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Newbie Bike Question
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Does anyone have any suggestions for increasing revolutions per minute on bike? I read that it should be 90-100 rpm. I ride at 60 rpm. I am having a hard time getting up to 90, not fatigue or anything, just getting the feet around that fast. Thanks for the help.
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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I would suggest getting on the trainer/stationary bike and try to spin at 90-100 rpm in an easy gear. Feel what it is like. Then gradually increase the resistance/shift to harder gears and try to maintain 90-100 rpm. Slowly build over time. Just a thought.

Heather Sweet
http://thesweetsadventure.blogspot.com/
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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I'm working on increasing my cadence in a spin class and I do "spin ups" multiple times during the session. I'm aiming for really high cadence for the track. Pick an easy gear and spin up to where you want and then hold it as long as you can. Repeat. Eventually, you'll automatically go to the higher cadence. But like the other poster said, you need to move to an easier gear. If you are only at 60 rpm, then you are probably in way too big of a gear.

clm

clm
Nashville, TN
https://twitter.com/ironclm | http://ironclm.typepad.com
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [hj-rockstar] [ In reply to ]
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That would be my suggestion too. Spin at a very easy gear.

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Jen - @ultragrrl

"In order to keep a true perspective on one's importance, everyone should have a dog that worships him and a cat that will ignore him." - Dereke Bruce
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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+1 on the spin-ups exercise. I like to do 1 minute of an increase of 10 rpms, and then another, etc. So if you are starting with 60 you'd do a minute at 70, a minute at 80, a minute at 90 and then a minute back down at 60. Do as many reps as you can hold those rpms. Something else to try is gear down a few notches, you may just be pushing too hard a gear for a high cadence.

Good luck!

M

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The beatings will continue until morale improves

My blog
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [mdraegernyc] [ In reply to ]
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+2 on the spinups. We used to do t hem where you'd try to see how high you ould get--some peeps were INSANE. I would bounce out of my saddle at about 115, but it really is helpful.


mmm-mmm-Momo Charms
Handmade beverage charms, jewelry, and miscellanea

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Re: Newbie Bike Question [mmrocker13] [ In reply to ]
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In Reply To:
+2 on the spinups. We used to do t hem where you'd try to see how high you ould get--some peeps were INSANE. I would bounce out of my saddle at about 115, but it really is helpful.

I'm to 162 as a max. I can hit 140 pretty regularly, but can only hold it about 15 seconds (which is all I need in a 200M).

clm

clm
Nashville, TN
https://twitter.com/ironclm | http://ironclm.typepad.com
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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Everybody has a cadence range at which they are most comfortable. Some people are comfortable in the low ranges, like 60, while others are more comfortable in the 90s.

Most people on here, I would guess, have a cadence in the 80s when racing hard.

I would guess your issue is more neuro-muscular than physical, in that you have to "teach" your muscles to fire at the required frequency for high cadence pedalling.
Spin-ups or rev-outs, as others have suggested, are a great way to practise getting used to high rpms. A trainer may be good for this as your upper body movement may cause the bike to twitch beneath you.

Could also try seated downhill accelerations in a small gear, concentrating on getting the gear moving, or get a fixed gear, with a lowish gear on it. This will make you pedal faster, as you have no choice really.



"Here's how you run a marathon. Step 1: You start running. Step 2: There is no step 2." - Barney (How I Met Your Mother)
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [trackie clm] [ In reply to ]
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I think I maxed out somewhere near 140 once. :p I'm just a big, dumb gear masher...even on the track. I'm not a sprinter though...I'm the big, dumb domerstique who does the pulling for our sprinters :D


mmm-mmm-Momo Charms
Handmade beverage charms, jewelry, and miscellanea

http://momocharms.wordpress.com
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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Another point to rev-ups is that, while they get you comfortable at getting to that RPM, you have to then get comfortable with maintaining it. Shift to a gear that feels fairly easy then spin it up to where you start to spin out. Hold that. Don't shift to make it harder, learn to spin your legs at the higher rate to keep the pedals engaged. It's not about constant acceleration, you'll be able to hold the higher cadence for longer as you learn to apply even, steady power at the higher cadence which will transfer into spinning faster over a longer period of time.

The tracksters get fantastic experience at this as they have to learn to spin that one gear higher to go faster. We learned the same concept in college at IU (Little 5). Learn to spin fast in a little gear, it'll transfer into being able to spin higher gears longer (faster mashing). Riding on your trainer will allow you to know what that cadence feels like to your legs. Riding it on rollers and on the road will allow you to learn the bike-handling skills to accompany that higher cadence without bouncing yourself off the bike.

Does anyone know of any articles or studies and whatnot around that demonstrate the benefits of spinning vs mashing and the muscle savings for the run?

AW
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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After reading this thread, I practiced Sunday afternoon for 3 hours at high cadence (90-120) on a spin bike.

My nearly 50 year-old knees hurt for the first time.

Normal consequence of more r.p.m.'s, sign that my seat is too low (ST first!), or something else?

DFL > DNF > DNS
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [SallyShortyPnts] [ In reply to ]
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>>or something else?<<

>>3 hours at high cadence<<

I think your answer is right there.......

Work into it!

clm
Nashville, TN
https://twitter.com/ironclm | http://ironclm.typepad.com
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [trackie clm] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks!

Just who I hoped would see my post.

I love Slowtwitch.

DFL > DNF > DNS
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Re: Newbie Bike Question [pookie87] [ In reply to ]
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I would agree - bike fit!! Seat height....and ease into it. Also, try rotor rings, smaller crank arms. I used to mash and had 170's. I was a triathlete and turned cyclist and the first thing to bring up my cadence was to get 167.5 (I am 5'5). I also used my small chain ring much more -39 and focused on spinning, put a 12-27 cassette on and SPUN SPUN SPUN!

You gotta work on it and yet, it works your quads and muscles around the knees! Keep it up, bc it helps on the hills and climbing and in the long run your riding!
Anna
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