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$134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa.
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RAPPSTAR'S 2ND ANNUAL IRONMAN ARIZONA WORLD BICYCLE RELIEF CHARITY CHALLENGE http://www.slowtwitch.com/Features/Rappstar_s_2nd_Annual_Ironman_Arizona_World_Bicycle_Relief_Charity_Challenge_1760.html

$134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. We're trying to send 200 of them. What's in it for you? Some pretty sweet prizes from SRAM, Zipp, and more... 10.21.10
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Or, you can get one at Walmart for $59.
http://www.walmart.com/...4&ci_sku=2233451

What am I missing?
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [TriN2XL] [ In reply to ]
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I believe i read something about also having mechanics to service the bikes, and of course there is the shipping and just getting them to these remote villages. I know it costs me almost $200 just to get my bike to Hawaii, one way....
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [TriN2XL] [ In reply to ]
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In Reply To:
What am I missing?

A WalMart bike will fall apart pretty quickly, and the recipient will not have access to replacement parts.

These bikes are purpose built for the harsh environment and unusual rigor of their required use. Also, part of the money is earmarked for training local bicycle mechanics who will be able to service the fleet and keep them rolling.

Drop-shipping a cheap bike (that won't likely last long) into a needy community is one thing. WBR has designed a well thought out program that will empower the local community to play a pivotal role in their ongoing success through education and infrastructure.

A more suitable comparison would be Craig Calfee's bamboo bike project - where he and his team teach the locals how to build and maintain the bikes themselves, out of locally sources materials.


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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [TriN2XL] [ In reply to ]
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Not sure what bike you ride, but you can also get one at Walmart.
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [TriN2XL] [ In reply to ]
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eheeem....cough cough....

Douche bag.


What the hell does the cost of a WalMart bike have to do with anything? Could I find a bike for less? Possibly...could I find a bike for less in AFRICA? Not sure.


But your post was enough for me to pay another $134 for another bike.

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What if the Hokey Pokey is what it is all about?
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [TriN2XL] [ In reply to ]
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In Reply To:
RAPPSTAR'S 2ND ANNUAL IRONMAN ARIZONA WORLD BICYCLE RELIEF CHARITY CHALLENGE http://www.slowtwitch.com/Features/Rappstar_s_2nd_Annual_Ironman_Arizona_World_Bicycle_Relief_Charity_Challenge_1760.html

$134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. We're trying to send 200 of them. What's in it for you? Some pretty sweet prizes from SRAM, Zipp, and more... 10.21.10
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Or, you can get one at Walmart for $59.
http://www.walmart.com/...4&ci_sku=2233451

What am I missing?

The utilitarian nature of the bikes sent over there. The tires need to be built to handle riding across surfaces that - at BEST - could only loosely be described as "roads." They are extremely durable 4-ply (IIRC) tires that are designed to last a substantial number of miles, are maximally flat resistant, and are designed to be a good blend of grip and rolling.

The bikes also come with heavy duty tubes and a heavy duty carrying rack. The bikes can be loaded up with several HUNDRED pounds of fruit, supplies, etc. In many cases, the bikes are not actually ridden. They just get loaded up with TONS of stuff and then pushed, like a cart. That's great especially for shorter distances, where simply carrying a LOT of stuff is more important than going fast. But of course, for aid workers, it's important carry stuff and cover mileage, so they use the bikes a bit more traditionally.

The really simple answer is that $59 Walmart POS would last about 20minutes - max - under the kind of load these bikes get subjected to. And then it would be junk. And it would actually be worse than junk because there'd be no way to fix the excessively complicated - but useless - deraileurs and shocks.

"Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [Rappstar] [ In reply to ]
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Some more details, from the WBR site...

Financial Requirements
Through close partnerships with our suppliers, we were able to hold back any bicycle cost increases for two years. Unfortunately, in the face of rising costs across the board, the price for our bicycles increased from $109 per bike delivered into the field, to a new price of $134, as of July 15, 2008.

Our primary suppliers (Tata Industries India, Velosteel Czech Republic and Tata Zambia Ltd.) did a great job in holding prices in the face of increasing steel costs, a declining U.S. dollar (USD), and increases in transport costs. Our initial contract that brought our heavy-duty bikes into the field for $109 was negotiated in September 2006. Since that time, major changes occurred that directly affected our costs:

Cost of steel: increase by 78%. The robust nature of these bicycles means we use a lot of steel.
Cost of oil: increase by 101%. This affects every level of transportation, from rail, to sea freight, to trucking – but not transport by bicycle!
Dollar to Rupee: USD decreased by 8%. We purchase a high percentage of our parts out of India.
Dollar to Euro: USD decreased by 18%. We purchase rear hubs and air pumps from the Czech Republic and Germany.
Dollar to Zambian Kwacha: USD decreased by 20%. As you might expect, a significant part of our operating expenses occurs in Zambia.
We worked closely with our supplier base to keep the increase as low as possible while still maintaining the level of quality, robustness and performance that our program demands. All-in, the new cost of a bike – fully assembled and delivered into the field – is $134.00 a 23% increase. This price also includes a portion designated for the Field Mechanics Maintenance and Training program, independent Measuring and Evaluation and field management.

As always, we strive to manage costs where possible without compromising on our commitment to quality. We thank our suppliers for working closely with us to mitigate these cost increases, and in giving us early warning of this inevitability.

Our donors can be assured that we continue working to maximize the impact of each of their dollars contributed to World Bicycle Relief. This price increase is unfortunate, but our supplier base is committed, and the programs are strengthening every day. The Power of Bicycles is empowering people in a way that is sustainable and scaleable, and will have a lasting impact on their lives.

"Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [Rappstar] [ In reply to ]
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More on the bike

his simple, rugged bicycle is tougher than ever – perfect for the harsh riding conditions typically found in rural Africa. Available in men's, women's, and children's styles, it features a heavy-guaged, lugged frame; a rugged, single-speed drivetrain; heavy-duty cranks and chains; automotive-grade, puncture-resistant long-wear tires; heavy-duty rims, and more – all in a culturally appropriate design.

For more details and complete specs:
Download PDF >> http://worldbicyclerelief.org/...uty_0409_handout.pdf

"Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift
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Re: $134 buys a bicycle for a child in Africa. [Rappstar] [ In reply to ]
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Just read this page: http://worldbicyclerelief.org/about_us/impact.php

"Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift
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