Login required to started new threads

Login required to post replies

Prev Next
Run Training - The Program (part 2)
Quote | Reply
A continuation of Run Training - The Program (part 1)

http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...;;page=unread#unread


A Quick Summary of Part 1

Phase 1 – all easy paced training using the paces @ www.mcmillanrunning.com. Run 6 days a week using a 1:2:3 ration (ie short runs of 15 minutes, medium runs of 30 minutes, and a long run of 45 minutes....just as an example). Gradually increase mileage, but by no more than 10% from one week to the next.

Phase 2 – replace one medium run a week with a threshold workout of 20-60 minutes long.

Phase 3 – replace the other medium run with a race specific workout.

Some people will never reach phases 2 or 3.

Working Toward a Goal Race

Every now and then I’ll get someone to ask me how to train for a sprint triathlon in 2 months and then get ready for a half marathon 6 weeks after that. My answer is I don’t know. My training strategy is geared toward an end of the season A race. Everything else in the plan is secondary to that. You can either train for the sprint tri and run the best half marathon you can 6 weeks after your peak, or you can train for the half marathon and run the best tri split you can in the middle of phase 3 of your half marathon training.

Nevertheless, your goal race will largely determine what kind of workouts you do in phase 3 of your training plan. I will address each race distance below and do my best to account for different ability levels and how one should adjust their training.

Training Balance

I started an entire thread on this here:

http://forum.slowtwitch.com/gforum.cgi?post=1600721;search_string=runtraining11;#1600721

Too many athletes compartmentalize training into an either-or approach. Do you need speed, or do you need distance? You need both. The question is how much of each do you need, and that largely depends on your level of fitness as well as the race distance you plan to run. See the chart below for a graphical explanaition:




Allow me to briefly explain this chart. To put it simply, the shorter your race is, the more speed and less endurance training you are going to need. The longer your race is, the more endurance and the less speed training you are going to need. Somewhere in between the two extremes you will also need a mixture of threshold (those 20 to 60 minute sustained hard runs) and V02max training (efforts at 3K to 5K race pace).

What mixture would that be? It all depends on how long it is going to take you to finish a race. The actual length of the race is not necessarily that important, nor is how long it will take you to finish it. It’s really about what energy systems your body will be utilizing while racing, which can be predicted by the two previous variables.

I have circled above an athlete who runs about 33 miles a week and is in phase 3 of his training. His goal race is a stand alone 5k, which will take him about 20 minutes to complete. Looking at the chart above you can see that he will want about an even mix of threshold and V02max training, and a good portion of speed work (efforts at 1k to 2K race pace), while still maintaining a large amount of easy running to build the aerobic system (reminder: all of this training develops the aerobic system. The easy training targets it best because you can do lots and lots of it). What’s most important to understand here is that if this athlete was, instead, training for a half marathon, he needs more threshold training and more easy running while requiring less V02max and speed training (look just to the left of the 60 minute mark). If he is training for an Ironman, he will mostly need lots and lots of easy running (speed work to run 10 minute miles? Nah.)

Standalone Training versus Tri-Training

The above chart is meant for standalone races. I use a really simple conversion to compare stand alone training to tri-training. The run segment of a triathlon is equivalent to double that distance as a stand alone race. In other words, in order to be properly trained to run the 5K segment of a sprint triathlon, you should train to be in 10K stand alone racing shape. For a Half Ironman, you want to be in marathon shape.

This has little to do with being able to run twice as far and more to do with training the proper energy systems. Triathlons are simply run slower than standalone races, so using the chart above, everything slides to the left. The 5k segment of a sprint tri is going to require just a little less speed and a less trained V02max than a stand alone 5K, while relying more on your aerobic conditioning.

Interval Training

Below you will see recommendations for two types of interval training: V02max intervals and threshold/V02max borderline intervals.

I typically recommend that V02max intervals be done starting at around 5K race pace and done for a distance that takes 3 to 3 ½ minutes to cover. For most people this will be 800m. I like the recoveries to be 2 to 2 ½ minutes, or 300-400m. Begin at 5K race pace on the first interval and gradually work your way down to 5-10 sec faster than that pace per interval (or 10-20 sec/mile faster). Be very careful to stay under control. The intent is not to kill yourself during these interval sessions. As a general rule, if you can’t go immediately into a jog after your interval, you are working too hard. Some good coaches disagree with me on this point, but I find that the potential reward of training any harder does not outweigh the risk of over training if the intervals are run to the point of exhaustion. Always remember, if you leave the track a bit undertrained, you can always just run more mileage the next day.

The threshold/V02max borderline intervals are run at 45 minute race pace and are typically done at a ratio of 100m jogging for every 500m running. I prefer 1500m intervals with 300m jogs. You will find this workout to be a bit less stressful than the above intervals and the jog breaks will be rather short.

Speed Training

What I call speed training is what Jack Daniels refers to as Repetition training. He typically recommends them as 200-400m intervals, while Pfitzinger and Galloway (from his first book) recommend them in 100m chunks. Either way, I like to do these with easy jogs of equal lengths in between each one. The pace should be pretty close to mile race pace, which is a pace that is pretty quick yet not really close to all out sprinting. I don’t really recommend much of this for longer race distances as its benefits become less and less important for the longer distances. Striders (explained later) are used in place of speed for these distances.

Threshold/Tempo Runs

From part 1:

Jack Daniels has a nice chart on page 114 of his 2nd edition Running Formula to cover the different paces one should run for different durations. Greg McMillan also covers these paces in his pace calculator.

The chart in Daniels’ Formula is pretty self explanatory. Regarding McMillan’s site, use the tempo run pace to describe sustained 20 minute runs, and the steady state pace to describe threshold runs from 40 minutes (lower range) and to 60 minutes (upper range).

Once you have moved out of the base phase, I recommend throwing in a single threshold workout each week in place of a medium run. I recommend a mix of the lengths described above (20 to 60 minutes) at the corresponding paces. However, the entire workout, including warmup and cool down, should be at least a mile or two shorter than your medium run. For many of you, this will limit you to shorter workouts (20 minute range). I also recommend giving yourself at least 2 weeks to adjust to this workout, starting off with half the distance the first week, and then ¾ distance the next. Overall weekly mileage should not be increased at this time as the added intensity will lead to an increased training load. In fact, a *reduction* in mileage may be necessary and should be considered the day or two after this workout is introduced.

Cruise (threshold) Intervals

Some people prefer to do threshold training as intervals. The nice thing about cruise intervals is that you can do about 50% more work than you can with a tempo run. There is a compromise between the two workouts. Cruise intervals allow you to do more work, while tempo runs allow you to mimic race conditions. I recommend a mix of both. The rest should be kept very short for cruise intervals. A ration of 5:1 is appropriate (5min working, 1min jog, or 10min working, 2min jog, etc.)

Tips about Steady State Runs

60 minutes on a track? Are you kidding me?! I prefer to do these near a track and then map out a course that I can run off of the track to try and break up the monotony. I’ll run my first mile on the track to dial in the pace, and then 1-2 miles off of the track at that same effort, and then another 1-2 laps on the track to make sure the pace is still good, and then back out onto the course. Rinse and repeat for 60 minutes.

The Training Continuum

In the above chart I talked about endurance, threshold, V02max, and speed training as if they are four completely separate concepts. There is no magic black line that compartmentalizes one training zone as being completely different from another one. It's presented this way as a means to be able to talk about different types of training and how and why it is done, but if the chart above was to be drawn more accurately, it would be more of an overlapped mishmashing of the different colors. Training at mile race pace will improve all of the energy systems that affect your body’s ability to run an ultra marathon just like easy running will improve your mile time, when compared to doing nothing at all. Running just a little less a little faster or a little more a little slower will have very similar effects.

And that last sentence I think is very valuable information to know. If you ever get into a workout and find that you have run it faster than you should have, simply cut the workout short and know with confidence that you had a good workout.

Weather Considerations

Heat and humidity slow you down. Remember this on workout day.

Ultra Long Runs

For longer races (mainly half and full marathons) it may not be possible for you to get in an adequate length long run following the advice laid out here (a long run of at least 80% of the race distance). In this case, I recommend an ultra long run every 2-3 weeks with a normal long run on the in between weeks. The ultra long run should increase by about 1-2 mile increments on the alternating weeks and build toward at least 80% of the race distance, or 3 hours, whichever is less. In the case of a half marathon, if possible, the ultra long run can be pushed up to 13-15 miles.

An example of a long run progression for a 4:8:12 athlete might be as follows: 12 miles one week, 13 the next, 12 the week after that, 14-15 following that week, back to 12, etc. Back out of the goal race week enough weeks using this progression to see at what point you’ll need to begin your ultra long runs.

Warning about ultra long runs – During the course of an ultra long run there often comes a point where the body starts to feel pretty bad. I never recommend running for more than 10 minutes beyond this point as it will dramatically affect the rest of your week’s training. This may prevent you from reaching your eventual goal ultra long run, but you simply can’t force your body to be more fit than it is and your goal in training is to do the training that you are currently prepared for, not the training you want to be prepared for.

Striders

2 to 4 times a week finish your run with a set of three to six 50 meter striders. This is a short fast run (but not a sprint) where you concentrate on form to the best of your ability. The theory behind striders is that at higher speeds your body self corrects it form and teaches you to run more efficiently.

Races as Workouts

Always remember that on any week that you run a race that you should eliminate one of your workouts. For a 5K race (not a sprint-tri) I recommend eliminating the interval workout for that week (if one is scheduled). For anything longer, eliminate a threshold workout. For harder races, keep in mind that you may need several days or longer of recovery. The key concept to take away here is to make sure you don’t boost your training load as a result of not compensating for a race with the rest of your week’s training.

Tapering

Always include a taper before your goal race. Shorter races like a 5K need only 4-9 days for a taper. Longer races require more….2 to 3 weeks for a marathon and 3 to 5 weeks for an Ironman. Keep in mind in the following sections that whenever I refer to periods before the goal race, I am actually referring to the number of weeks before the beginning of the taper.

Coming soon: Part 3 - Putting it all together for differnt race distances

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Last edited by: BarryP: Oct 16, 09 11:21
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Way too important to fall off the front page that quickly

Mark
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Where do you place hill repeats in this program (if at all). If you are targetting hill(y) races, then I find they are important. At what point would you introduce them? Instead of intervals?




http://recipher.co.uk/
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Why are these being posted as posts here, instead of articles?

I really appreciate them, but think they'll have more staying power show
up better in searches as articles? Is this something Barry/Dan/Jordan could
work out?

-Jot
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [gamebofh] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Quote:
Why are these being posted as posts here, instead of articles?

I really appreciate them, but think they'll have more staying power show
up better in searches as articles? Is this something Barry/Dan/Jordan could
work out?

That's completely up to them. I would be more than flattered if that were the case, but I also understand that I'm somewhat of a nobody in the big picture. I'm just a guy who runs kinda, sorta well and coached a handful of high school teams kinda, sorta well. Maybe I have a talent for wrtiting the information in a way that makes sense....maybe not.

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Barry:

I took a couple of months to digest the collection of your run postings, and put a run plan in place for a couple of key races in 2010. I am four weeks into the base building, hopefully looking towards a PR in a 1/2 Marathon next May and a solid run for an IM next September.

We shall see....
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [recipher] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Quote:
Where do you place hill repeats in this program (if at all). If you are targetting hill(y) races, then I find they are important. At what point would you introduce them? Instead of intervals?

Damn! I knew I forgot something. I had this sitting around waiting for some final editing, and I wanted to touch on that. I'll simply quote Desert Dude here:

"Yes. Hills are good. Run them a lot."


Where to put in hill training might be one of my weaknesses. I think that some workouts should be done on hills, some long runs should be done on hills, and some medium runs should be done on hills. If your A race is hilly, then hills are even more important.


One thing I have attempted that worked out well is if you can find a really long hill, park about half way down it, warmup to the bottom of the hill, and then do your workout up it, and then cooldown back to your car. Intervals can be done this way as well, but do the jogs down hill. For a V02max interval workout, my coach (after I left college) would have the team do 3 minutes hard up the hill, and 2 minutes jogging back down. Repeat until you hit the top. If you hit the top early.....well, the rest of your workout will just be flat.

For any distance events longer than 2K, the hills don't have to be steep at all.

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Great stuff, Barry.

-----
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--
I took the one less traveled by,
Which is probably why I was registering 59.67mi as I rolled into T2.

Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
your goal in training is to do the training that you are currently prepared for, not the training you want to be prepared for.

Ahh, if only we could remember this day after day. To this I would add another note; your goal race pace should be determined using the training you have already done, not by decided the pace you wish you could run.

Chad
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
when do you move from phase I to phase II? When you are up to 45 minutes of easy running 6x per week?
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [mr. mike] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I cover that a bit in part 3. 1st off, you wouldn't be doing 45 minutes a day as I advocate doing short, medium, and long runs. So a 45 minute a day guys would actually be doing ~ 27, 54, and an 81 minute run (27, 54, 27, 54, 27, 0, 81).

There's an art to it and it all depends on your fitness level and the race you are training for. Most people training for an IM may never get out of phase 1.

If you can be a little patient, I cover this in part 3 next week.

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
 
awesome info barry..


http://www.3fkta.blogspot.com
"it takes commitment and clear understanding that being an endurance athlete is just hard. there are no short cuts."

Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
In regards to hills. I personally think way too many people do way too many hill repeats (ie run up a hill really fast turn around jog down and repeat), way too fast, way to often.

Something like that, depending upon the steepness of course, would best used to develop power (notice I didn't say strength :-)) and/or vo2/anaerobic capacity/neuromuscluar systems.

For people running over hilly races, the limiting factor isn't how many hills you've done or how hard you've run them. The limiting factor is how fit you are and secondarily how much of a beating are the downhills going to dish out to you. The fitter you are the easier the uphills will be and the less punishing the downhills will be.

I think the best thing for most people would be to incorporate rolling/hilly terrain into their everyday runs, tempo, threshold runs and long runs and skip specific hill repeat sessions unless they are shoring up a glaring weakness.

Brian Stover
Accelerate3 Coaching
Twitter
Insta
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [desert dude] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Re - hard, fast hill repeats. They seem to have a lot more value for 800m-1500m types, and 5K XC runners who might have to run some pretty steep hills.


Hills were a big deal during Lydiard's era and on into Galloway's book in '84 (who made it big during the Lydiard years). You haven't seen much emphasis on them as of late.

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
As you add miles to your plan do you add minutes across many workouts to keep your 1:2:3 ratio...or do you keep it say 5 minute chunks...

ie.

Week 1:
10, 20, 10, 20, 10, 0, 30 would become 10, 20, 15, 20, 10, 0, 35 adding 10%
Or
10, 20, 10, 20, 10, 0, 30 would become 11, 22, 11, 22, 11, 0, 39 adding 10% (plus one minute to keep the 1:2:3 ratio)

________________
Blogging
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [JReed] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Not entirely sure how Barry would do it, but I'd choose 2 runs to add some time to instead of adding time to all the runs. Hold for 2-4 weeks then repeat with 2 more runs.

Brian Stover
Accelerate3 Coaching
Twitter
Insta
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [desert dude] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Similar to fast finish long runs, I like to throw in hill finish workouts. Teaching tired legs how to suddenly change gears has helped my race performance tremendously over the last 2-3 seasons. I find that tackling a nice 10-15 minute steady grade at the end of a 120 minute run really emphasizes the importance of solid form and turnover.

"The right to party is a battle we have fought, but we'll surrender and go Amish... NOT!" -Wayne Campbell
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [JReed] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Early on I add minutes to my runs. Usually 2, 4, and 6 minutes each week. So it might look like this:


week 1 8, 16, 8, 16, 8, 0, 24
week 2 10, 20, 10, 20, 10, 0, 30
week 3 12, 24, 12, 24, 12, 0, 36


And then later on I start thinking in miles, and bump them up in terms of round miles. I do it mainly because it makes things easier for me as I have a couple of loops that I like to do. So it might look like this:


week 6 3, 6, 3, 6, 3, 0, 9 = 30
10% of 30 is 3 miles, so I'll add a mile to 3 of the runs

week 7 4, 6, 4, 6, 3, 0, 10

At this point the 4s stay 4s until the 6s work up to 8s.



Notice early on the I violate the 10% rule. Sometimes I do that, but usually as a result of deliberately under training to begin with.


DDs method works as well.

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Barry, thanks for sharing this great information.

I have a question about the taper section.

Isn't tapering more to ensure full recovery from the prior workload? Once you are fully recovered, your fitness begins to decline. Why would you need a longer taper for a longer race? My assumption has always been that an IM triathlete needs a longer taper because their IM training dug them in to a deeper hole prior to the race.
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [jyeager] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
To be honest, I don't have a great answer. I've spent most of my training and coaching in the 5K-20K range and have just pretty much found the sweet spot for tapering based off of experience, a bit of research, and advice from coaches and other runners. I just happen to know that they usually recommend a longer taper for the marathon, probably for similar reasons to an IM taper.

Perhaps Desert Dude or a resident SME (subject matter expert) would like to chime in?

-----------------------------Baron Von Speedypants
-----------------------------RunTraining articles here:
http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...runtraining;#1612485
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [jyeager] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
In Reply To:
Isn't tapering more to ensure full recovery from the prior workload? Once you are fully recovered, your fitness begins to decline. Why would you need a longer taper for a longer race? My assumption has always been that an IM triathlete needs a longer taper because their IM training dug them in to a deeper hole prior to the race.

I'm not Barry, though I'm sure he may have some follow up comment, but an athlete shouldn't NEED anything from a taper other than putting on the last 5% of finishing touches to your training. If an athlete is looking at the taper as "digging out of a hole" there are other issues to address before finding the ideal taper length since there shouldn't be a hole in the first place. One idea that has come up before regarding IM training was to take a taper-ish week about 3-4 weeks out from the race and then go into the race with relatively normal training hours in the weeks immediately preceding the race. That way you are guaranteed some freshening if have dug yourself a hole, but you can reestablish some consistency going into the race, which is itself important because plenty of people screw themselves up by tapering too much.

For marathons, my preference has been to keep the mileage relatively steady (with some obvious reduction since you won't pad your mileage with 20-22 milers in the last couple of weeks) but to decrease the intensity. Plenty of people like to cut mileage and raise the intensity, which is fine for shorter events from 800m-10k, but for the marathon (and I would presume IM too) doing too much intense work close to the race with reduced mileage ends up screwing with your metabolism. Athletes will spend months and month building themselves into highly efficient fat burning machines (ideal for the marathon) but then throw their metabolism way off with intense VO2 max type sessions in the last two weeks before the race and then crash and burn around mile 20-22. I'm sure you can find some examples of guys like Shorter who did taper with intense track work, but keep in mind he was also running 150mpw at times. Historically speaking, the idea of a huge taper to "dig yourself out of a hole" gained traction for good reason in the running boom of the 70s when guys were running ridiculously high mileage and flogging themselves into the ground and really did NEED to take three taper weeks to literally lick their wounds before the race. As a general matter you can have a more extreme taper on a higher mileage program simply because there is more to taper from (and by mileage, I don't just mean mileage in your most recent training plan; I'm also referring to lifetime mileage), but you shouldn't NEED the taper. A 55-60mpw runner who has been running for 4-5 years should not be tapering in the same manner as someone running 100mpw for a decade.
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [LarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Quote:
Athletes will spend months and month building themselves into highly efficient fat burning machines (ideal for the marathon) but then throw their metabolism way off with intense VO2 max type sessions in the last two weeks before the race and then crash and burn around mile 20-22


???????????????

Brian Stover
Accelerate3 Coaching
Twitter
Insta
Last edited by: desert dude: Aug 7, 15 10:42
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Barry, thank you for this. I have read over the years your thoughts on running and have always been intrigued. I actually did a search before joining the forum tonight on "benefits of running everyday" basically from the history of your writings. funny this post was on the front page.

What pace would you recommend someone starting phase 1 trying to build up running 6 days a week? I have been running for too long now, and what to change it up to shock the system. Goal will be to build to a half marathon or half ironman (still undecided) in spring/early summer. normally i would run outside or get on the treadmill, put it on 7.5 and maybe put in some speed intervals around 8.5 to 9.0 but as you can imagine not seeing any real improvements.

any advice you have is appreciated.

thanks again.
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [desert dude] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
In Reply To:
Athletes will spend months and month building themselves into highly efficient fat burning machines (ideal for the marathon) but then throw their metabolism way off with intense VO2 max type sessions in the last two weeks before the race and then crash and burn around mile 20-22
In Reply To:


???????????????
OK, that probably gives too much credit to most people in suggesting that they actually enter the marathon peaking phase as "efficient fat burning machines", but essentially you don't want to get 'too sharp' when preparing for the marathon, especially as the duration of the race increases beyond 3 hours. VO2 max sessions will have the corresponding effect of increasing the ratio of carbs burned in relation to fats. If you train your body to burn carbs at too high a ratio early in the marathon you'll run out of gas at the 20+ mile mark and then wonder "how many additional gels should I have carried?" and start "Critique my Marathon Nutrition Plan" threads when the problem was in the sequencing of the training. Obviously, if you don't do any sharpening work for the shorter events, you run the risk of never getting out of first gear, so vo2max work does have value as a peaking element for events around 15-20 minutes. For the marathon though, too much vo2max oriented work close to the race (especially if it is accompanied by an excessive decrease in mileage) will make the runner too sharp and set up potential disaster in the last 5k. Yes, Pfitzinger does have what he calls "vo2max" sessions of repeat 600s at 5k pace at the ends of his programs, but unless you are running your 5ks faster than the world record, 5k pace is quite different than vo2max pace for most of the target audience running close to 20 minutes. A relatively short distance (600m) at a less than all-out pace (5k pace) in manageable quantities (7-8 reps) is normally fine for tuning up without changing the body's metabolic calibration as it relates to demands of a 3+ hour race.
Last edited by: LarryP: Oct 17, 09 6:20
Quote Reply
Re: Run Training - The Program (part 2) [BarryP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
In Reply To:
V02max training (efforts at 3K to 5K race pace).

How is 5km or even 3km pace a VO2max training effort? 5km pace is nowhere near a VO2max effort. (3:55/km vs 3:15/km for me) and 3 1/2 minute intervals at 3:55 with 2 minute recoveries are an easy workout.

Could you define your use of the term "over training" here? Very overloaded term, and I think a suggestion that you can become overtrained simply by doing the odd interval session such that you have to take a short walk break at the end of each interval would lead to it isn't too normal.

On the general point, 20minute 5km is something any averagely fit male under 40 should comfortably be able to train to (how much training will purely depend on pre-start of exercise fitness - and particularly weight) and most should be able to get there with just about any sort of training rather than a carefully laid plan.
Quote Reply

Prev Next