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JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ?
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I already have read The Cyclist's Training Bible and Fast After 50.
I highly rate Joe Friel's books.
I want to buy The Triathlete's Training Bible. I see there is 4 different editions.
Is it worth it to get 4th edition ? What differs in the last edition from the 3rd (I can get a dirt cheap 3rd edition) ?

LOuis :-)
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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1-3 are more similar. 4th was a big update according to him.

Hooker training for the Sport of Scrum-Halves [Triathlon]
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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Garbage.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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Hire a coach
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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First I read "Faster after 50" and I just finished listening to "The Triathlon Bible". In the Bible he tells how to write ur own training plan. He's very convincing and I am tempted to do so mainly to avoid over-training & injury. But it sounds like the writing is a big time investment. So I was hoping to get advice here on the feasibility of writing one's own plan.

I'm 63, going into my 4th year of triathlons. I love the sport but I need the regimen of a plan and I figure a self-written plan would be the most flexible.

I'm surprised at the "garbage" comment made earlier in this thread - mainly bc no reasons to support the charge. The book is thorough and based on sports science as far as I can tell. Is for the serious athlete.

The copyright is 2016 - I would think that anything older would be for dinosaurs so the most recent is a must IMHO.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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I would get the 4th edition. I have the 3rd edition and borrowed the 4th edition and read most of it. It has some new and changed content that is more in line with what seems to be the current consensus, specifically around training periodization for preparing for long course races. If your budget is really low, the 3rd edition is fine and contains 90-95% of the same content.

It is a great book overall, and a great first book to read if you want to be knowledgeable enough to plan your own training without the help of a coach. It covers all the basics and doesn't assume too much prior knowledge. You can skip around and hit the necessary chapters to get a rough plan going in not much time.

I'd you're really interested training theory, I probably wouldn't stop with the Triathlete's Training Bible. There are (surprise!) different opinions on how one should train for triathlon. Two other books I would recommend are Triathlete's Guide to Training with Power by Philip Skiba and The Well Built Triathlete by Matt Dixon. You will find somewhat conflicting opinions between these books and if you follow each book's steps to create your own training plan, you will end up with three fairly different plans.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [KcDayan] [ In reply to ]
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KcDayan wrote:
Hire a coach

And lower your saddle!

All kidding aside, if someone is asking a question because of a few dollar difference in price, maybe hiring a coach isn't constructive advice.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [lombardi3g] [ In reply to ]
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lombardi3g wrote:

I'm surprised at the "garbage" comment made earlier in this thread - mainly bc no reasons to support the charge. The book is thorough and based on sports science as far as I can tell. Is for the serious athlete.


I have the original CTB and a TTB. Garbage is probably a bit harsh, but I understand the sentiment. Caveats: I haven't read either of my copies in....sheesh....20 years? And, I do not own the newer editions.

In general Joe massively overcomplicates things and presents concepts that sound like science, but aren't really. A couple of examples....One Legged Drills: These are worthless. I mean I guess its fine, if it breaks up the monotony of a 5 hour e1 ride, and keeps you going fine. But, in terms of a skill that you need to practice to be a better cyclist...um no. Or....muscular endurance. No such thing. Its called endurance.

Joe's approach laid out in the *TB series is like that guy at the pool that shows up with a bag of every toy known to man, lays them all out on deck, and does 30 minutes of toy-driven-drill after toy-driven-drill. Then gets out without ever having done a hard 100 yards.

Again, I haven't read the recent editions...since the inclusion of Training Stress Metrics. But, I've read most of Joe's web content (blogs, articles, etc). His explanations of TSS and CTL/ATL/TSB are misleading mostly, and in a few cases wrong. His advocacy for combining S/B/R TSS/CTL/ATL/TSB is poorly conceived---that's been discussed ad-naseum here on the forum.

That said, the *TB books are good for learning how to lay out a week, month, and year. Again, I think the books overcomplicate it, with all the periodation phases and stuff. But, I don't recall any of it being "wrong" per-se. So, if you don't know how to do that, the book(s) will help in that regard.

Does that make it a worthwhile purchase? I dunno. If you don't know how to separate out the good from the bad, then I'm not sure...probably not. Best case, you read (and believe) a bunch of crap, come on here to ask more questions and the collective has to clear up all the BS. Worst case, you read (and believe) a bunch of crap, and you don't come here to ask more questions and you just do what the book says.

Will you become a stronger triathlete following the book's guidelines? Probably. Anyone following a structure and doing regular training, with challenging workouts, will get better. That doesn't mean that the underlying "science" in the book is correct.

Again...I have NOT read the recent editions.
Last edited by: Tom_hampton: Oct 22, 20 7:12
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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I thoroughly enjoyed reading the first edition when I was in high school and just learning about the sport. For someone who is just staring out, it's probably too much information. For some who's been in the sport a while, they probably realize they can find better information elsewhere.

I'd go ahead and get the newest addition if you're going to buy it. Might as well.

Mark Saroni
____________________________________________________________
COACHING | TRAINING PLANS | STRAVA
MS Kinesiology | USA Cycling | USA Triathlon | USA Swimming
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [Tom_hampton] [ In reply to ]
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Read the book cover to cover in 2008, great information but the book might as well be titled, "So you've decided to go pro - how to succeed at your first professional year"



The sample working man's working woman's amateur schedule for the year was absurd - just imagine.

"Sorry boss Friday's gonna be a light day for me, I have a 2hr ME3 bike ride in the morning, 100x4 50 x8 swim at lunch, and I gotta leave early to go preview run the town 10k course. By the way would you mind if I used Frank's office to do some L3 stretching before I leave - sure you wont mind.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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I got the 3rd edition a couple of years ago and I was curious to see how it was because I heard a lot of it.
But it was a disappointment: I had read some books already about triathlon and I read a lot in the internet which all makes sense to me.
But this book? I must admit I could not really categorize the information to do something with it: I did not really understand it.
But that's just me: it seems generally regarded to be a standard, although maybe a bit outdated, work on triathon training.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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louisn wrote:
I already have read The Cyclist's Training Bible and Fast After 50.
I highly rate Joe Friel's books.
I want to buy The Triathlete's Training Bible. I see there is 4 different editions.
Is it worth it to get 4th edition ? What differs in the last edition from the 3rd (I can get a dirt cheap 3rd edition) ?

LOuis :-)

I have the 2nd edition and I find it useful but like some people said before it is overly complicated. Wayyyy too much detail for a person who has a job and other commitments. With that being said, if you are retired or semi-retired this could give you a good blueprint to really achieve aggressive goals in age group. However, if you mostly want consistent improvements over time and your goal is to have fun while participating in the sport then that book mat be overkill.

That being said, how is "Faster Over 50"? Is it worth the read?

------------------
http://dontletitdefeatyou.blogspot.com
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [Lock_N_Load] [ In reply to ]
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If you enjoy Friel's "science", imo, yes.

Louis :-)
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [TheStroBro] [ In reply to ]
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Pondering this thread's posting, I have to add that Friel's prodding on having a purpose for each workout is big for me. I know its obvious but over-trainers like me blow-off purposes and just try to maul the workout. Getting injured many times and reading Friel should be my cure.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [BigBoyND] [ In reply to ]
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BigBoyND wrote:
KcDayan wrote:
Hire a coach


And lower your saddle!

All kidding aside, if someone is asking a question because of a few dollar difference in price, maybe hiring a coach isn't constructive advice.

You have to understand that Friel is an excellent resource, then read the book, then understand why it's not an excellent resource. That's the progression. You can't skip a step.

Eric Reid
AeroFit | Instagram Portfolio Coaching and Bike Fitting
Chapel Hill, NC
Aerodynamic Optimized Bike Fitting, Retul Pre-Purchase Bike Fitting, USAT Level 1 Triathlon Coaching, Nutrition
Ask me: Scody Optimized Speed Suits | CeramicSpeed Oversized Pulley Systems | HUUB Skinsuits and Wetsuits | Bombshell Aerodynamic BMX Wheels
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [longtrousers] [ In reply to ]
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What dissapointed you?
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [ericMPro] [ In reply to ]
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ericMPro wrote:
BigBoyND wrote:
KcDayan wrote:
Hire a coach


And lower your saddle!

All kidding aside, if someone is asking a question because of a few dollar difference in price, maybe hiring a coach isn't constructive advice.


You have to understand that Friel is an excellent resource, then read the book, then understand why it's not an excellent resource. That's the progression. You can't skip a step.

^ Well put Eric. When you just start out its a great resource to understand how to create a plan, what workouts you should do, etc. I think it is really good for the big picture, not necessarily for the details of every workout (though it can give you ideas)
As you progress in the sport, learn what works and what doesn't for you, how your body reacts to different stimuli, etc. it becomes less useful
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [dgutstadt] [ In reply to ]
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For those who the tri bible is well a bit too walmart, how did it limit your tri performance. Rather than read it trying to find things like muscular endurance, did you just train a lot for a reasonable period of time mostly aerobically?
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [NordicSkier] [ In reply to ]
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NordicSkier wrote:
Garbage.

You're entitled to your opinion, but let me just offer a different perspective. Joe is probably one of the most honest, well read, and experienced coaches in the world of endurance sports. This may not be a good book for you, but for many inexperienced and upcoming triathletes looking to balance and understand how to get better in complicated sports, with limited understanding of physiology, his years of efforts to provide that for athletes with these books, and grow the sport, probably deserves better recognition.

I think if you look at his resume, and the fact there was very little information for athletes before he wrote these, you'll find a better appreciation.

His books also inspired many other coaches to write, like myself. When he and I did Triathlon Science together, where we brought in many experts, those experts came on board because of Joe and his experience, writing reputation, and respect.

Jim Vance
http://TodaysPlan.com.au (Disclosure: I am contracted with Today's Plan)
http://www.CoachVance.com/
Twitter @jimvance
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [JimVance] [ In reply to ]
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Thank you for your perspective. I have ordered the book and look forward to reading Joe’s views on the sport. I am betting that it will result in positive changes to my day to day training.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [JimVance] [ In reply to ]
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Fully agree. The book helped me a lot and found it very useful.

I just bought your book “running with power” by the way 😊. Will read it this week.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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if he's going to keep cranking out new editions he probably should stop calling it "bible".

Find out what it is in life that you don't do well, then don't
do that thing.
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [JimVance] [ In reply to ]
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JimVance wrote:
NordicSkier wrote:
Garbage.


You're entitled to your opinion, but let me just offer a different perspective. Joe is probably one of the most honest, well read, and experienced coaches in the world of endurance sports. This may not be a good book for you, but for many inexperienced and upcoming triathletes looking to balance and understand how to get better in complicated sports, with limited understanding of physiology, his years of efforts to provide that for athletes with these books, and grow the sport, probably deserves better recognition.

I think if you look at his resume, and the fact there was very little information for athletes before he wrote these, you'll find a better appreciation.

His books also inspired many other coaches to write, like myself. When he and I did Triathlon Science together, where we brought in many experts, those experts came on board because of Joe and his experience, writing reputation, and respect.

That's what I was saying above. Joe Friel teaches you how to think, and reading Joe Friel's book teaches you how to not need Joe Friel's book.

Eric Reid
AeroFit | Instagram Portfolio Coaching and Bike Fitting
Chapel Hill, NC
Aerodynamic Optimized Bike Fitting, Retul Pre-Purchase Bike Fitting, USAT Level 1 Triathlon Coaching, Nutrition
Ask me: Scody Optimized Speed Suits | CeramicSpeed Oversized Pulley Systems | HUUB Skinsuits and Wetsuits | Bombshell Aerodynamic BMX Wheels
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [louisn] [ In reply to ]
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Long-time reader, first-time caller: I own copies of The Cyclist's Training Bible (5th Ed), and Triathlete's Training Bible (4th Ed). There is significant overlap between the two titles: it's really only the drills and appendices that change between them. Is that what you're after?
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Re: JOe Friel's Triathlete's Training Bible: Worth getting 4th edition ? [ericMPro] [ In reply to ]
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ericMPro wrote:
JimVance wrote:
NordicSkier wrote:
Garbage.


You're entitled to your opinion, but let me just offer a different perspective. Joe is probably one of the most honest, well read, and experienced coaches in the world of endurance sports. This may not be a good book for you, but for many inexperienced and upcoming triathletes looking to balance and understand how to get better in complicated sports, with limited understanding of physiology, his years of efforts to provide that for athletes with these books, and grow the sport, probably deserves better recognition.

I think if you look at his resume, and the fact there was very little information for athletes before he wrote these, you'll find a better appreciation.

His books also inspired many other coaches to write, like myself. When he and I did Triathlon Science together, where we brought in many experts, those experts came on board because of Joe and his experience, writing reputation, and respect.


That's what I was saying above. Joe Friel teaches you how to think, and reading Joe Friel's book teaches you how to not need Joe Friel's book.

I read the older version from a library borrow a bunch of years ago; I think my main problem with it is that if I recall, it had like no premade plans for any distance. You had to build it up from scratch, using this insanely complicated system that had like 10 different 'skill focuses' that had to be matched up with each other.

I much prefer having a premade plan in place for the base, and tinkering with that to adapt my needs per my skills.

I tried to make a plan a la Friel's guide and it was just nuts how unnecessarily complicated it was. If it hasn't changed much I'd go so far as to say that it would be unnecessarily complicated even for pros.

Matt Dixon's 'Fast Track triathlete' is an example of a book I really found useful, with useful SIMPLE philosophies. He says to pretty much keep it as simple as possible. His workouts aren't so widely varied week to week that you get confused, and you don't need to micromange skill sets due to the workout design.
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