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Running shoe recommendation
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Have adidas supernova shoes now. Recently got a pair of on cloudflow. These shoes are super light and comfty just not sure I can do longer distance in them. I have had issues with PF and like cushioned shoes. I just ordered Hoka Clifton 4 and when they arrived, did not like the way they fell. Went to local store and tried on Nike air pegaus 34, liked those just not sure on cushioning. Really like the saucony Freedom ISO. Anyone have any feedback on the saucony Freedom ISO or Nike or something else I should look at. I fall into the neutral category for running shoes, have high arch and wide foot
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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I have the CloudSurfers and would have no problem running marathon distance in them. BY FAR the most comfy shoe I have ever worn..although they are a bit heavy.

Past shoes. Nike, New Balance, Brooks, Adidas, and my racing flat for 5k is the Merrell.

On's just fit me and the cushion is plenty for my busted up joints.
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [LuchaLibre] [ In reply to ]
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Altra Escalante...I'm in love
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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dl1340 wrote:
I fall into the neutral category for running shoes, have high arch and wide foot

Stop it... I'll get grilled for this but that doesn't mean you're neutral. I have the same characteristics and CANNOT run in neutral shoes long term. I'll get injured. I've proven this time after time. Switched to a mix of both neutral and support shoes.. boom. Best and most consistent running in years.
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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I loved the Cloudflow, but when I ramped up my mileage (15 mile long runs), I developed a serious shin splint - never had them before. I switched over to the Brooks Glycerin and the Hoka Clayton 2. The Brooks is heavier, but feels good and allows me to run. The Clayton 2 is lighter and I hope to slowly switch over to it. Miss the great feel of the Cloudflow, but not good for me for long runs or high mileage weeks.
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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dl1340 wrote:
Have adidas supernova shoes now. Recently got a pair of on cloudflow. These shoes are super light and comfty just not sure I can do longer distance in them. I have had issues with PF and like cushioned shoes. I just ordered Hoka Clifton 4 and when they arrived, did not like the way they fell. Went to local store and tried on Nike air pegaus 34, liked those just not sure on cushioning. Really like the saucony Freedom ISO. Anyone have any feedback on the saucony Freedom ISO or Nike or something else I should look at. I fall into the neutral category for running shoes, have high arch and wide foot

I have the hyperspeeds for races, great to run, but do get a little sore. So I train in the Clifton 3s which are great, I think they are lighter than the 4s? I also have the Pegasus, but rarely use those for long runs as I tend to need the extra cushioning the Hokas provide. Maybe look at other Hoka models? Not all Hokas are created equal!
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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Definitely agree that higher arches do not always guarantee a certain running gait, although MOST of the time arch heights behave in a certain way. What I mean is that 51+% of the time you see a higher arched person fall into that neutral category, meaning they have less flex and tend to be on the rigid side of things. But again that's not always the case. And of course as the distances go longer there is a potential for breakdown in form and biomechanics.

The Saucony Freedom ISO in my opinion lacks any sort of structure (in a bad way), I have seen the most neutral runners over-pronate and I struggled to run anything over a couple miles in the shoes myself.

Saucony has a new version of that shoe that will be coming out shortly that offers the slightest bit of stability posting on the medial side and I think it will be a more successful shoe. Still a full EverRun midsole of course but with some added posting.

The Triumph ISO 4 also debuts this month and has full EverRun so the feel is somewhat similar to the Freedom while still being a little more shoe.

Hoka will be replacing the Clayton 2 with the Mach come January, so that's a good one to look forward too. The Cavu is another one from them you could also investiagte.
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [tmwst19] [ In reply to ]
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On has some new shoes...Cloud X..might be worth a look
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [LuchaLibre] [ In reply to ]
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Anyone try the Cloud X yet?
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [EnderWiggan] [ In reply to ]
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[quoteAltra Escalante...I'm in love ][/quote]



Worst advice I've read on ST today and that's saying something.

The Altra are zero drop the very opposite of what the OP needs with PF. The OP also said they like cushioned shoes.

FFS people read, think, then reply

Brian Stover
Accelerate3 Coaching
Insta Twitter
We'll be doing a bike fit/wind tunnel session at some point. PM for dets
Last edited by: desert dude: Dec 4, 17 10:31
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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Assuming you really do need neutral shoes if you liked the Pegasus you may like the Vomero even more. Both are neutral the Vomero is more cushioned.
The freedom probably isn't as cushioned nor does it have the same amount of drop as the Supernova. It's more cushioned then the Kinvara though. Both use a TPU midsole.

With PF you want to elevate the heel to take strain off the PF which means no 0 drops, no 4,5 and I'd start higher than 6mm then if I didn't find the shoe I'd work down that direction. The Freedom ISO is 4mm the Clifton is 5mm.

I'd encourage you to start with shoes at a minimal 8mm drop and compare those to 9,10, 12mm drop shoes. IIRC the Supernova's are 10mm.

Asics Gel Pursue, Cumulus Nimbus IIRC all are 10mm

361 Running Spinject (8mm), Meraki (9mm) Spire 2 (11mm)

Adidas - Supernova

Saucony Ride, triumph ISO both 8mm

Nike Pegasus or Vomero -10mm

Mizuno Wave Sky or Wave rider both 10mm

that should get you started on some shoes that may work

Brian Stover
Accelerate3 Coaching
Insta Twitter
We'll be doing a bike fit/wind tunnel session at some point. PM for dets
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [desert dude] [ In reply to ]
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Local shoe store allowed me to switch out the On cloudflow for a new shoe. I ended up getting the new balance 1080 fresh foam v7. Put about 25 miles on them so far. So we will see how they do
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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I used to run in Hokas but switched last year. Right now I'm running in Nike Air Pegasus 34 and I really like them. I was hesitant to buy them because I'm not a Nike fan, but they're great good shoes. I'm definitely going to buy another pair. I'm also running in Adidas Boston for tempo runs and races. Those are great shoes too, but more lightweight and probably not the cushioning you're looking for.

I think what I like so much about the Nike Air Pegasus is that they're just good, basic, well-built running shoes. No gimmicks. I wasn't amazed by them when I first put them on because they just felt like normal running shoes. The more I run in them, the more I like them. I liked the feel of Hokas when I first tried them on, but I was never impressed with their quality (especially for the price).

The Pegasus may not have as much cushioning as you're after, but they are good shoes if you decide to go that route.
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Re: Running shoe recommendation [dl1340] [ In reply to ]
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Not directly expressed at the OP, but for all those who have chimed in above - keep in mind that feeling a little beat up after longer harder run efforts is normal, and shouldn't be totally avoided. It's NOT necessarily a good thing that you can change up your sneakers for more cushion, more support, then suddenly bang out long runs far in excess of your priors (like ramping from 7 milers to 15 milers) even if the shoes 'allow' you to do it.

In fact, it's eminently arguable that it's actually better for your shoes (or lack thereof) to NOT totally shield you from the required forces of running (particularly ground impact and achilles loading) so you are intrinsically limited to slower buildups. Yes, it requires more patience, but running is an impact sport and should be treated as such.

You do NOT want shoes that allow you to 'defy' the gradual buildup recommendations that have been proven with time and practice across all sorts of runners of all backgrounds. Even if you were a high-mileage guy before, but now only running <20mpw, it is seriously not a good idea to decide you can put on cushiony shoes and bang out 15-20 milers in a single pop just because you can.
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