Login required to started new threads

Login required to post replies

Ironman boulder low elevation training?
Quote | Reply
So for all who have raced Ironman Boulder and live at low elevation this question is for you. How much did the elevation affect you? I live and train at 600 ft elevation. I can't afford to get to the race more than a couple days early. How much do you think this would affect me. I know all people are different but in generaldo you think it has a big effect?
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
When I moved to the area after living in the Midwest for years, the altitude totally kicked my ass, but only for tempo level efforts and above.

Higher altitude drops your VO2 max, so you'll feel it more the closer you push to that level. Down around aerobic threshold you'll still feel like you are trying too hard to be going that slow, but you'll survive. A few days isn't enough to significantly adapt, so I'd just factor it into your pacing plan



sometimes you just have to eat the cake
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I've never done long course in elevation, but I did do an olympic (boulder peak) coming from 500-600ft elevation (chicago area).

Last year, I happen to vacation out in colorado and decided last minute to do the race. I got there about a week before the race. I had no goals, but I was training for an IM in August. I paced myself purely on RPE, which I am very good at with running and okay with biking. I did use a power meter and HRM. My times sucked. I think my run was slower than my IM. However, I did bike up mt evans a few days earlier, but I don't think that made much of a difference.

I go out to colorado at least once a year and for me working out in Z1 is fine. Anything higher, I think my performance suffers. I bike up pike's peak last week and for the power out put, my HR and fatigue didn't match the RPE. I did an "easy" 8 mile run a few days later which felt like a 14 mile run in the last 2 miles. My HR was 5-10 bpm higher for same run at sea level.

I don't think any of my tri or running friends have gone from low to high elevation for races. However, I have a few outdoorsy (hikers, backpacker, etc.) friends and they all have different experience with elevation (minimal to very significant even with mild activity). I've hiked a decent amount in elevation and had minimal or no effect and as I said earlier it was when I was Z2 or higher that I noticed the effects.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [hubcaps] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
So far this is not encouraging me to sign up. I know Boulder sits around 5,400 of elevation, anyone know at what elevation the air starts to affect people?
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I live in Ireland and I have done a lot of racing and running at altitude. I did Boulder a while back and I dropped all of my paces by about 5% and did just fine. I also spent a week there before the race. YMMV. I didn't think it was a big deal.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
dwgrenle wrote:
So far this is not encouraging me to sign up. I know Boulder sits around 5,400 of elevation, anyone know at what elevation the air starts to affect people?
I believe the NCAA starts having altitude adjustments starting around 3000'
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I live in LA and did most of my IM training on PCH in Malibu, which is obviously sea level.

I feel like everyone reacts to elevation differently. I had never raced a Tri in elevation before, however I ski alot, and spend a decent amount of time in altitude, so that may have helped me. Not sure.

I really didn't have a problem at Boulder this year with the elevation, HOWEVER the heat and dry air made racing this year damn near impossible for me. Take your nutrition and hydration seriously, or it will come back and bite you in the ass.

-------------------------------------------------------------
Tough Times Don't Last, Tough People Do.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
dwgrenle wrote:
So far this is not encouraging me to sign up. I know Boulder sits around 5,400 of elevation, anyone know at what elevation the air starts to affect people?

You can expect about a 3% reduction in power for every 1K over 3000ft

-------------------------------------------------------------
Tough Times Don't Last, Tough People Do.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
dwgrenle wrote:
So far this is not encouraging me to sign up. I know Boulder sits around 5,400 of elevation, anyone know at what elevation the air starts to affect people?


Maybe my n=1 will help. I did IM Boulder after 6 months of training at sea level. I'm new to tri (those were my first 6 months in any of the sports) so I don't have reference points indicating how much the altitude slowed me down, but I didn't consciously notice it at all. The race itself felt no different than training in my hot coastal town. Overall my swim time was just barely slower than expected, my bike was right on target (maybe even a bit fast), and my run suffered a little but I think that was due more to the ridiculous heat. Putting it all together I nailed my sub-11-hour goal by a decent margin.

The thought of altitude stressed me out for the first few months, but then I just got in the mindset that 5400 feet isn't a huge deal. During the race I paid a lot of attention to RPE and heart rate, and stayed within myself. The altitude was fine, and I really enjoyed being in Boulder. I'd recommend it.
Last edited by: first_doom: Jul 11, 18 18:17
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
The swim is hurt the most because if you go too hard you'll be stuck treading water trying to catch your breath. The bike and run just back off a bit if you start to feel it.

People always worry about the elevation; worry about the sun and dehydration, but still sign up.

---
The point is, ladies and gentleman, that speed, for lack of a better word, is good. Speed is right, Speed works. Speed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [Toby] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Toby wrote:
The swim is hurt the most because if you go too hard you'll be stuck treading water trying to catch your breath. The bike and run just back off a bit if you start to feel it.

People always worry about the elevation; worry about the sun and dehydration, but still sign up.

Exactly

-------------------------------------------------------------
Tough Times Don't Last, Tough People Do.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [Toby] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Toby wrote:

People always worry about the elevation; worry about the sun and dehydration, but still sign up.

As a Boulder resident, this is probably the bigger factor.

The above poster is a physiologist employed by PEARL iZUMi. However, statements are not made on behalf of nor reflective of PEARL iZUMI in any manner... unless they're good, then they count.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
instagram.com/robertpickels
twitter.com/RobertPickels
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I've done Boulder 70.3 in 2011 and 2017. Coming back for 2018.
Also raced the full in 2015.

Personally altitude is a small factor. It becomes a bigger factor as the temps rise. Coming out early isn't going to get you substantial adaptations in time for the race unless you come out for months to train and adapt.

I also performed a Q&A with the gal that did Boulder 2017 full in Fire Fighter gear. It was the heat, not altitude that got her.

https://www.facebook.com/EnduranceWarrior/videos/1910853252269841/


Ryan
http://www.SetThePaceTriathlon.com
http://www.TriathlonTrainingDaddy.com
Sample 70.3/140.6 Training Plans
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Live in Kansas and did the full in 2016. Was out there about a week before the race. Seemed to notice it a bit on the swim as catching a breath was slightly more difficult. Didn't notice any differences on the bike at all. During the run I walked every aid station anyways. I didn't seem to struggle breathing while running more just tired from swimming and riding already I think. Was my first full Ironman so don't have anything to compare it to but didn't feel like the altitude had a major effect on my day. Might be different if I was closer to the pointy end and was desperate to save myself a few minutes. But trying to just complete it and enjoy the experience i wouldn't worry about the altitude.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [dwgrenle] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I live and train in TX, raced IM Boulder this year.

Most say that you notice it more on the swim, this was not the case for me. I had trouble holding the power number that I had in mind on the bike, and my HR was more elevated than usual. In turn, my run suffered greatly.

With that being said, all this could have been due to the intense heat and sun, rather than elevation.
Quote Reply
Re: Ironman boulder low elevation training? [BTEEZY28] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
The sun intensity here will kick your ass. 70 can feel like 90 and you can dehydrate yourself easily because you don’t know you’re sweating due to the low humidity.

-----------------------------------------------------------
De Soto Sport Athlete
Formerly Draketriathlon
Quote Reply