Login required to started new threads

Login required to post replies

Prev Next
Overwhelmed Novice
Quote | Reply
I am coming from a pretty heavy distance running background, and I must admit, this whole multisport training thing seems very complicated. Not only do you have to learn two more sports, each of which is more complicated on there own in comparison to running, but you have to train how they interact with each other. So, I come with two questions.

1. How long did it take you to understand training for the sport? I mean like all the drills and novel types of workouts the other two sports need, and how all that interacts with periodization and so forth.

2. What helped you learn this process? I'm sure personal experience plays a part, but did you read books? Talk to coaches? Other athletes on seedy forums?

Overall, I'm having fun building a physical base, but my incredible lack of a knowledge base grows more and more frustration, and I'd very much like your advice.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
2 pieces of advice:
1) consistency is the single most important ingredient. The fancy sounding stuff is the icing.

2) pick a plan— one plan— and follow it. A plan solves the periodization, progression, and wko balance for you and lets you focus on consistency and execution
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Hang around on Slowtwitch. You have to sift through a lot of opinions but eventually you will pick up some valuable information. If there is a local triathlon club get with them to do bike rides and OWS swims.

"Aquabike is a swim then sleep session on aerobars ...."
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I started in 1984. It took me about five minutes to figure it out. Workout whenever you get a chance. Consistency is the key.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [jimatbeyond] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
jimatbeyond wrote:
I started in 1984. It took me about five minutes to figure it out. Workout whenever you get a chance. Consistency is the key.

..
..
Yep, I started in '86 and I am constantly amazed at how people these days just want to complicate the hell out of everything to do with the sport.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
What is periodization?
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [jimatbeyond] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
jimatbeyond wrote:
What is periodization?

If you're not trolling....Periodization is the systematic planning of athletic or physical training. The aim is to reach the best possible performance in the most important competition of the year. It involves progressive cycling of various aspects of a training program during a specific period.
Its great you were able to figure it out in 5 minutes but it sounds like the OP wants to do more than exercise
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
First off, welcome! it is a complicated sport. I think we’re all always learning how to optimally train for and play this game, and that is part of the appeal.

I found Joe Friel’s Triathlete Training Bible to be a good foundational read. https://www.amazon.com/...ensive/dp/1937715442
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Swim often. 6 - 20 minute swims per week are letter than 2 - 1 hour swims.

Bike hard and bike a lot.

You already know how to run.

Prepare to spend a small fortune.

That's about it.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Welcome to the club. I'm a novice who started down the path in December last year. I'm hoping my first tri (70.3) will be in Nov (previous 2 were cancelled).

Training was difficult to figure out. I wanted (and still do want) to learn as much about training as possible. I know if you spend 15 hours a week you'll be ready... I only have 8. So I asked myself a million times what I was supposed to do for those 8 hours and I read tons of articles/watched hours of youtube to learn more.

Each time I'd learn something new I'd panic and throw my training schedule off trying to fit in a new session or two.

You sound like you have some sport training background (like following a running plan). You've may have experienced what I'm talking about. There are hundreds (thousands?) of coaches out there and each one does things a little differently. That means each plan is a little different; each article you read is a little different; each YouTube you watch is a little different.

If you don't have a race planned before March, my advice is to spend the next two weeks researching the multitude of plans (if you want/need a coach, then research those) and the select one based on the time and geography you have available. If you're like me and only have 8-10 hours a week, what good is a plan than schedules 12-13? if your a flatlander, such as myself, what good is a plan that calls for hill sprints every week?

Once you select the plan/coach just go with it. Try not to continue to look at different plans. You can continue to read and watch, just don't change it.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Day in, Day out consistency is king. If you do anything today that prevents you from training tomorrow, you are doing it wrong.

I could never get past that on my own, so I hired a coach. Best decision I made in my post-Collegiate, adult athlete life.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Go do a couple local cheap sprint races to get a feel for how race day goes down. Use those lessons learned to make a path forward.

The only absolute is that you need to be able to finish the swim safely.

Formerly MTBSully
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Ice789] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Ice789 wrote:
First off, welcome! it is a complicated sport. I think we’re all always learning how to optimally train for and play this game, and that is part of the appeal.

I found Joe Friel’s Triathlete Training Bible to be a good foundational read. https://www.amazon.com/...ensive/dp/1937715442

There's a thread on that book right now. I wouldn't recommend it for someone who already feels overwhealmed.

https://forum.slowtwitch.com/.../?page=unread#unread
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
As you plan your training be prepared to be flexible depending on what else is going on in your life because tri training has a lot of moving parts. Nearby lighting cancels a swim workout, sick kids at home, work deadlines, or that 3rd DIPA which seemed like a good idea at the time last night.

I find a week rarely goes as planned so roll with it as best you can and don’t stack trainings to make it up. That was a hard lesson learned for me.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Driva77 wrote:
I am coming from a pretty heavy distance running background, and I must admit, this whole multisport training thing seems very complicated. Not only do you have to learn two more sports, each of which is more complicated on there own in comparison to running, but you have to train how they interact with each other. So, I come with two questions.

1. How long did it take you to understand training for the sport? I mean like all the drills and novel types of workouts the other two sports need, and how all that interacts with periodization and so forth.

2. What helped you learn this process? I'm sure personal experience plays a part, but did you read books? Talk to coaches? Other athletes on seedy forums?

Overall, I'm having fun building a physical base, but my incredible lack of a knowledge base grows more and more frustration, and I'd very much like your advice.

1. Its a never ending learning process---often just about yourself. But, if you have a good handle on distance running workouts you should be able to relate those to the bike pretty easily. If you are doing "bike (or run) drills" you're doing it wrong. Drills only have a place in the pool...even that is questionable without on-deck coaching---as doing a drill wrong is worse than not doing a drill.

2. I starting tri-ing back in early 2002. I hung out in seedy forums (gordoworld, trainingbible.com, cruciblefitness, etc) talking to highly mentally suspect individuals, and coaches. I traded professional services with a couple coaches back then, to get some 1-on-1 coaching. I've only read one book on Triathlon, and don't recommend it (see above).

Triathlon doesn't have to be complicated. But, you can make it as complex as you like. That's a personal choice that has little impact on results. Some people like having a library of 40 workouts to choose from (per sport) and doing something different every day and week. Other's just get out the door. Neither approach is "better" than the other, because as others have noted....90% of it is just showing up every day---usually twice, sometimes thrice.

Daily workout scheduling is probably the hardest part. I learned a lot about daily scheduling from those two coaches I worked with early on. You've only got so much "recovery" to invest into intense training. So, spend it wisely. You will have to learn how intensity in each sport impacts your ability to perform in downstream workouts in the other sports...either on the same day or within the next 48 hours. They may not be the same thing. You will find that the order of sports matters.

I can get away with stacking intensity between two sports on the same day. Hard Swim (morning), Hard run/bike (lunch or dinner)...or run (lunch), bike (dinner). But, my swimming is badly impacted by hard running the day before, but not bike. I need to be physically and mentally fresh to swim well (er...as well as I can...which is not). My legs need to be fresh-ish to do a hard run. But, I can get away with some fatigue for a SST bike. You may be the same or you may be different---our different backgrounds have some impact here. So, I prioritize freshness requirements as Swim -> Run -> Bike.

I try to space things out that either have downstream effects or upstream requirements by 36-48 hours. EG: If I need to be fresh to swim (upstream req) on Wed, then I know I can't do a hard-run (downstream effect) on Tuesday--it will need to be easy or short (or both). And my hard run will need to be on Monday....or, Wednesday after the swim.

Periodization has its place, but its different from what you might do for single-sport racing...and, changes (to a degree) with race distance. I would say that's more of an advanced topic, and not really relevant for a first-year triathlete. Certainly, its not nearly as important as figuring out a weekly routine that works, and just getting out the door every day.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Fuller] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Fuller wrote:
Hang around on Slowtwitch. You have to sift through a lot of opinions but eventually you will pick up some valuable information. If there is a local triathlon club get with them to do bike rides and OWS swims.

I've learned a ton over the years of being on ST. You'll realize there are a handful of posters who actually know what they're talking about. The only one that comes to mind right now is desert dude.

Instagram | floathammerholdon | BSC Multisport

Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Dolfan] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Dolfan wrote:
I find a week rarely goes as planned so roll with it as best you can and don’t stack trainings to make it up. That was a hard lesson learned for me.

That's a super good point, worth repeating. There is no such thing as a makeup workout. If you miss what's on the schedule, then you need to prioritize what's important at the next training window---the next workout, or the missed workout. If you decide the missed workout is the more important one...then, you have to review the downstream schedule to make sure you don't have to rejuggle everything else. Usually its easier to just "let it go", and stick with the original plan.

The effects of a poorly executed rejuggling can extend for a week or more, before it all comes crashing down. A little extra fatigue here, a little less recovery there....just never quite getting back on top of it...and slowly grinding into the ground 10 days later, when you find you need to take three days off the get out of the hole.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [D.O.] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
It was a joke.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Although this may not be the best year for this sport, I always used a very simple method to determine training.

Train for your first race anyway you like.................then race.

After the race you look at the times for each of the 4 disciplines (T1 & T2 are a discipline)
The ones you suck at, focus on those in training until you.................

Race again

Repeat.

If you get a coach (I have one) you are hooked and doomed....:0)
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
As someone who also came from a running background my recommendation is to really train the bike as much as you can. You are probably going to be able to dust a lot of people on the run but to do so you are going to

1) need to be near them after the bike
2) not be dead after the bike

both of which come from more bike training. dont worry about not hitting your usual running weekly mileage as well. You can still be fit doing 20-30 mpw plus biking and swimming instead of 50-60 mpw of just running

Besides that consistency is the number 1 priority as others have said. I found triathletes training bible to help me a good bit in understanding multisport training
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Tom_hampton] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Tom_hampton wrote:
Dolfan wrote:

I find a week rarely goes as planned so roll with it as best you can and don’t stack trainings to make it up. That was a hard lesson learned for me.


That's a super good point, worth repeating. There is no such thing as a makeup workout. If you miss what's on the schedule, then you need to prioritize what's important at the next training window---the next workout, or the missed workout. If you decide the missed workout is the more important one...then, you have to review the downstream schedule to make sure you don't have to rejuggle everything else. Usually its easier to just "let it go", and stick with the original plan.

The effects of a poorly executed rejuggling can extend for a week or more, before it all comes crashing down. A little extra fatigue here, a little less recovery there....just never quite getting back on top of it...and slowly grinding into the ground 10 days later, when you find you need to take three days off the get out of the hole.

I wouldn't accept that without caveats. If I miss a swim, I move that swim later in the week and have never really seen much of a negative impact. Another instance is a 30 minute easy run. I can put that on the end of the bike and be fine.

I think missing a *key* workout is what you can't double up. For instance, I have 2 workouts a day -- one key session and one supplementary session. I don't miss the key session. Come hell or high water, it gets done. I often rearrange or even sometimes skip the supplementary sessions. Maybe I'm doing myself a disservice.

Instagram | floathammerholdon | BSC Multisport

Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I'll put another vote in for consistency. I put in lots of miles, and don't sweat the complicated stuff. I'm also old school, and started in 1983. I got up early, rode my bike to the Y and swam, then rode to work, then rode home, and ran. On the weekends we would do long runs and long bikes. We didn't have plans or gadgets or fancy bikes back then, and just winged it. If we had free time we trained, simple as that. Even today, it really doesn't need to be any more complicated... unless you want it to be

I did my first triathlon on a Schwinn Varsity with running shoes for the bike and run. I had shit for equipment, but still podiumed because I trained a lot. The only thing I did different in the following years, was buy a nice bike, but still rode in running shoes, with the cages and strap pedals of that era (we all had racing flats back then, so it worked).

To this day, I'm still cheap (retired on a pension) and simple. I know I could be faster, but it's not that important to me. It's my hobby and I train within my enjoyment level. My bike is 10 years old, but still gets me on age group podiums. About the only differences for me, between then and now, is I have a wet suit, and tri shorts/shirt (better than the speedos we used to wear for all three disciplines!). And I use modern bike pedals/shoes. I still train a lot, believe in consistency, but haven't drank a lot of the modern day cool-ade. I've never had a coach, don't follow a schedule, don't have a bike computer, power meter, HRM, swift, or any of that stuff. You don't need any of that stuff to get started, or even get to your first race, don't sweat it, but you can learn about, and integrate things, as you go, and as your interest level and wallet will allow.

Athlinks / Strava
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [cloy] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
cloy wrote:
Tom_hampton wrote:
Dolfan wrote:

I find a week rarely goes as planned so roll with it as best you can and don’t stack trainings to make it up. That was a hard lesson learned for me.


That's a super good point, worth repeating. There is no such thing as a makeup workout. If you miss what's on the schedule, then you need to prioritize what's important at the next training window---the next workout, or the missed workout. If you decide the missed workout is the more important one...then, you have to review the downstream schedule to make sure you don't have to rejuggle everything else. Usually its easier to just "let it go", and stick with the original plan.

The effects of a poorly executed rejuggling can extend for a week or more, before it all comes crashing down. A little extra fatigue here, a little less recovery there....just never quite getting back on top of it...and slowly grinding into the ground 10 days later, when you find you need to take three days off the get out of the hole.

I wouldn't accept that without caveats. If I miss a swim, I move that swim later in the week and have never really seen much of a negative impact. Another instance is a 30 minute easy run. I can put that on the end of the bike and be fine.

I think missing a *key* workout is what you can't double up. For instance, I have 2 workouts a day -- one key session and one supplementary session. I don't miss the key session. Come hell or high water, it gets done. I often rearrange or even sometimes skip the supplementary sessions. Maybe I'm doing myself a disservice.

I suppose that’s a lot of the art of training, adapting a plan to fit one’s own reality. In the past, the desire to stick to a plan and be accountable to myself (and stubbornness) let overtraining sneak up on me.

I’m envious of your recovery ability! Maybe the OP has the same capacity but my experience is a cautionary tale just in case. I now err on the side of toning it down or calling it a day if I suspect I’m sliding back into the home.
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [Driva77] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
my first swim/bike/run race was in 1980. my first ironman was in february of 1981. the first swim/bike/run raced i produced was in august of 1981. so, as you see, for some of us, there was no process. there was just step-out-and-do-it, whether doing the race, or producing the race.

my entire athletic and business life has been one long 40-year exhibition of imposter syndrome. i have 2 pieces of advice:

1. swim 8000 hards or more a week, if you can, so much the better if you're lucky enough to find a masters swim team.
2. ask the folks here when it comes to any kind of change you want to make to your bike, either equipment or position.

Dan Empfield
aka Slowman
Quote Reply
Re: Overwhelmed Novice [cloy] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
cloy wrote:
I wouldn't accept that without caveats.

I agree. But, that was exactly my point:

Quote:
If you miss what's on the schedule, then you need to prioritize what's important at the next training window---the next workout, or the missed workout. If you decide the missed workout is the more important one...then, you have to review the downstream schedule to make sure you don't have to rejuggle everything else.

cloy wrote:
If I miss a swim, I move that swim later in the week and have never really seen much of a negative impact. Another instance is a 30 minute easy run. I can put that on the end of the bike and be fine.

I think missing a *key* workout is what you can't double up. For instance, I have 2 workouts a day -- one key session and one supplementary session. I don't miss the key session. Come hell or high water, it gets done. I often rearrange or even sometimes skip the supplementary sessions. Maybe I'm doing myself a disservice.

I've done many similar things. But, the ability to do that successfully, comes from self-knowledge---which usually comes from past failures. :-) For a novice, who is already claiming to be overwhelmed...I thought it was easier to just keep it simple.

Specifically to your "swim" example, my swim is the most influenced by other factors. So, if I move a hard swim...I'm going to have to be careful to place it or rejuggle B/R around it. I will probably do that, because the Swim is my weakest discipline. But, if I just move the swim to after a hard-run (or bike) day...I'll be "off" by 4s/100scy (dragging legs, poor core activation, some loss of timing, etc...you know, just a shitty swim)---I try to avoid shitty swims.

One could reasonably question how much you would lose by skipping the easy 30m run ("this" week), or how much you're gaining by bricking it with a bike. Since the run is my strongest, I'd just drop it and move on down the road. Others might make a different choice based on their own priority.
Quote Reply

Prev Next