our tire pressure together and call it the air down neutral zone!

Obviously the ultimate would be to have the ability to adjust your pressure during the ride and have an accurate readout. I think there was a company trying to get a product like this going last year.

I do approximately 150 hours of fatbiking on snow during the winter on mainly unmaintained single track, so I personally could see a use for this for fatbiking! It's amazing how much the snow can vary on different trails during the same ride - not to mention if you need to ride on pavement for portions of the ride. Depending on conditions, it's not uncommon for me to adjust my pressure 3 or 4 times. It would be nice to know what the pressure actually is while you are out there. The actual pressure out riding will also be significantly different if you air your tires up in your house at 20 Celsius and then ride at -15 Celsius. I wonder if this product has a temperature limit - it's not uncommon for me to ride at -25 Celsius.

In my - albeit limited - experience, the front group typically has had a pee break of some kind that typically coincided with a spot where you could also get some aid and possibly air down/up. And certainly for more casual riders, I think taking a quick break to air down is entirely possible.

Likewise, I can also see some value if you had a slow leaker and you were wondering if you needed to air up, this would tell you whether or not you were clear to keep rolling or not...


"Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift

Ask me about: 1st Endurance | Normatec - $100 off RAPP2019 | Zipp | Quarq | SRAM
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Re: Tire pressure sensor from SRAM... [Rappstar] [ In reply to ]
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I haven't encountered the pee break zone or aid station stop in any of the races I've done - though I haven't done any long ones - all under 100km. For sure, the longer events would likely have those natural breaks to allow small pressure adjustments without any consequence.

Cool product nonetheless.

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