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Strength Training/Core Work
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Any one incorporating strength training into IM training?

I have hit 47 and neglected this area of the body and paying
for it with too many soft tissue injuires

Time to reset he body and incorporate this if looking to continue
in the sport for next decade

Any one seen the real benefits from this and have links to exercises that can be done at home
and not at a gym and get same results?
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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I can't speak to IM training (road/tt guy), but at 49 I've begun focusing on this a little more over the last few years. During the off season, I hit the gym. Nothing extensive, just about an hour. I cycle through intensities over the offseason. For lower body, first block is adaptation (higher reps/lighter weight), second block is heavy/strength (4-6 rep range) and third block is in between but a little faster movement with a moderate weight. I do movements like squats, hip thrusts, kettlebell swings, lunges, single leg deadlifts and step ups. Upper body is just some simple middle of the road rep ranges with a medium/light weight with one to two exercises for chest, back and shoulders. Arms get enough work in the other exercises, so I don't do anything specific.

During the season, I switch over to maintenance at home. This means just 15 -20 min circuit once per week for each upper and lower body. For these workouts, I mainly use TRX and body weight exercises. TRX has some good 15 min workouts. But you can mix and match.

For core, I flip between the yoga/core work in the sufferfest app (I've never actually done a SF bike workout...) and workouts from Tom Danielson's "Core Advantage" book. The book has a multitude of progressive core workouts that focuses on different outcomes (rehab, posture, endurance, ultimate (everything mixed in)). Well worth the money in my opinion.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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A breakthrough for me in understanding core strength came from a physio/chiropractor. He said that core strength isn't sit ups, etc. It's the tensile strength of the entire torso.

Breathing is an important part of core strength. Aerobic training is an important part of creating a strong core. You'll be working on a strong core just by carrying yourself the right way while running, cycling and swimming.

So don't think you are not creating a strong core while swimming, cycling and running - you are.

Indoor Triathlete - I thought I was right, until I realized I was wrong.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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This is pretty good as a starting point: https://www.outsideonline.com/...sts-strength-workout
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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I'm 10 years ahead of you and find doing targeted work on mobility and some strength work a few times a week is more valuable that more time doing aerobic training.

I go see a PT from time to time and get some exercises and a better understanding of where I am weak or tight. It also helps me understand what is holding me back and the degree to which I can make changes in my mobility or if I just need to accept limitations.

I ran some quarters today ad my knee hurt. I was able to understand that the pain was related to a big toe that no longer bends and a tight hip and a weak glute. I can make progress on the glute a lot, the hip a little and the toe not at all. But I won't run much faster until I fix it, and just piling on miles will only make it worse, no matter what Runner's World says.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [ntnyln] [ In reply to ]
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ntnyln wrote:
For core, I flip between the yoga/core work in the sufferfest app (I've never actually done a SF bike workout...)...

Hi there guys. David (Founder) from The Sufferfest here. So glad you've found the yoga in our app to be useful. You might find our strength training programme, however, to be even more useful. Our sports scientists (led by coaching legend Neal Henderson) developed this programme to help cyclists and triathletes avoid the most common mistakes (Top 5 mistakes here: https://vimeo.com/298097322) that endurance athletes make when bringing strength work into their training regime. Our training plans are even designed to allow you to add strength training so you get maximum gains in a sustainable way and can do it year-round (a common mistake is only doing strength work in the off-season). You can find out more about the programme here: https://thesufferfest.com/...raining-for-cyclists

Happy to answer any questions about the programme if you have them.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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42 here and strength work is ESSENTIAL! So many of my fellow athletes dropping like flies from injuries of years of hard racing and no supporting work.
Just swim bike run til the wheels fall off sucks.

AND, strength work isn't all about pushing weights in the gym in the traditional sense.

https://drive.google.com/...SUE/view?usp=sharing

Ryan
http://www.SetThePaceTriathlon.com
http://www.TriathlonTrainingDaddy.com
Sample 70.3/140.6 Training Plans
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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I've been really happy with the results from the Running Rewired book from Jay Dicharry. It's got 8 gym workouts and 7 prep workouts that seem to be translating well. Something to look into - I've been extremely pleased with adding strength into my training so far.

DFRU - Detta Family Racing Unit...the kids like it and we all get out and after it...gotta keep the fam involved!
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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before hitting the weights, why don't you try and incorporate body weight exercises? I bet you will be surprised how neglected most of your muscles are just from that. Throw in some lunges, squats, push ups, BURPEES, mountain climbers, dips using chairs to prop your body up, simple jumping or box jumps onto a stable platform of any kind, crab walk like you used to do as a kid across the floor, sits ups/crunches.

Shit will leave you wrecked.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [AlyraD] [ In reply to ]
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There is a line in the fitness industry.

"Anyone can get you wrecked. But a good coach/program gets you moving well and stronger."

I agree with most of what you suggest, done properly. I would only take out burpees as many just end up with bummed shoulders from the excessive force placed on them with poor form. My only real addition would be lots of back strength and rows, we are already has humans for anteriorly dominated but neglect our backside. Most people would be out of back and shoulder pain just by having stronger back/shoulders.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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I am 46. Incorporated strength and MOBILITY into my plan during the winter before last with great results. 2-3 hrs a week by dropping tri training to 1-2 sessions of s-b-r. This was a mixture of mostly body weight circuit training (so some anaerobic work in there) and 1 session of progressive overload of core deadlifts, squats and step ups. Throughout the week, I have also introduced mobility (5-10 mins each morning and evening) as realised it is essential for keeping injury free and getting a great position on the bike. See below for example.



This year by training with some cross-fit guys, realised my hip flexors and glutes lack strength and have actually been weakened by years of tri and no strength and mobility work.

This year I have carried on strength training and will do so throughout the year.

2 sessions x 1hr per week. One with mobility / core - think lateral strength (side lunges, monster walks), multi-joint and whole body (lunge with twist, woodchoppers), and mobility maintenance (snow devils, single leg squat with glute strength) followed by progressive overload of deadlifts and squats. I do this on a Monday so as not to interfere with my long bike and run and then do swim and very easy run on Tuesday.

The second session each week on a Friday is mobility / core again for first 30 mins followed by upper body Calisthenics. Why the Calisthenics? For me it is purely fun ; ) I am learning new skills like pull ups, using Olympic Rings, handstands etc. Turns out it is also helping my swim and strengthen my lower back. And it can all be done at home. And it does not make me tired for my Saturday long bike and Sunday long run. Check out ‘School of Calisthenics’ via Insta / YouTube etc. Stacks of free content and you can sign up for 7 days free of charge to paid content and cancel if you are not interested.

Overall definitely more important than an extra 1hr run and 1hr bike each week in terms of gaining speed. And it is enjoyable. And your body gets stronger. Simple. Consider investing in a PT to fast-track you.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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Yes I do. Partially because I come from a different background. Try to train 3 days a week in the early part of the program and then phase down to two and then one day a week.

Focus on Power lifts in the big 3 or supplementary lifts of those. Once you've built up some experience, coaching in Olympic lifting would help a little if you really go deep so your form is good.

AlyraD said do some body weight stuff. I agree you need to onramp yourself with bodyweight exercises.

Rugby Media Dude-earfulofdirt.com

Hooker training for the Sport of Scrum-Halves [Triathlon]
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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RobertK wrote:
Any one incorporating strength training into IM training?

I have hit 47 and neglected this area of the body and paying
for it with too many soft tissue injuires

Time to reset he body and incorporate this if looking to continue
in the sport for next decade

Any one seen the real benefits from this and have links to exercises that can be done at home
and not at a gym and get same results?


I'm close to the same age as you and have also been dealing with a lot of soft tissue injuries recently. All along, I thought "with all of this biking and running, my legs and core are getting a great workout" but I was wrong. My PT was amazed at how weak some of my muscles were, especially my glutes (med and min).

To gain strength (and maintain rehab), I do a large majority of my workouts at home, and they usually only involve a floor mat and one of those rubber workout bands (I cannot recall the name). I do:

Planks
Bridges with feet on ground
Single leg bridges
Bridges with feet propped up on railing of bed
Squats (just using my own body weight)
Isometric wall squats (standing in place with back braced against wall)
Side walking with band around feet
Clam shells with band around knees (just above kneecap, end of lower leg)
Side leg raises with band around ankle


It's amazing how much strength these at home workouts have added. My PT could tell a huge difference when he retested me
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [eye3md] [ In reply to ]
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Hi eye3md

Thanks for feedback to all

What are the bridges that you are doing

Agree the elastic band I am now using for glute work
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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RobertK wrote:
Hi eye3md

Thanks for feedback to all

What are the bridges that you are doing

Agree the elastic band I am now using for glute work

For the bridges, I just lay on the mat, with knees bent and feet on floor, and thrust hip toward ceiling until I can feel it in my butt muscles. I hold for a count of three and then back down. Usually do 20 at a time.

Or, I'll do 15 reps with both feet on ground and then 5reps each of single leg reps (just holding opposite leg up in air).

The bridges have helped my glutes but also made my climbing (on the bike) better. I have so much less low back pain
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [eye3md] [ In reply to ]
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In the off season I use a powerlifting routine based around squat, deadlift, bench, and overhead press. As my training volume increases during the training season I find that the powerlifting is too much and I can't recover properly.
This year I've backed off the powerlifting and incorporated unilateral bodyweight exercises - single leg romanian deadlifts, single leg squat, rear lunges. On top of that I am doing core strengthening - planks, side planks, single leg bridges.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [TIT] [ In reply to ]
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I've found breathing exercises really effective too.

Hold a good posture, and take 10 strong breaths restricting expansion to the lower part of your diaphragm (almost only your belly moves)

Then the same with the middle (feels like your ribs expand out sideways)

Then with the top of the diaphragm - a typical deep lifting breath.

Repeat a few times per day.

Also practice engaging your core actively and holding posture as if you are stopping yourself going for a wee.
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [TIT] [ In reply to ]
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TIT wrote:
In the off season I use a powerlifting routine based around squat, deadlift, bench, and overhead press. As my training volume increases during the training season I find that the powerlifting is too much and I can't recover properly.
This year I've backed off the powerlifting and incorporated unilateral bodyweight exercises - single leg romanian deadlifts, single leg squat, rear lunges. On top of that I am doing core strengthening - planks, side planks, single leg bridges.


I also do a lot of the unilateral stuff like you do but it took me a while to build up to it. The first time I ever tried to do a single leg squat, I felt like my knee was going to crack. I just didnt have the strength to do single sided yet. Same with the single leg deadlifts. Wow, I could barely hold my balance to do just a few of them, even without weights. Its a nice feeling to build up to the point where single leg exercises become your norm and you are progressing
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [eye3md] [ In reply to ]
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Another vote for TRX, or another brand of suspension bands. Stability, strength and mobility all benefit.

Dr Jay
http://www.Tri-Pod.net
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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I am in the exact same boat
41 years of swimming and last Sept my shoulder gave out. Went to a PT they said that all I need to do is to start strength training. Cut all swimming out from Sept18 to Mar19 5 days a week of ST and PT.

Started swimming again late March (currently my CSS is 9s faster per 100m than my best effort last 2 years)
My ROM is now what it was at 30ish.



PT 3 to 5/week (10 to 45 mins depending on schedule)
ST 2/week 1.5 hr each

PT 1
Door way stretch
- wall wrist foam roller
- wall angles with foam roller
- band hand cuffs
- body blade external\internal rotation
- body blade Flexion
- band no moneys
- high plank unstable left\right
- Swimmer prone 1
- Swimmer prone 2
- Swimmer prone 3
- Foam roller pec stretch


Strength Training 1
- Suspension Trainer jump squat
- Cable Row with rotation
- Stability Ball Pike
- Wall Slide
- Rainbow Medicine Ball Slam
- Split Stance Landmine Press
- Sled Reverse Fly
- Stability Ball Iron Cross
- Pull ups
- Kinetic Training Bandbell

ST (the fun one)
- Battle Ropes
- Tire Flips
- Pull-ups
- Weighted Sled Push - 50 ft Rope Pull Back
- Sledgehammer
- Wall Ball
- Push-ups
- Cable Pushdown (tricepts)
- Russian Twist with weights
- Kinetic Training Bandbell
Last edited by: heliix: May 14, 19 10:15
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Re: Strength Training/Core Work [RobertK] [ In reply to ]
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I just turned 47 myself. Strength training has been a huge benefit for me, mainly for running and swimming. I used to get a little knee tenderness after running, particularly anything over an hour. Strength training pretty much has eliminated that except on really long runs. I can also tell my form is better and more efficient. The main lower body exercises I've been doing are squats, dead lifts, lunges, and single leg "step ups."

For swimming, strength training hasn't made my top end speed any faster, but I can sustain my pace for a lot longer.

I haven't noticed any specific benefit to biking, but I imagine it's helped that as well.
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