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Is foam rolling a myth?
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Just got back from my sports chiropractor's office for some IT band issues. After he did some dry needling and graston therapy, I asked where I should roll at home to help increase my hip mobility. He said in absolutely no way should I be rolling out and that a lot of the studies coming out now are showing that it's ineffective. He's incredibly knowledgeable and very skilled, but this took me back. Thoughts?

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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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I don't stretch (aside from nervous race day stretching), rolled maybe 4-5 times in my life and have had one massage my entire life. No injuries (knock on wood). I say that not as some humble brag or whatever, just that I've never done it and I've been successful.

The few times I have tried my wife's foam roller out it did seem to do 'something' in terms of working my muscles out and I would see the benefit. But I'm lazy, don't care and not rolling hasn't been an issue. I'd say the best thing (for me) has been a varied program and really just listening to my body in terms of when to pull back or when to throw in a swim or an easy day.

Do what works for you.

________________________________________________________
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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cloy wrote:
Just got back from my sports chiropractor's office for some IT band issues. After he did some dry needling and graston therapy, I asked where I should roll at home to help increase my hip mobility. He said in absolutely no way should I be rolling out and that a lot of the studies coming out now are showing that it's ineffective. He's incredibly knowledgeable and very skilled, but this took me back. Thoughts?

I'd be willing to read the "studies coming out now" if you can get them from him. Until then, I'm going to continue to roll.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [DJRed] [ In reply to ]
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So he does some 'dry needling' and then goes on to tell you not to do it yourself? I think I'd give his 'advice' a pass!
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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😂I lol'd, well done
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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Foam rolling is amazing, but I've read that if you are already injured, excessive rolling can irritate an aggravated IT band tendon or worsening existing micro-tears. We all know rolling hurts like hell, so it makes sense to me.




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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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Foam rolling does something. But the real question is do you in a situation where you even need it. An acme brick does something. Do you need it?
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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going out on a limb and guessing that you inadvertently left out a bit of stuff so keep that in mind with this reply.

Rolling the IT band itself won't do a damn bit of good as it'd be akin to trying to stretch your seatbelt. As you've probably read most ITB issues originate elsewhere and diagnosing/treating these issues is really what you want to get at. I'll leave that part alone.

That said, I don't think you'll find anyone who says that foam rolling is a waste of time. Many people spend a minute going up and down their legs without really doing anything and think they're helping. I was taught to roll before I do my static and dynamic stretching but the for the lower body rolling part I spend 10-15 minutes easily starting at the hips finding trigger points and working them out either with the roller (4" pvc) or the softball/lacrosse. After a rough weekend it'll approach 20 min. Definitely not a strict substitute for a good massage but it keeps things working between appointments.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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Whenever I feel like I need to roll, I roll. Then I feel better afterward. But I'm not on some daily rolling routine or anything like that...just as-needed.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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I had some it band issues a few years back, got worse & worse until I started rolling. Cleared up pretty quickly after that & it's not returned (however I do keep rolling).

Had a similar experience with an angry glute medius.

Why it works I've no idea, maybe it loosens muscles, maybe the pain whilst rolling helps to accelerate healing, either way it seems to do something.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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"Foam rolling isn’t just a workout—it’s a lifestyle."

https://bunnyears.com/...-50mph-hana-michels/
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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cloy wrote:
Just got back from my sports chiropractor's office for some IT band issues. After he did some dry needling and graston therapy, I asked where I should roll at home to help increase my hip mobility. He said in absolutely no way should I be rolling out and that a lot of the studies coming out now are showing that it's ineffective. He's incredibly knowledgeable and very skilled, but this took me back. Thoughts?

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.

There is very little evidence to support that chiro spinal manipulation does anything positive.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [Tim_Canterbury] [ In reply to ]
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Tim_Canterbury wrote:
going out on a limb and guessing that you inadvertently left out a bit of stuff so keep that in mind with this reply.

Rolling the IT band itself won't do a damn bit of good as it'd be akin to trying to stretch your seatbelt. As you've probably read most ITB issues originate elsewhere and diagnosing/treating these issues is really what you want to get at. I'll leave that part alone.

That's about tje same as my sports physio told me.
The IT band itself is FAR too strong and stiff in the longitudinal direction for rollering to do anything (but hurt).

But rollering good for muscles normally. Tho agsin as you state, not on an injury as it just worsens the damage.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [TTF70.3] [ In reply to ]
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TTF70.3 wrote:
cloy wrote:
Just got back from my sports chiropractor's office for some IT band issues. After he did some dry needling and graston therapy, I asked where I should roll at home to help increase my hip mobility. He said in absolutely no way should I be rolling out and that a lot of the studies coming out now are showing that it's ineffective. He's incredibly knowledgeable and very skilled, but this took me back. Thoughts?

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.

There is very little evidence to support that chiro spinal manipulation does anything positive.

This.

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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [xcrogers] [ In reply to ]
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I also do not stretch or foam roll. Went through 10 months of 18+ hours per week IM training this year w/o stretching or rolling once.

Made it through just fine

In the past, the only time I ever got injured was when I stretched. So I stopped stretching.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [BobAjobb] [ In reply to ]
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http://
BobAjobb wrote:
Tim_Canterbury wrote:
going out on a limb and guessing that you inadvertently left out a bit of stuff so keep that in mind with this reply.

Rolling the IT band itself won't do a damn bit of good as it'd be akin to trying to stretch your seatbelt. As you've probably read most ITB issues originate elsewhere and diagnosing/treating these issues is really what you want to get at. I'll leave that part alone.

That's about tje same as my sports physio told me.
The IT band itself is FAR too strong and stiff in the longitudinal direction for rollering to do anything (but hurt).

But rollering good for muscles normally. Tho agsin as you state, not on an injury as it just worsens the damage.

Yep third on this. Agree that the physio is right in that rolling the it band is pointless and there is probably no where you could roll to help the band as it needs more concentrated release to get the right area.

Blanket saying rolling is not effective seems like the OP misunderstood what the therapist was saying.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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cloy wrote:
Just got back from my sports chiropractor's office for some IT band issues. After he did some dry needling and graston therapy, I asked where I should roll at home to help increase my hip mobility. He said in absolutely no way should I be rolling out and that a lot of the studies coming out now are showing that it's ineffective. He's incredibly knowledgeable and very skilled, but this took me back. Thoughts?

Aren’t chiros quacks?
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [Triheaven] [ In reply to ]
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Triheaven wrote:
So he does some 'dry needling' and then goes on to tell you not to do it yourself? I think I'd give his 'advice' a pass!

My exact reaction. He's telling OP not to do things at home that could help, but instead go and see him.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...articles/PMC4637917/

Good survey paper there. Some possible marginal recovery benefits. Though not enough to motivate me to invest the time, generally.
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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If using a foam rolling to roll the IT band, yes it is ineffective. The IT band is far too dense for the foam roller to really do anything. The muscles underneath it, that's a different story.

Foam rolling can be used in a multitude of ways, so my counter question to him would be. What are the studies measuring and what is the goal of using the foam roller?
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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cloy wrote:
Just got back from my sports chiropractor's office for some IT band issues. After he did some dry needling and graston therapy, I asked where I should roll at home to help increase my hip mobility. He said in absolutely no way should I be rolling out and that a lot of the studies coming out now are showing that it's ineffective. He's incredibly knowledgeable and very skilled, but this took me back. Thoughts?

Mechanism on why it "helps" is a bit unclear, but most evidence/theory points to it reducing the perception of "tightness" neurologically (to put it in layman's terms).

Most experts agree is doesn't "break up" scar tissue or really do anything mechanically to soft tissue.

It's not really a tool to treat injured tissue either. But boy, I sure do have patients walk in my office who roll the hell out of themselves. In the back of my mind I usually think...dang, you should spend that 30 minutes and go run or swim a bit more! :-) Just yesterday, 23yr old trail runner who came into my office had 3-4 bruises all along her lateral thigh...from you guessed it...."rolling out her IT band" . If anything, this set her recovery back!

Is it a horrible tool?...I wouldn't say that...is it this amazing, self treatment tool that can fix or help anything? (which seems to be the perception to some)...no. I usually end up telling folks .."if you think it's REALLY helping you, then use it a little"...but honestly, I end up telling folks they are doing it too much or to chill out with the roller as we discuss where to spend their time recovering.

CB
Physical Therapist/Endurance Coach
http://www.cadencept.net
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [cloy] [ In reply to ]
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For years, I had a daily 30 minute stretching and rolling routine. I thought it was preventing injuries and helping recovery. 2 years ago, I quit cold turkey. Almost exactly one month later, and completely out of the blue (I wasn't training specifically for it), I easily shattered my masters 5K PR, by 40 seconds. I haven't stretched or rolled since, and have continued to train and race as well as ever. I know now, that it wasn't doing anything for me, except give my dogs and excuse to jump all over me.

Athlinks / Strava
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [Triheaven] [ In reply to ]
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Triheaven wrote:
So he does some 'dry needling' and then goes on to tell you not to do it yourself? I think I'd give his 'advice' a pass!

x1000

Next races on the schedule: La Quinta Desert Tri 2019, St George 70.3 2019, IM Boulder 2019, IMAZ 2019
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Re: Is foam rolling a myth? [907Tri] [ In reply to ]
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907Tri wrote:
What are the studies measuring and what is the goal of using the foam roller?

Per the link above, the studies have investigated their use in 1) improving joint range of motion, 2) improving muscle recovery and reduction in DOMS, and 3) improving performance.

The 14 studies surveyed indicate some evidence it has at least a marginal effect on 1, 2. But nothing on 3).
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