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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [fulla] [ In reply to ]
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fulla wrote:
I have to admit my blood glucose levels are usually better when I am on a break as my routine is consistent day in day out - the exercise level doesn't change because I do none. But I'm not using a low carb diet then, just using a diet which sees me eat the same amounts of carbs at meals so that I'm not changing anything on a day to day basis.

Agreed 100% and I'm sure this is the case for all T1D. The more you train, the more of a "normal training plan" you follow, messier your levels will be.

Doing 5-7 days of 1h of running (or anything else) at the same time of the day is far superior to control BG levels rather than the usual training plan that shifts in between a long 4-7h day to 1h the day after.

I understand that there is more to life other than tight BG control, but its also important to adjust your training and routine around your diabetes rather than just say "we can have it normal like everyone else".

--
Vinnie Santana, Coach
http://www.ironguides.net
* * * Your best is our business. * * *
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [vinnie] [ In reply to ]
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yep, that's why I try to have the same/similar type of workouts on the same day each week so that I can track trends etc. I'm a bit bad with sometimes choosing to eat more though, ice cream in particular!

have also found that chocolate milk has a tendency to enter my system VERY quickly after a workout, despite injections to offset its impact on blood glucose.

certain foods are also terrible - like large amounts of pizza, chinese takeaways, pasta...I can in fact go low from the 'slow absorbtion' but then will be in the 20s an hour to 4 hours later as the carbs get absorbed.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [fulla] [ In reply to ]
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fulla wrote:
yep, that's why I try to have the same/similar type of workouts on the same day each week so that I can track trends etc. I'm a bit bad with sometimes choosing to eat more though, ice cream in particular!

have also found that chocolate milk has a tendency to enter my system VERY quickly after a workout, despite injections to offset its impact on blood glucose.

certain foods are also terrible - like large amounts of pizza, chinese takeaways, pasta...I can in fact go low from the 'slow absorbtion' but then will be in the 20s an hour to 4 hours later as the carbs get absorbed.

Training a similar energy system same day is a good idea, I try and do that. Morning is usually a high aerobic intensity (call it threshold) and afternoons speed/strength work. But then even the discipline changes the impact on things.

Swimming is by far the most effective to control BG, during and after
Running spikes my BG during but makes it good to control after
Cycling doesnt spike during, but not as efficient to keep low BG after

A high fat diet has allowed be to eat smaller meals per meal, which facilitates the absorption rate of carbs and proteins. I also try to stay well fueled during long sessions to avoid feeling hungry and overeating once I'm done. On along ride will take cheese, nuts, coconutmilk+ucan and some bcaa, may need to bolus 2x0.5u, then eat as small as usual straight after.

--
Vinnie Santana, Coach
http://www.ironguides.net
* * * Your best is our business. * * *
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [fulla] [ In reply to ]
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the spike is likely to be due to the cortisol secreted post exercise

for me at least it's all about self experimentation. I agree a routine is easier, it would be easier to go shopping if you ate the same meal three times a day, dressing would be easier if you only had one outfit sometimes what's easier isn't what's desirable.


I think it all comes down to outlook, I want to achieve the most I can with my life, to see the world, to help people and to excel in my sport. I will make my diabetes fit with those goals. If above all things i wanted to maintain a lower a1c maybe i would approach life differently. Health has a mental component and giving up on your dreams and accepting diabetes as a limiter not only unnecessarily limits your goals it also negatively influences your relationship with your diabetes which could in turn upset your BG management, and make you sad enough to eat ice cream ;)


oh and the delayed pizza bolus is an art form, I'm also a big advocate of the pizza and beer combo, as the beer brings you down the pizza kicks in.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [vinnie] [ In reply to ]
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Hi everyone, timely thread for me. Very recent routine blood work indicated high sugars. I am still waiting for follow up and additional results. I am floored because I never had a bad diet and my numbers are all over the place without discernable rhyme or reason. Just wondering if anyone knows of a good reference book/ website / whatever particular to athletes. These numbers are driving me nuts and some info might help. Th.ank
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [caffeinator] [ In reply to ]
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have you had type 1 sort of symptoms (eg thirst, weight loss, blurred vision etc)? or are you thinking type 2?
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [caffeinator] [ In reply to ]
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caffeinator wrote:
Hi everyone, timely thread for me. Very recent routine blood work indicated high sugars. I am still waiting for follow up and additional results. I am floored because I never had a bad diet and my numbers are all over the place without discernable rhyme or reason. Just wondering if anyone knows of a good reference book/ website / whatever particular to athletes. These numbers are driving me nuts and some info might help. Th.ank

What are you seeing ? Low morning numbers ? All day ? How high, how low ?

How did they diagnose ? Morning fasting or A1C or OGTT test ?

I have 2 books from which I learned some stuff but a lot is trial and error and from fellow diabetics on the internet. I suspect several people on this thread can help you figure some stuff out.

Books I read

Diabetic Athlete's Handbook by Sheri Colberg
Diabetes Solutions by Dr Bernstein.

I am 50, type 2 since 1998.
BTW, finding a doctor that knew something about endurnace sports and diabetes was/is a real challenge for me,
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [runnerwv] [ In reply to ]
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Hi all,

Paul Buchanan here, Founder of Team Blood Glucose.

dx Jan 28th 2012 at the age of 44

A1c on dx was 13.4% (in old money) fasting bloods were 17.6mmol/l

Started on 1 shot of levimir (24u) in the evening and fixed bolus of 6u per meal.

Self taught carb counting and by month 3 was MDI split levimir am/pm (8u/8u) and novorapid I:C 1:10 next A1c was 5.1%

In Sept 2012 did my first Olympic tri after doing a course on Sports & Exercise with Ian Gallen (Endo)/Carin Hume (Dietician) sponsored by Animas (pump makers) at Loughborough University.

Was quite proud of my 2:47:20 time!

March 2013 went onto pump - Animas Vibe & self fund Dexcom G4 CGM, also founded Team Blood Glucose (for all PWD).

2013 - Wellington Sprint Tri, BUPA 10k, Exmoor 70.3, 2,400km cycle from Brussels to Barcelona with Team Blood Glucose (TeamBG),

2014 - Half Marathon, Marathon, Exmoor 70.3, Zurich Ironman, another cycle from Barcelona to Vienna (EASD conference to conference tour), about 2,400km - route/event still being planned.

Have managed to maintain an A1c of c5% for the last 18mths - am a LowCarber except when exercising/training/eventing when I consume c 60g Carbs/hour at a HR of c130-150 which goes up to 90+ carbs/hour if HR above 160

When doing endurance training/events I reduce basal by 80-90% (or as low as the pump will allow) and do not bolus for any thing I eat during exercise.


Triathlete, wanna-be Ironman, sailor, cyclist, swimmer, runner and beekeeper (oh the sweet irony!)

Really keen to learn from and share with others how to live a healthier/stronger/safer life with diabetes

http://www.teambloodglucose.com
Empower:Connect:Support:Educate
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [TeamBG] [ In reply to ]
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Hi Paul, love the team BG gear! Tri gear would be great!
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [TeamBG] [ In reply to ]
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Paul - I've just looked up your website for Team Blood Glucose. Well done mate, you've done a great job there.

I was diagnosed in June this year having completed IM Wales last September. I've got Challenge Roth coming up next summer as well as a mountain marathon in the Autumn

I'm interested to know how you ended up with a pump. I asked my consultant about pumps and was told I don't meet the criteria as I'm controlling my b/s well with injections. Also, I see your CGM is self funded. How much did it set you back? Would you recommend them for races? I don't fancy stopping loads during an IM to test blood sugar levels...

Interesting to see how much you reduce your levemir and bolus during an event. I'm guessing you're not going hypo. However do you have any figures for how high your b/s gets if you're taking on 60g CHO per hr?

All information welcome as I'm going to be beginning my IM prep in the New Year.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [p206751] [ In reply to ]
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I consume about the same carb per hour, 50-75g, some times more. During b2b full a few weeks ago when I tested I ranged from 80-145 but most were in the 120's. Probably tested 10 times during the event

I used Perpetum on the bike(6 bottles YUCK) along with some Hammer gel and I also like to mix in GU gels because it has 15% simple sugar and caffeine.

Through lots and lots of testing I have learned that I need at least 25g carb every 20-30 min



"Keep those feet moving!" Me
Last edited by: runnerwv: Nov 8, 13 7:09
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [vinnie] [ In reply to ]
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vinnie wrote:
Swimming is by far the most effective to control BG, during and after
Running spikes my BG during but makes it good to control after
Cycling doesnt spike during, but not as efficient to keep low BG after

A quick introduction about me. I'm 34. Was diagnosed almost exactly a year ago, type I - LADA. I've raced 3 IM in the past, more HIM than I can count, tons of endurance cycling etc. I'm racing my first diabetic IM next week in AZ and planning to use it as a learning experience.

I think it's great that resources such as this thread allow us all to find another and discuss these topics. It really is amazing the progress. I'm am incredible grateful for those who have tested the boundaries and been brave enough to achieve the success that they have had. Every diabetic is different, physically and mentally. Hell, I'm different depending on the day - but that said I'm also going to vouch for Vinnie and the benefits of being low carb and ketogenic adapted.

I have also been pursuing this strategy, admitted I'm new to the scene so I know my place. However, how I choose to care for myself is my decision. I'm not here to pressure anyone else to do things my way, but it works for me. My goal is to try to preserve my beta cells - hell I'll openly admit that I'd love to reverse this thing. Even if that's an unrealistic or unobtainable goal it still leaves me with my health.

I'm not saying it's unhealthy to treat your diabetes in the traditional manner, but for me I want to pay due respects to the 80 year old future me. I don't want to (in my opinion) risk my long-term healthy by exercising with BG's in the 140's. I am able to train in the 80-100 range very well. I do not experience any rapid hypos, and if I do ever go low I can just stop or slow down and my body will auto-correct. Vinnie's comments about the law of small numbers is only part of the benefit. The real benefit in my view is that being adapted to burning ketones as a primary fuel source means that my body can handle them and actually use them.

There is more to it than just 'low carb'. I've trained by body to burn fat (in the form beta-hydroxybutyrate). So not only do I not get high BGs from food, although high intensity intervals do cause a bump, I'm protected from lows. I guess I can't prove this, but I am putting my life on the line that I am more protected from lows. I haven't ever been low to a point where I haven't been able to think clearly and care for myself (again, this is year 1 so knock on wood) It's not a hypo unawareness issue, it's that my brain and body aren't choked off from their only fuel source. There was an interesting study I read about in "Good Calories, Bad Calories" where they took patients who they ketoadapted through starvation for a couple weeks and then administered enough insulin to take their BG's below 20, and they apparently suffered no neurological deficit - I think this was in the 1930's since you can't fund that study these days! Not that it's my goal to ever go that low, but if I do I'd rather not go into a coma.

My blood ketones are consistently in the 0.5-2.5mM range, no where near the 15mM DKA risk category. I feel better and perform better at 80 than over 140. I get stronger as a workout duration increases - I feel like a big diesel engine. Admittedly I'm probably a small portion of my anaerobic metabolism, but I've also upregulated my aerobic (just through diet!). I should do a VO2 max test and measure my respiratory quotient - been wating on that since the first year of diagnosis is $$$. But I can tell I'm more aerobic while swimming and require less air, etc.

A note about CGM's. I use a dexcom G4, but it doesn't seem to tell me much. My theory is that this could be unique to the whole ketoadapted thing. It's great when sedentary, but once I'm 40 minutes into cycling workout the CGM shows that I've dropped below 50 while blood values show me still in the 100's. This could be related to my ketoadaptation, either way it doesn't tell me what I need to know for it to be a reliable tool during exercise. Maybe my interstitial glucose values really are 40's, but I was knocking out killer hill repeats feeling very strong the last time that occurred.

Other benefits beyond and up-regulated aerobic capacity is that I'm noticeably less inflamed now. No more allergies - I can breath though both nostrils at the same time! My flexibility increased which I thought was crazy (I got better at yoga while not actually practicing?! ), my energy is very steady - I can miss a meal and not be hungry and have stable BG values, I could fast for a day and train just fine.

Now again, I'm not forgetting that I'm still new at this. I was likely honeymooning a bit, and hopefully I still am and will continue to for the rest of my life. Right now I'm using an OmniPod (no tubes!) and run a 0.4U/hr basal. I set a temp basal of 0.15u/hr for aerobic efforts. I turn that temp basal on 30-45 minutes pre-workout before swim and bike, but time it at the start for runs. I experience similar BG effect that I quoted from Vinnie above. For high intensity workouts or short runs I don't reduce a temp basal.

With my first diabetic ironman next week I did 4400 swim yesterday. By swimming a comfortable easy pace my BG dropped from 90 to 70 and my splits where nice and consistent. Normally I'd do that distance in about 65 minutes - but yesterday's pace time was 75 minutes. Then for shits and giggles I did a hard anaerobict 200yd effort to finish my workout. By the time I was dressed I was back up to 90 from the intensity. That's pretty cool in my mind. (using my own glucagon rather than injecting).

As for losing 10 minutes in my swim - I don't care. I'll be stopping to test on the bike. I'll be happy with a 6hr+ split (where as I know I could probably ride sub 5:15, at least I could pre-diagnosis). And I'll just be happy to finish the run.

Its funny how I feel a little pressure to prove that this strategy works by actually going all out, but it's not worth the risk to me. I have a much longer term vision. Maybe I'll go harder in IMWI'15. There is hopefully going to be a big group participating.

Oh, and more details. My A1C after my first year is down to 5.6%. I eat mostly fat. Typical meals: Breakfast is either bacon and eggs with kale in coconut oil or lard. Lunch (if I need it) is a salad with olive oil and vinegar dressing perhaps with avocado and sardines on top. Dinner is usually a home-made soup from bone broth with non starchy veggies, maybe 6-8oz of pork, fish, or steak (sometime liver). Snacks are almonds, macademia nuts, or a spoonful of coconut oil with nutbutter and/or chia. Dessert is coconut milk chia seed pudding with cinnamon and cocoa powder mixed in. And I admit to putting kerry gold butter in my coffee if I'm in a hurry.

Sorry for the length of my post. Again, I think it's amazing that we can all share this info. I'm so happy to read what Vinnie has posted because it reflects what I too have learned and experienced. We all have a choice in how we care for ourselves. And even if you choose the HCLF strategy, your better off than someone who chooses no strategy and doesn't exercise. We are all doing the best we can. I'm just glad to have the choice. It was hard for me to find info on choosing this method so hopefully my words (and Vinnie's) will help explain this option to anyone else that might be interested.

If you sadistically want to read more about me I do write a blog at koryseder.blogspot.com. I think I'm just going to post this as a blog as well - wholly manifesto!

I'm not on ST much anymore, just happened to check in for info on AZ (water temps, etc), but I'll follow this thread - good timing I guess! And from my blog address I'm easy to find on FB. Good luck everyone! I know how afraid I was a year ago - and it's due to the work of all of you that I have the confidence to continue on in the sport that I love, hopefully for a long time to come.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [p206751] [ In reply to ]
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Type 1 diabetic Diagnosed at 36 in 2004.
Currently using a pump and occasional CGM. I initially got both fully funded in the UK (yay NHS!) but have been living in Australia for the last 3 years so have had to self fund my CGM during that time :-( Back in the UK now and have my first endo appointment in a couple of weeks so maybe I'll be able to get the CGM again.

Did Strongman Japan on MDI, done numerous running events from half marathons up to 60km on both MDI and pump. Find that for me, I need to drop my basal levels during events, the shorter the event, the more I need to reduce the basal level - intensity related I guess.

CGM is a godsend for marathons and anything greater. I make sure that I have it inserted a couple of days prior to the event so that I can be sure that it is properly calibrated and then I can monitor and adjust levels during a race without testing.

I have dropped low in marathons and still been able to finish in a good time. Once (pre pump) I found I was at 1.9 (that's 35 in US numbers) at the 25km point during London Marathon but taking on board a good amount of carbs at the aid station was still able to finish about 3:40. Not something to recommend though!

I was living in Japan at the time of diagnosis. My wife thinks it was doing Marathon des Sables 6 months earlier that triggered the T1, I think I picked up something from all the mossie bites I was getting over the Japanese summer. In the end, we are unlikely to ever know the cause, we just need to live with the results.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [non_sequitur] [ In reply to ]
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How much carb do you consume during activity? And what do you consume?

I think its wise you are planning on taking it "easy" at IMAZ and testing frequently

I just did B2B full Oct 26 less than 3 months after being diagnosed. I took a very easy and relaxed approach and finished 13:21. No issues.

I am almost done with my race report. Its taken forever(5 pages) because I'm trying to be detailed on what I did nutritionally and testing in hopes it can help other diabetics in some way.



"Keep those feet moving!" Me
Last edited by: runnerwv: Nov 9, 13 4:23
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [runnerwv] [ In reply to ]
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runnerwv wrote:
How much carb do you consume during activity? And what do you consume?

I think its wise you are planning on taking it "easy" at IMAZ and testing frequently

I just did B2B full Oct 26 less than 3 months after being diagnosed. I took a very easy and relaxed approach and finished 13:21. No issues.

I am almost done with my race report. Its taken forever(5 pages) because I'm trying to be detailed on what I did nutritionally and testing in hopes it can help other diabetics in some way.


So far I've only consumed minimal carbs during training, but most of my training has been at a very relaxed pace as well. I plan to use UCAN during the race and have tested that a couple of times such as during the Horribly Hilly Hundreds 200km ride (also ate two 4oz packets of wholly guacomole,) and a 2.4 mile practice swim at a faster pace. I did a 150 mile training ride on nothing but some almonds at the halfway point and then I sucked on a date or two every hour.

I'll have my bacon and eggs for breakfast and then have 2 servings of UCAN early on the bike depending on how my body reacts to the swim. I'll carry extra UCAN in powder, and planning on another 2 servings of UCAN at halfway. I'll maintain an emergency supply of a couple of Bonk Breakers on me at all times, but I'll only use them as needed, further reducing my basal if I trend low.

Since bike to run transition causes a bump of about 30-40 points I'm hoping to target 80-90 mg/dL at the 90-100 mile mark at which I'll cancel my temp basal (currently 0.4U/hr) for about 90 minutes. Once my body begins to settle in to running (about mile 3 or 4), I'll hope to turn the temp basal back down to about 0.1U/hr, knock back more UCAN and then carry on.

This 'plan' isn't set in stone. The only way for me to know a good plan would be to have done this before. I have an outline and the plan is to adjust. During training my body has had the ability to compensate to produce or access it's own carbs whether it's the muscle glycogen, or liver glycogen from gluconeogenisis. I'm aware that it could theoretically run out of these limited reserves, it just hasn't happened to me yet, in part do to increase metabolic efficiency and all the other compensatory factors of being ketoadapted.

My longest training run was 16 miles. I consumed only water (and electrolytes) during all training runs, even on an 80-12 brick. I understand things will probably be different for the full 26 after the swim and bike. So I'll likely consume at least two more servings of UCAN on the run, and carry a bonk breaker at all times.

That's why this one is considered research. Adding in the UCAN shouldn't bother my stomach. I've had an iron stomach in the past and used to be able to play soccer on taco night with little issue. The bit that I have tested UCAN was enough to confirm that I don't have any issues with that either. I'm a proponent of not doing anything new on Ironman day, but I'm comfortable with UCAN and it's very low osmolarity shouldn't cause any issues.

I'm usually about an 11hr finisher (pre-diagnosis and one while un-diagnosed), but I'm okay if this one takes 14 or more. A relaxed approach can actually be pretty fast since it usually leads to great pacing.
Last edited by: non_sequitur: Nov 9, 13 5:45
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [non_sequitur] [ In reply to ]
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I miss the days where I could workout and only take in water.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [amclean] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks Alan,

Hello ST, Coach Cliff Scherb here. My first post...ever and a long time coming but a long time ST reader and fan. Since this is T1 family here I thought I would finally chime in.

About me: Founder of TriStarAthletes.com, T1 Athlete and Coach, 9:07 IM PR, 4:16HIM, 17X IM finisher, Kona 2X.... Coached 100's of athletes, coached for Team Type 1 and Triabetes.... live the endurance diabetic life day in day out.

A little bit more about me. some of you may know some of this already......as a life long athlete, I have been testing different insulin strategies for racing at the elite level as a triathlete/diabetic. My day job is a triathlon coach/athlete and founder of TriStar Athletes LLC. (A coaching company for athletes) . I work out of our training Lab in Connecticut, creating insulin training plans based on my experiences for my athletes with metabolic cart testing. To date all athletes have seen better A1C's as well as less lows-highs and variability during training and racing.

I have codified exercise and carbohydrate demands to the highest degree; from my early days using syringes, to a more precise approach with a pump regimen. The templates and algorithms I have been using are tested on myself and my athletes. At its core, the testing and modeling takes into consideration, weight, age, heart rate, and insulin to carbohydrate ratios. Behind this data is also a methodology and practice that helps tie in insulin and activity. (I currently am a consultant to several insulin pump companies.)

With this tool I have been able to give precise recommendations to athletes of any ability and in any dimension of activity. (I create individual race/event insulin plans based on intensity, distance, metabolic efficiency, and experience. See sample plan)

Diabetic Coaching Site:

Diabetes and Exercise Conference Video - "Go Go Gadgets" (2013 San Diego Insulindependence Seminar)

Video of T1 Consulting

Currently, we are in the the long term process of getting real time app functionality for closed loop technology. (artificial pancreas) Someday your Garmin/Training Peaks/Insulin pump, CGM will all talk in real time with the cloud and control your pump..... until that day, I hope I can help!

~Cliff Scherb

★★★TriStarAthletes.com
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [runnerwv] [ In reply to ]
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Karma. I was beaten around the head with it today. Did Mandurah 70.3 and had had trouble with my blood sugars. First time in a long time, i didnt have enough insulin on board. Had my normal 8 units of Lantus, 1 unit Novorapid to cover breakfast. Prior to start the nervousness etc got me to 9.7mmols. Swim went ok but i fell to peices on the bike. Throughout the whole ride i only required 4 jelly beans to keep my bsugar up. To me, that is unheard of. I was seeing readings in the 11mmols, which i really dont race well on. I even began to throw up mid ride but thats prob not diabetic related. Jumped off the bike into the run and quads cramped straight away. I knew that feeling. I was well hydrated, but it was that 'glucose cant get in' feeling. I had to pull out.
Im at a bit of a loss. I did a super-sprint race last week which only lasted 45 mins, but did quite well. Same insulin regime. Last year i did busselton 70.3 and was taking more insulin at that time. 10 units of lantus and 3 bolus units in the morn. I raced a good race on that.
So my question to my type 1 homies. Why can i race like a demon on the short stuff with my current insulin regime and do a 70.3 on 10 units of lantus and 3 bolus units. But fail miserably with 8 lantus units and 1 bolus? Didnt think it was that much difference (insulin amount)? Maybe i just had a shit day with the beetes?
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [coates_hbk] [ In reply to ]
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Just a follow up on this I'm very insulin resistant today despite pulling at the run. I feel like I have done a full ironman, like a truck has run me over. I am jabbing myself like crazy, having a shit of a time trying to bring blood sugars down, this is unusual after the swim and bike leg of a 70.3
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [marcag] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks for the references, need to check them out.

Thinking maybe I do need a doc who know a little something about endurance sports. Mine has really given me no guidance, just a referral.

My fasting glucose is usually off the wall high, then drops quite significantly throughout the day, especially if I get busy at work and skimp on lunch. I have never really been one to train with food and fluids other than water before so I'm even more puzzled as to handle workouts. Without nutrition on a ride/ run my sugar will be in the low 100's starting out, spike wicked high and then crash me through the floor. Well I am a newbie waiting for an appointment, this will all get figured out in time.

I wish I could find a pattern and fix it, I suppose the specialist will have other ideas though.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [caffeinator] [ In reply to ]
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How high is it spiking on run/bike?

How much insulin? What kind and how often?

When I was first given insulin I was going low all the time! I was taking too much insulin



"Keep those feet moving!" Me
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [coates_hbk] [ In reply to ]
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coates_hbk wrote:
Karma. I was beaten around the head with it today. Did Mandurah 70.3 and had had trouble with my blood sugars. First time in a long time, i didnt have enough insulin on board. Had my normal 8 units of Lantus, 1 unit Novorapid to cover breakfast. Prior to start the nervousness etc got me to 9.7mmols. Swim went ok but i fell to peices on the bike. Throughout the whole ride i only required 4 jelly beans to keep my bsugar up. To me, that is unheard of. I was seeing readings in the 11mmols, which i really dont race well on. I even began to throw up mid ride but thats prob not diabetic related. Jumped off the bike into the run and quads cramped straight away. I knew that feeling. I was well hydrated, but it was that 'glucose cant get in' feeling. I had to pull out.
Im at a bit of a loss. I did a super-sprint race last week which only lasted 45 mins, but did quite well. Same insulin regime. Last year i did busselton 70.3 and was taking more insulin at that time. 10 units of lantus and 3 bolus units in the morn. I raced a good race on that.
So my question to my type 1 homies. Why can i race like a demon on the short stuff with my current insulin regime and do a 70.3 on 10 units of lantus and 3 bolus units. But fail miserably with 8 lantus units and 1 bolus? Didnt think it was that much difference (insulin amount)? Maybe i just had a shit day with the beetes?

this days is behind me now, and for some reason im still having trouble bringing my blood sugars down. I dont feel sick or anything, but sheesh im hitting the needle like a junkie. Even if i had insulin on me during the race, i dont think it would have helped. I can see why perhaps people do race and inject at the same time now i guess. Im a bit beat up about this, very much at a loss why all of a sudden i have become an insulin whore on race day.
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [coates_hbk] [ In reply to ]
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What was BG #'s during the race?

Sorry you had a bad day

My friend and I ran a marathon yesterday and her BG was acting up. She started in the 300's, it went up into the 400's before coming down to 150ish

She said she was due for a a crappy day

I'm on 10 U Lantus per day as well and have opted to not take Lantus on race days. At least at this point



"Keep those feet moving!" Me
Last edited by: runnerwv: Nov 11, 13 4:35
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [runnerwv] [ In reply to ]
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started at 9.6mmols right before the swim. Had 1 bolus unit in the background pretty much cleared out. 8 units of lantus on board. Swam and felt ok, ran to transition with legs like lead. I knew something wasnt right. I could hardly run. Checked my bsugar and after a 30 odd minute swim i was at 6.5mmols. So the numbers were reading ok, but i really had no power on the bike. I just had no energy and was zapped. I had 1 jellybean and that took my bsugar from 6.5mmols to 11. Crazy from a single jelly bean. I was thirsty as hell too. Signs pointed to ketoacidosis, however my numbers werent off the charts high. I dont know, i dont get it. I was well rested, tapered (didnt up my lantus dose during taper when i probably could have by 1 or 2 units) and raring to go. The swim itself was fine. My legs were just shot. I hopped off the bike in T2 to see if i could run and i had really bad quad cramps. I ambled for a km. It took me over 6 minutes. It was a familiar feeling. Cramping because i couldnt get glucose into my muscles. I didnt have enough insulin on board it felt like. I was really nauses on the bike aswell. As mentioned before, i have raced a half on 10 units of lantus and nothing else and blitzed it. No go this time. Such a shit disease where you analyze everything when it goes wrong and still leaves you guessing


Edit: i was very insulin resistant that day and today too. You would think after doing such exercise you would need less insulin. But i have trippled my bolus dosage these past two days because my readings are all way too high. Im going to adjust my basal up a little bit too
Last edited by: coates_hbk: Nov 11, 13 4:43
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Re: The Official Diabetic Triathlete Thread [coates_hbk] [ In reply to ]
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coates_hbk wrote:
started at 9.6mmols right before the swim. Had 1 bolus unit in the background pretty much cleared out. 8 units of lantus on board. Swam and felt ok, ran to transition with legs like lead. I knew something wasnt right. I could hardly run. Checked my bsugar and after a 30 odd minute swim i was at 6.5mmols. So the numbers were reading ok, but i really had no power on the bike. I just had no energy and was zapped. I had 1 jellybean and that took my bsugar from 6.5mmols to 11. Crazy from a single jelly bean. I was thirsty as hell too. Signs pointed to ketoacidosis, however my numbers werent off the charts high. I dont know, i dont get it. I was well rested, tapered (didnt up my lantus dose during taper when i probably could have by 1 or 2 units) and raring to go. The swim itself was fine. My legs were just shot. I hopped off the bike in T2 to see if i could run and i had really bad quad cramps. I ambled for a km. It took me over 6 minutes. It was a familiar feeling. Cramping because i couldnt get glucose into my muscles. I didnt have enough insulin on board it felt like. I was really nauses on the bike aswell. As mentioned before, i have raced a half on 10 units of lantus and nothing else and blitzed it. No go this time. Such a shit disease where you analyze everything when it goes wrong and still leaves you guessing

Forgive me, but do you know what that converts to in the US? I have no idea what that means



"Keep those feet moving!" Me
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