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Can’t change a tire, ready to quit
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I am so frustrated at being unable to change a tire it is making me consider giving up cycling. Has anyone else felt this kind of frustration while trying to change a tire? I must not be alone in struggling with getting a tire on and off. I have tried watching endless YouTube videos and nothing seems to help.

Any suggestions? I really don’t want to give up cycling, especially since I can no longer run and suck at swimming.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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What brand and model are your wheels?

What brand and model are your tires?
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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It can be frustrating. I'd recommend the Crank brother's speedier tire lever someone here recommended. Certainly in terms of putting on the tire it might just solve that by itself.

Are you following the tip about getting the tire bead in the wheel centre channel?

Some combinations of wheels and tires and just far tighter than others. Maybe someone here has a tire suggestion if you let us know what wheels you have or maybe get to your LBS and see if they have any suggestions. You may be just getting frustrated with an extremely tight combination.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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LBS's aren't always the most welcoming...but I would urge you to find the one you like the best, go in, ask them... offer to pay someone to teach you. Seriously. Have them show you step by step. In my opinion - would be well worth it.

Trust me, once you figure it out, it won't be so intimidating.

Best of luck. Don't give up riding!
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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some tires easy to change than others. depend if they have wirebead, kevlar, etc. how about just never dealing with having to change a tire? I use these.

https://tannusamerica.com/pages/tannus-airless-tires



http://www.coupleofathletes.com
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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What do you have?

What do you have difficulty with?

Some tires are easier to remove and pop back on than others. Some wheels are slightly larger and all tires are more difficult to put on them. Combine the two, tight tire and a difficult wheel, and it can be very hard to remove and replace a tire. If your problem is something else then ask someone to help and practice practice practice.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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My advice is to never get a flat.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Pieman wrote:
I am so frustrated at being unable to change a tire it is making me consider giving up cycling. Has anyone else felt this kind of frustration while trying to change a tire? I must not be alone in struggling with getting a tire on and off. I have tried watching endless YouTube videos and nothing seems to help.

Any suggestions? I really don’t want to give up cycling, especially since I can no longer run and suck at swimming.

First off - what kind of tire and how old is it? I'm quite proficient at changing tires but there are some old stiff tires that I've literally found impossible to remove (friends' old bikes).
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [lightheir] [ In reply to ]
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Brand new Continental Grand Prix 5000, on stock wheels that came with my Tarmac.

I literally tried for an hour and gave up before I threw my bike in the river lol.

I guy who is a mobile bike mechanic is coming to my house tomorrow to help me. That is embarrassing but unfortunately necessary.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Pieman wrote:
Brand new Continental Grand Prix 5000, on stock wheels that came with my Tarmac.

I literally tried for an hour and gave up before I threw my bike in the river lol.

I guy who is a mobile bike mechanic is coming to my house tomorrow to help me. That is embarrassing but unfortunately necessary.


Ouch - that really 'should' be readily changeable. Most folks here use GP5000s and they're not particularly difficult even when new and unstretched.

You likely have tried every 'normal' trick, but just in case, take advantage of using several tire levers to unseat the tire. Pull off the bead in one area, leave the lever in there, and use another to keep on moving around the rim.

Also, be sure you're not unseating part of one side and then working on unseating the opposite side. That will create too much stretching to work with. Make sure the tire side opposite the one you are removing is FULLY seated (you may have worked part of it out accidentally and then switched sides, not realizing it. This has happened to me on the road.)

The unfortunate part is that the tire REMOVAL is usually the (far) easier part of it. MOUNTING the tire is when the real trouble begins! =(

But good on you to have the bike guy coming over. He'll give you all you need to know - whether you just had an unfortunately hard tire combo, or if you were overlooking something. After that you can practice the heck out of it. Don't worry - you'll get it for sure.
Last edited by: lightheir: May 1, 21 16:16
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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tubeless or YouTube and a tire lever
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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I have small hands and have the same tires as you,and struggled for several years. I use a thing called a speed lever...there's also one called a speedier lever. It was a game changer for me, and now I swear by it! Maybe give it a try. I had a double flat in a race a few years ago due to some crazy potholes on a downhill, and was able to change both and get back in the race. Don't give up!!!!
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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I can install GP5000 clincher tires on Reynolds wheels with my hands.

I can remove it with two levers in about 10 seconds.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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It really just takes practice. When I first learned it took me well over an hour to change a tire. Fortunately the first couple times I had to do it I was in the comfort of my own home and not out on the road. Now it usually just takes a few minutes. Although it does depend on the tire. This winter I bought a pair of schwalbe marathon plus studded tires — now those are a tight fit! Took me an entire evening to get them on, especially the first one. Second one seemed to go better once I’d built some confidence. By the end, I’d broken a tire lever, and ended up with bloody hands from trying to grab the studded tire to roll it onto the rim!
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Pieman wrote:
Brand new Continental Grand Prix 5000, on stock wheels that came with my Tarmac.

I literally tried for an hour and gave up before I threw my bike in the river lol.

I guy who is a mobile bike mechanic is coming to my house tomorrow to help me. That is embarrassing but unfortunately necessary.

Check that the 5000 is clincher and not TL (tubeless)

Maurice
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [jimatbeyond] [ In reply to ]
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I can install GP 5000 clinchers, while battling a wolverine and pleasuring a half dozen women with my left hand. Which leaves my right hand available for. Never mind. But I can do it in ten seconds.

http://www.fitspeek.com the Fraser Valley's fitness, wellness, and endurance sports podcast
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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1. Make sure you have decent tire levers. If not, the mobile shop can sell you some for a couple bucks.

2. When the mobile bike shop guy comes, have him walk you through the process.

3. If you have a spare wheel/rim, practice taking the tire on and off. This allows you to master that part of the process without worrying about pinching the tube.

ECMGN Therapy Silicon Valley:
Depression, Neurocognitive problems, Dementias (Testing and Evaluation), Trauma and PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [OddSlug] [ In reply to ]
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OddSlug wrote:
(...)
Are you following the tip about getting the tire bead in the wheel centre channel?
(...)

This is absolutely key.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [pwai] [ In reply to ]
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pwai wrote:
OddSlug wrote:

(...)
Are you following the tip about getting the tire bead in the wheel centre channel?
(...)


This is absolutely key.

First learning about this was life changing. I went from breaking levers to using my hands overnight!
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [BigBoyND] [ In reply to ]
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Lots of good advice. One of the biggest things is a new tire seems harder than a used tire, if u can unpack it. Get it mostly on a rim then just leave it in a warmish place overnight or for a few hours. u might find coming back that it is noticeably easier.

There is a knack to it. I did what u are planning to do bought 2 tires 2 inner tubes and sat in the shop in a corner put on take off put on take off. Not watching. Doing with some advice. Won't say its super easy as finger strength matters and I'm a pianist fingers guy not a wingchun fingers of fury guy but the tricks outlined plus patience plus some advice will get u there.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Is it the on or off part that is messing with you?

Off= use levers, 3. Remember you don't ever need to take the whole tire off only one side and then you can pull out the inner tube.

For on: one thing that always tricked is that you run out of wheel, both Hands on the opposite side of where it is not on and massage/wiggle it towards you.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [pwai] [ In reply to ]
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How do I ensure that the bead is in the center of the rim? I tried pushing it toward the center from opposite sides, and it still would not give me enough slack.

I have the speedier tire lever and the kool stop tool, based on what people recommended here last year, and still can’t get it.

I will practice for an hour after the mechanic walks me through it.
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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Pieman wrote:
How do I ensure that the bead is in the center of the rim? I tried pushing it toward the center from opposite sides, and it still would not give me enough slack.

I have the speedier tire lever and the kool stop tool, based on what people recommended here last year, and still can’t get it.

I will practice for an hour after the mechanic walks me through it.

Stand the wheel in front of you such that you can look straight down on it. Grasp the tire at 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock with thumbs away from you and pointing towards the floor. Squeeze the tire in each hand between fingers and thumb so that the two beads come together in the center of the rim. While holding the tire in each hand, slide each hand towards 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock (don't lose tension) in a way that you are pulling each side of the tire in those directions. Repeat until at 7 o'clock and 5 o'clock. You will then have pulled each half of the tire toward the bottom (6 o'clock), and you'll have more slack. Pull tire onto rim as much as you can; repeat as necessary.

No tools needed.

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Re: Can’t change a tire, ready to quit [Pieman] [ In reply to ]
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Have you tried throwing your bicycle as far as you can? I got about 20 ft. out of a pretty heavy mountain bike after some tire-changing issues, and it worked for me. I figure the adrenaline gave me some extra strength and focus. (Ah, I see the river comment -- commit to this impulse.)

Can I suggest changing other tires? That is, a kid's bike, an old beater, etc. Some experience finishing the job will most likely open your eyes to tricks or approaches that you could apply to a much more difficult tire and rim setup. (This is 'the knack' someone upthread mentioned.) I also suggest watching the mechanic who does change your tire, and maybe asking them to undo it and let you redo it.

BTW donuts and six-packs are good ways to sidestep any bike mechanic embarrassment issues.
Last edited by: apmoss: May 2, 21 5:03
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