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Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on?
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After spending a decent amount of time with budding ITU and long-course pros and their coaches over the last couple of weeks, it's been pretty eye-opening how tough it still is to get by as a pro triathlete. Most people that I talked to are still on some sort of personal timeline, where they're able to fund themselves from savings/parents for 2 years and then move on to normal jobs. And when I've been pressing the athletes and coaches in our conversations these last couple of weeks about what they're doing to reach out to potential sponsors, I've been getting some form of the same response "Well, we are usually so exhausted from a 25+ hour training week to have spent too much time on that," which is why I think there is room for an agent/manager to help out.

I don't want to turn this into an ITU vs. long-course debate and how there is a lot more money in long-course racing, etc.; I am well aware of that, but with the WTS getting an NBC deal and the Olympic cycle kicking into full gear, I'm still convinced that there are ways to unlock more value for ITU racers. Guys like Ben Kanute have had to add 70.3s into their annual schedule, both because they can get a lot more prize money but sponsors also prefer seeing their product at the front of those longer races with big age group fields. I think it's also very dangerous how USAT does a reimbursement policy for ITU races as opposed to covering costs upfront; currently you have to get top 15 at a WTS race to get reimbursed by USAT, and that creates a tremendous amount of pressure on young athletes who are already struggling to get by. You had a mechanical incident on the bike in Yokohama? Well, guess you won't get reimbursed for that $2,000 flight/hotel/meal combo. But I think that's a separate discussion.

Is there truly a market for "content creation" in triathlon, and how do pros start to really monetize that? I think the videos of Talbot Cox and Triathlon Taren are a step in the right direction, and I've actually been pretty impressed with the views they are getting and the social media activity that comes along with that. However, it comes down to a question that hasn't really been solved yet: what is the monetary value of a view/like/retweet on social media? Say a pro does a 30 second plug for a bike company prior to a workout video starting, and that content is pushed aggressively to the triathlon market, even if that leads to a couple of people around the world looking into purchasing said bike, wouldn't that be worth it to pay up a few hundred dollars? I know that the current going rate for Instagram is if you have roughly 50k followers, companies will pay around $200 for a sponsored post, but I think there is still room for negotiation there.

I also know it's important that, unless you're Jan Frodeno Olympic/Ironman World Champion, the athletes are the ones that have to pitch their value proposition to potential sponsors, as opposed to have companies come flocking to them. With my times/national success I had no business being a "pro swimmer," but I reached out to an old friend a couple of years ago who works for Blueseventy with a pitch. I looked up the photographer that they had been using for their previous catalogue shoots, found out roughly what his rate was, and then reached out to my contact saying I would take photos in their entire new swimwear line for half the cost (my roommate at the time was into photography) and I'd wear their new suits at my races for the rest of the year. Two weeks later we had a check for a couple grand and a living room full of swim gear, spent four hours the next day shooting and editing, and sent them back a google drive with 40 photos, which I still see them regularly post today. My point being that I think that there are opportunities for budding athletes out there, it just does take some effort and smart value propositions.

Another side story. I had a friend from high school who dropped out of college 6 years ago to sign a $20k/year contract with an eSports team and moved out to LA (the game he played is called League of Legends, and his gamer name is Meteos for anyone who knows the game). I also don't want to start a debate about the legitimacy of eSports, but I think there are a lot of lessons to be learned from their meteroic rise in the last five years. A few months ago I was helping him with his contract negotiations for $600k/year with his new org. The industry went from playing out of parents' basements to 7-figure deals in about six years, and I think the biggest factor in that is the content creation industry and the financial support of large companies (for example, Riot Games, the creator of League of Legends, is now a multi-billion dollar company and invests a lot of money in the pro league). Meteos has a big following on Twitch (the streaming platform), YouTube, and Twitter, all of which provide additional visibility for sponsors and give him the ability to grow his personal brand and connect with fans.

I'm sorry for the brain dump, but I'm really passionate about growing endurance sports and making it feasible for endurance athletes to make a good living while doing so. I'm interested in hearing others' thoughts and brainstorming other ideas.

The Gram: @agyenis
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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This is interesting to me...(finance guy)

So the e-sports - albeit it does not make sense to me because I do not play video games - the profit market is huge. You have all sorts of forums discussing games and strategy, online video commentators and content, HOURS spent playing, and multiple age group levels that can play. Everyone I grew up with had consoles. Super Nintendo, N-64, Sega, PS1, Dreamcast, etc etc etc. I was the only one who spent most of my time outside. The games are $50 bucks a pop. They all had multiple. Once you get into those crazy games people buy items and sell items. It is a virtual marketplace for virtual items. 600K a year for one top guy for people to talk to and study strategy and such is a drop in the hat to most of these publicly traded video game companies.

Triathlon on the other hand. Not so much. There is no viewing market. That is the issue. Sure you can watch the Olympics but that is a 2 hour race where you just see people swimming, running, and biking. To an outsider that is pretty boring and not something people can just "jump into" - like buying a PS4 and a game. There are forums sure (slowtwitch that is pretty much it). Most of these companies are small. They compete with Nike, Adidas, etc for shoes - but can dominate in the apparel because Nike doesn't even see a large enough market to dive into it. There just isnt money and isnt a profit margin.

To evaluate the market of price per clicks, price per posts, reach, content, audience, demographics, etc one would really need to see the financials of the company at a pretty granular level to make a forecast (I build finance model for forecasting). It would take some time. Companies probably have them but doubt they would release them. Well some might not, the bigger ones who outsourced a guy might.

It is an interesting topic though. I like where you are going with it all. You would essentially play a "market maker" much like in finance. If you could quantify and justify a price per view or something and present it to a company and have a presentation such as "X athlete has Y amount of followers. Of those Y followers - 95% appear to compete in trisports/running. Of the said people - Z of those people make ZZ amount of money and have ZZZ of expendable income. Each appear to buy a new Q product 7 times per year on average. etc etc" and it keeps going but you could essentially come up with a somewhat decent/accurate forecast for how much money these companies could potentially make her a specific athlete based off his/her audience. It would take a decent amount of work for sure but it would give some stated number to a company and probably help them out too. It would help them in their targeting marketing - which you could probably partner with to better target a specific audience. This could then be branched even further because triathletes are "runners" but they still look at runners and new running products and visit running websites and forums. Say for instance - Bud Light - they sponsored surfers for a good while. Surfers drink beer. Odd target audience but it worked as a campaign. Surfers like to party (hard).

I am full on just thinking as I type but if you could find a way to quantify better a bunch of variables and help a company out - you could probably negotiate some pretty solid deals for athletes. They need to market in a way that circumvents commercials/television/etc and goes more toward hard ads and social media...BUT most of the age groups that are bigger - are the generation that does not use social media..so how do you reach those people? Suggest perhaps that your athlete makes guests appearances at Master swim meets. some of those athletes may go into the trisports world after seeing some guy there they dont know but look into. Suggest they make appearances at a Gran Fondo.

Ok I am done haha but you get the gist. Or I just rambled. Back to work and forecasting money for a bank
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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There has never been one way to skin the pro for dollars cat, and some of your assumptions are a little out of whack. Even Jan Frondeno has to market himself, yes it is easier if you win Kona, but it does not just come to you without effort. Tim DeBoom won Kona a few times and made almost no money, he did not know how to play that game, and thus wasted the biggest playing card we have in the game.

There has never been parity with dollars earned and results either. Sometimes it works out that way because the best athlete does the best job at marketing, but often times a 10th place person will outearn the 2nd place one. Anyone remember Anna Kournakova?? Probably earned more than virtually everyone above and below her. Skinning the cat her way, but the dollars all spend the same.

There are many things a manager/agent should be looking at when trying to maximize $$ for a pro athlete. What races are you going to, do you have a chance to podium or win? What did you do with sponsors, big bonus payouts and little salary, or the opposite? What value does your athlete have, do you contact RD and negotiate start money, guaranteed against purse money, perhaps a pre race talk/signing fee?

What you described in the payout for expenses for performance is really just a performance bonus. You may not like it, but it ensures that USAT isn't throwing their money away on non contenders. Sure you could get a flat, but that is racing, you won't get any bonuses or prize money either. That is the dog eat dog world of pro racing. I used to get on Jordan for some of his race choices, they just didn't make any sense to me as a racing pro. To me it is way better to do some small cherry pick in the middle of no where, someplace where you are the star and headliner, make a few grand to shake some hands and crush the AG dreams. But others will show up at Oceanside 70.3 where there are 25 pros, 15 of them top pros who most likely will beat you, and even if only 5 of them do, you still did not pay expenses. I suppose that is all related to the chasing of Kona points too, dont even get me started on how stupid that is for a lot of aspiring pros...

Good luck, there has always been room for just about 2 or 3 agents in our sport, at least ones than can make any money at it. Probably the only thing harder than making a living as a pro triathlete is a pro triathlon agent... (-;
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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Monetizing digital content,and using brand ambassadors...

Are you planning to rep Mola, or Duffy?

Germaine to your questions:

https://cyclingtips.com/...clists-social-media/

no sponsors | no races | nothing to see here
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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A friend of mine and I were having this discussion on a long bike ride. Summarized, our opinion was that the value you offer me (the sponsor) is that you help me make more money. That's it - pure and simple ROI. If I can spend $10K sponsoring you, or $10K on marketing or product development, the better ROI wins. So many brands have surged and waned in popularity within our niche sport - how can an association with an athlete lead to a sustained growth path? That's the question that I think you'd have to answer.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [TruckeeTri] [ In reply to ]
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Summarized, our opinion was that the value you offer me (the sponsor) is that you help me make more money. That's it - pure and simple ROI.//

Well this is what I'm talking about, many ways to skin the cat. You are only talking about endemic smallish sponsors. Once you branch out to non endemic ones, it becomes more about eyeballs, hits, and name recognition. When gatorade or Bud Lite sponsor triathlon and athletes, they do not measure if you sold enough beer or drinks to warrant your sponsorship. Rinny and a few others have chocolate milk as a sponsor, they do not and cannot count milk sold per athlete. What they are after is a recognition and association with those athletes and the sport in general. I believe they refer to it as impressions. Rinny gets her chocolate mile logo on the Kona coverage, there are 4 million watching, that is the impression count. And the same now goes for social media. Got a million twitter followers and you tweet about whatever sponsor you are hocking, those are impressions.


But you are right, if you seek only endemic sponsors like a bike company, and you do not crush records, have fastest splits, and get to T2 first every time, you are not going to sell many bikes. And even if you do all that and you are a woman, you still won't sell bikes.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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I work for Hookit - which was referenced in the Cycling Tips article.

That's a big part of what we do- help put a quantifiable value on social and digital media. We work with teams, athletes, events, olympic federations, as well as buy side customers that invest sponsorship dollars in sports.

Brands want to make smarter sponsorship investments
Teams/athletes want to showcase the value they can deliver to brands.

In this way, all parties understand the return on investment of their sponsorship.

Happy to chat about the industry - send me an email at wparsel@hookit.com

https://www.strava.com/athletes/228137
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [philly1x] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks for sharing that article, I actually hadn't read it before, and it's always eye opening as someone with a swim/run background to see how globally popular a lot of the best cyclists in the world are. I know that the Hookit rep commented above, but my initial thought after reading this article is that these numbers are astronomically higher than what brands actually pay out for social media ads, and I'm not actually believing those numbers yet. The Wout van Aert picture stands out to me, where they claim that image is worth almost $17,500 to Red Bull, and it honestly took me a minute to even find where Red Bull was located in the posting haha. He didn't even mention anything about Red Bull in the caption. And with 12,000 likes and 125 comments, I wouldn't expect a company to pay more than $1,000 for this post, even if he specifically mentioned Red Bull in the caption.

The Gram: @agyenis
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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This is the same issue pro cycling has struggled with for decades. Zero ticket sales. Extremely limited TV audience -- we're not competing for the next TV contract with any stick and ball sports. We get laughed out of the room.

And the athlete sponsor has to be able to justify the investment by tying the investment to the additional sales it generates.

Just as with basketball, football, tennis, etc. . . . the athlete's value is tied directly to their attractiveness. (There, I said it.) Most athletes that pull down the big endorsements are little more than models and/or spokesmodels. A championship title of some sort CAN help, but isn't really necessary. If they look GREAT in a swimsuit, their sponsorship value as an "athlete" is multiplied. If they are physically attractive and articulate and the sponsor wants TV commercials, the value as an "athlete" is multiplied.

I guess what I'm saying is, an athlete's endorsement value has a lot less to do with their athletic achievements than it does with their physical attractiveness -- both male and female. Less than 1/100th of 1% of the target audience knows or cares who won Kona this year. (Heck, most of the target audience doesn't know what a Kona is!) Find a stunning male/female model, enter them in a triathlon if you must, and pose them with a bike or a set of goggles in a tiny swimsuit. There's your value proposition. Eyeballs always win.
Last edited by: FlashBazbo: May 15, 18 13:55
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [monty] [ In reply to ]
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monty wrote:

But you are right, if you seek only endemic sponsors like a bike company, and you do not crush records, have fastest splits, and get to T2 first every time, you are not going to sell many bikes. And even if you do all that and you are a woman, you still won't sell bikes.


Very true.
Most people can’t afford to go out and buy a bike just because a pro rides one fast. What we can afford is clothing and nutrition. Look at your favorite football, soccer, baseball players and if you see them with a cool cap or t-shirt, you can go out and buy one for $30.

It has to be more than just the sport, hopefully superleague can do more for the athletes and market the sport better. We need a format that is exciting to watch for non athletes, press confreneces and rivalries.
Last edited by: TriguyBlue: May 15, 18 13:51
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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Need to assign a monetary value to older masters athletes and parents who aren't on social media, but present at community events, races, and rides and have tremendous buying power.

Look at more traditional sports like cross country skiing, tennis, golf where reps just give away product to athletes and don't expect to be plugged on social media.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [philly1x] [ In reply to ]
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philly1x wrote:
Are you planning to rep Mola, or Duffy?

I'd rep Duffy........
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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Meteos is pulling in 600k. Wow. The pay-checks have definitely gone up!

I don't think you can compare eSports and Triathlon. The dynamics are totally different as are the demographics.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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Totally good point agyenis - it's not meant to be a value for what to pay that athlete, it's simply an estimated media value. We work with a few third party agencies, brands, and researchers to determine what the market rates would be for digital advertising.

So it's more of a reflection of how much a digital ad would cost on a price per engagement basis. In this case, simply the product placement of the helmet.

https://www.strava.com/athletes/228137
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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"Well, we are usually so exhausted from a 25+ hour training week to have spent too much time on that," which is why I think there is room for an agent/manager to help out.

Yes and no. Pro sports is all about connection to the fans, especially a niche sport like triathlon.
Triathlete's who don't have time because they are training too hard are missing the point of being a pro. Go back to your office job.
Finishing in the top 10 at Kona means shit if your social media presence is almost nil.
Pro triathlete's don't need agents, they need to get their heads out of their asses.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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agyenis wrote:

.... for half the cost (my roommate at the time was into photography) and I'd wear their new suits at my races for the rest of the year. Two weeks later we had a check for a couple grand and a living room full of swim gear.

....but I'm really passionate about growing endurance sports and making it feasible for endurance athletes to make a good living while doing so. I'm interested in hearing others' thoughts and brainstorming other ideas.

Talented people with passion like you are part of the problem, doing stuff for half of the price is sending signal to vendors it can be done cheaper, they will keep getting "one off" talented amateurs instead of hiring professionals, amateurs that have regular job to survive because one of job will be only good to brag about around the dinner table, in the mean time this takes away small chunks from Pros.

Best example is "ambassador" strategy, cheap and very effective. Give average guys with good following (1000+)some free nutrition bars\products name him ambassador, exposure from 100 ambassadors with even 1000 followers will be higher than of some single top Pros. Cost of those 100 ambassadors will be 0$ give them 40% discounts on products, (you can actually make money on them, since you make 60% on the product or more)

Next step: go to Asia. Huge markets, large amount of people and big $ displacement. You can find really talented people for fraction of USA talent, and sell product to much larger population with big $.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [NordicSkier] [ In reply to ]
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NordicSkier wrote:
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"Well, we are usually so exhausted from a 25+ hour training week to have spent too much time on that," which is why I think there is room for an agent/manager to help out.


Aw 25 hours? That's cute.
Last edited by: SankaCoffee: May 16, 18 7:45
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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Hello!

May I suggest insurance companies? Particularly, ones selling health insurance! Am interested in knowing your opinions too.

Warmest regards,
Joel Ash
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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From the people I know that have been successful with getting sponsors most of them have not focused on equipment companies, but on companies with either a local connection or high profit margin.

Equipment manufactures have slim margins, so if you can get some stuff for free + bonus if you win, that can be a good deal for an up and coming athletes.

The local connection can be used, but it is maybe harder here in the USA where you do not have clubs the same why as other countries.

This was written by a Norwegian skier Petter Reistad.
It is about how to get sponsors. It is a chapter in the book he wrote as a 20y old.
https://www.langrenn.com/bli-raa-paa-ski-slik-blir-du-sponset.5788451-59025.html



Member of Valhalla Racing Team
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [pknight] [ In reply to ]
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Yeah, I've been talking with some Slowtwitchers privately about ways to unlock the older age group market as well. I won a local race over the weekend in Virginia with roughly 500 competitors, and the biggest age group by far was Male 40-44. I can't imagine that a high percentage of them are on Instagram, yet they were very interested in what gear I was using, training, etc. As Monty mentioned above, I think it could be valuable for pros to do a couple of "local" races a year just for sponsorship purposes, where they can be the center of attention, connect with fans, etc. I'm not sure there's another way to reach that 50% of the current triathlon market that isn't on the social media feeds.

The Gram: @agyenis
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [poguer] [ In reply to ]
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Yeah, and that's not counting what he's going to make on Twitch this year (which is really hard to predict since that depends on the number of times/length of his streams, which have been down this year just because of long practice hours).

Do I think eSports and triathlon are a completely separate market? Yes. But I think there are still lessons to be learned from how the industry was able to grow so fast, most importantly from better engagement and donations from the community. All of the eSports stars have their own "brand" and personality, and when fans watch them stream they feel like they are part of their community. Is "streaming" triathlon as entertaining as playing a video game? Probably not. But I think pros can still leverage more connection/engagement with the triathlon community.

A side story: by coincidence I live down the street from Matt Centrowitz (Olympic gold medalist in the 1500m in Rio), and him and his dad have started their own local track team called District Track Club (http://districttrack.com/), and I've gotten the opportunity to run with them a couple of times. Aside from Matt who is fully funded by Nike, the other guys on the team don't have big sponsors. But from what I understand, the team is literally funded by a few wealthy guys who just love running and want to see guys stay in the sport and succeed coming out of college. Is that a sustainable model? Probably not. But it reminded me a lot of how people just make donations on Twitch for no reason aside from how much they enjoy the streamer, without asking for anything in return, and if there is a way to tap into that with people with some money who just want to see the sport of triathlon continue to grow.

The Gram: @agyenis
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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But from what I understand, the team is literally funded by a few wealthy guys who just love running and want to see guys stay in the sport and succeed coming out of college. //

This is actually a viable model for pros to pursue. It has been happening since 1982 when Jerry Domenelli poured in 100's of thousands into his personal triathlon team, then the DuPonts with Team Foxcatcher, and too many to number along the way to our Sheiks who are now pouring their money into teams and races. Hell, the very first prize list at Kona of a 100 grand was from just some guy that lived over there on vacations(actually a builder from San Diego) and he loved hanging with the pros. He would hold a lavish party for the pros before the race and hob knob, and then threw that 100k to Valerie in a way that she could not refuse it, back when there was not one nickel for pros at Kona..
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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I'm not even joking when I say that I'll bet with fair certainty that a 'normal' AGer like Triathlon Taren who has a strong online media presence and is targeted at AGers, will both be a lot more well known as well as a lot more of an effective product pitcher than nearly all the top pro winners at Kona save the #1 guy/gal there.

It's a different world out there - the money in triathlon isn't in the prize purse, and the name recognition isn't on the podium list outside of the tippy top competitors in the world (and even they drop off the moment they're not #1.) It's in building virtual relationships with large groups of people, similarly as many professional youtubers have done.

I know, sounds totally phony and lame to us oldsters who grew up in the era where there was no social media, and the way to money and fame was to be the world champion and that was that. But it's reality now, and for all its minuses, it does bring a lot more opportunities for creative and enterprising folks to make it a career even if they're not remotely world champion.
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [agyenis] [ In reply to ]
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Are you saying that model for USAT should be different? I get what you mean, the athlete commits to a race and something happens... no money. How is this different than
a long course athlete doing a 70.3 or Ironman who gets a mechanical that puts them out of the money?

If you've followed ITU and US athletes long enough, USAT recently changed this policy for reimbursement and personally, i think its a very good policy. Athletes who are being funded by USAT (some national team status) should have pressure placed on them to deliver results, its what makes them good. USAT gets funding from IOC, and when results dont come in, IOC doesnt give USAT money. We have seen athletes in the past abuse this who would constantly drop out of races and USAT pays the bill?

If the athlete is younger and racing for a 40th place... IMO they shouldn't be at WTS races. Thats just poor development. Racing up too quickly is the best way to break and bankrupt athletes.




agyenis wrote:


I don't want to turn this into an ITU vs. long-course debate and how there is a lot more money in long-course racing, etc.; I am well aware of that, but with the WTS getting an NBC deal and the Olympic cycle kicking into full gear, I'm still convinced that there are ways to unlock more value for ITU racers. Guys like Ben Kanute have had to add 70.3s into their annual schedule, both because they can get a lot more prize money but sponsors also prefer seeing their product at the front of those longer races with big age group fields. I think it's also very dangerous how USAT does a reimbursement policy for ITU races as opposed to covering costs upfront; currently you have to get top 15 at a WTS race to get reimbursed by USAT, and that creates a tremendous amount of pressure on young athletes who are already struggling to get by. You had a mechanical incident on the bike in Yokohama? Well, guess you won't get reimbursed for that $2,000 flight/hotel/meal combo. But I think that's a separate discussion.

Inside The Big Ring Podcast, Interviews with Ironman Champions, Kona Qualifiers, and Training Tips


Last edited by: Brandes: May 17, 18 8:19
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Re: Hypothetically, if I were to become an agent for pro triathletes, what value propositions for sponsors should I focus on? [monty] [ In reply to ]
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monty wrote:
But from what I understand, the team is literally funded by a few wealthy guys who just love running and want to see guys stay in the sport and succeed coming out of college. //

This is actually a viable model for pros to pursue. It has been happening since 1982 ...

I agree and as you point out there is a long history of this...
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