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"Base training" for new cyclists?
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What kind of a pace should I be going at when putting in those first 500-1000 miles before really hammering intervals? I've been training with HR as I don't have the dough for a PM, and have been putting in a number of 42 mile rides at maybe 90-92% of max perceived effort.

I've seen my average speed during these rides increase significantly over the last 3 or so weeks (the extent of my training), from ~20.3 MPH on the first one, to 21.9 MPH yesterday (time includes a 2-minute nutrition break each time), at similar heart rates, though part of that is just increased handling abilities (the course has a ton of switchbacks over about 12 of those miles, and I'm also finally learning how to gear shift correctly).

I'm also seeing an increased ability to run off of the bike, and generally not physically bonk for the rest of the day, though that is still more of a problem than I would like it to be.

Am I doing things right? How much longer should I consistently get miles at an aggressive-but-not-suicidal pace in before looking to actually refine a plan? Every time I've asked this before, people have just said "get out and ride", but now that I'm doing that, when should I look to make things more specific?
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Re: "Base training" for new cyclists? [Quantum] [ In reply to ]
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are you training for anything specific? if not then just ride for a few months,

take a look at the book base building for cyclists




who's smarter than you're? i'm!
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Re: "Base training" for new cyclists? [Quantum] [ In reply to ]
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If you are enjoying what you are doing keep going.

One of the basic ways in which you can start to add variety into your week is look at 3 general workouts that a lot of endurance athletes complete every week.

1. One "long" session where the pace is comfortable and able to maintained.
2. One "hardish" session where the "efforts" total about an hour and are roughly at the intensity you could maintain if tested over the duration of an hour. Something like 2 x 30 minutes, 3 x 20 minutes, 4 x 15 minutes, 45 to 50 minutes straight or even just do a 1 hour (or 30 to 40km) time trial - they are great workouts.
3. One "hard" session, where the "efforts" are above what you could maintain for an hour. Basically as hard as you can maintain so that each effort is at the same intensity as the previous or a little harder. You don't want to be going too hard on the early repeats and falling apart (although this is not bad sometimes, smash yourself and see how long you can hang tough). So something like 4 to 10 repeats totally around 20 to 30 minutes at most. 5 x 4 minutes, 10 x 3 minutes or something like that. Recoveries between efforts are not really complete, but enough so that you can ramp it up again and punch out another effort - so a minute or two. Sometimes people use a hill and do repeats of a hill.
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