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ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation.
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 It took a few years but there you go...
Jimmy- “Without question our data tells us our fans do not want us to cover politics.”

Tell us Jimmy why the flip? Was it...

"You needed to convene something to do a tabulation that deliver some data?
Was it the 15 million lost subscribers? Was that the “data?”
How about the endless complaints across social media, the editorials…?
Maybe the layoffs? Those massive layoffs — were the layoffs the data, Jimmy?
Perhaps it was the ratings crash?
Consumer sentiment?

What ESPN preached 2017:
"So many of you write in every time we say something that you disagree with politically, even though we don’t talk politics around here. We talk race, we talk about cultural issues — we don’t talk politics. So many of you write in, ‘That’s why ESPN is losing subscribers, because of its liberal leanings.’ It’s just a basic misunderstanding of what is happening with ESPN that confirms to your biases. That is not why ESPN is losing subscribers at all. ESPN is losing subscribers because in 2017, all of the technology has changed and 99 million of you have been paying for something that 98 million of you may not be using at any given time. It’s not about the politics of the company. The company doesn’t have politics."

https://www.breitbart.com/...s-to-cover-politics/
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [getcereal] [ In reply to ]
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getcereal wrote:
“Without question our data tells us our fans do not want us to cover politics.”

Fucking sky is blue and grass is green
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [getcereal] [ In reply to ]
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Good read. If they could also get rid of the crime blogger that would be nice of just keep it on espn news.

There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.
~ John Adams, Letter to Jonathan Jackson (October 2, 1780).
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [getcereal] [ In reply to ]
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ESPN has other problems too. Obviously their political BS is a major issue, but their "talent" are a bunch of self-absorbed, self-impressed hacks. They aren't comedians, even though they think they are. I watch live sports on that channel, and that's it. And I used to really enjoy ESPN, now I can't get through SC, college game day, any of it. I remember Dan Patrick and Keith Olbermann (love him or hate him) and their show was good. It was unique, they are both incredibly intelligent and knowledgeable, and it was the only crew like it on the channel. Then everyone tried to follow suit, and it has shown to be an abject failure.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [ripple] [ In reply to ]
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but their "talent" are a bunch of self-absorbed, self-impressed hacks. They aren't comedians, even though they think they are.

I've been trying to articulate why I don't like watching sports the majority of the time. Most announcers fit the bill you described.

________
It doesn't really matter what Phil is saying, the music of his voice is the appropriate soundtrack for a bicycle race. HTupolev
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [getcereal] [ In reply to ]
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Remember when ESPN was also the place to watch sports other than the big four (NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL). Back in the 80's I learned more about popular sports in other countries than the last 30 years combined.

--------------------------
Runners Roost Race Team
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [mck414] [ In reply to ]
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I used to love ESPN. Watched a lot of weekend coverage, especially College Gameday.

It's funny, though. One day a couple of years ago something just clicked in my brain, and all of a sudden the seriousness with which they talk about football, sports business, etc. just seemed ridiculous because none of it really matters. I was watching College Gameday, and I was like, "Why am I even paying attention to this?"

Turned it off and haven't watched anything on ESPN since except a little live coverage of something here or there. The opinion, analyst, etc. stuff just seems like a total waste of time.

This isn't meant to be judgement on sports fans at all. But I do wonder if after some 10 years of wall-to-wall TV, online, radio, podcast, and YouTube content 24/7 people are just hitting max capacity and walking away from it all. Content producers (and I say this as someone working in content marketing) are always looking to produce more content, faster, and distribute it through more channels. But at some point people are just going to hit overload. I think that's natural.
Last edited by: CloversDad: May 22, 19 10:27
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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Just curious as to your age. Because I did this years ago as well. When I had my first kid (and time became a premium) sports was the first thing to go (wife didn’t watch).

When my kids got older. I started back up again. When they left the house it went back down.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [H-] [ In reply to ]
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H- wrote:
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but their "talent" are a bunch of self-absorbed, self-impressed hacks. They aren't comedians, even though they think they are.

I've been trying to articulate why I don't like watching sports the majority of the time. Most announcers fit the bill you described.

Drives me positively batty when they miss plays or make it a tiny PIP, so they can cut away to the announcers chatting about some random subject.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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CloversDad wrote:
I used to love ESPN. Watched a lot of weekend coverage, especially College Gameday.

It's funny, though. One day a couple of years ago something just clicked in my brain, and all of a sudden the seriousness with which they talk about football, sports business, etc. just seemed ridiculous because none of it really matters. I was watching College Gameday, and I was like, "Why am I even paying attention to this?"

Turned it off and haven't watched anything on ESPN since except a little live coverage of something here or there. The opinion, analyst, etc. stuff just seems like a total waste of time.

This isn't meant to be judgement on sports fans at all. But I do wonder if after some 10 years of wall-to-wall TV, online, radio, podcast, and YouTube content 24/7 people are just hitting max capacity and walking away from it all. Content producers (and I say this as someone working in content marketing) are always looking to produce more content, faster, and distribute it through more channels. But at some point people are just going to hit overload. I think that's natural.

I still watch a lot of sports. But I cannot watch the pre/post/preview/recap shows. The predictions as if they are stating fact, talk as if the game is impacting society, golf portrayed as a brave act. etc. It really is silly.

I've never understood people who stay mad for days after 'their' team loses. No matter how much I like watching a team, win or lose I still have to go to work on Monday.

We are so fucked.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [patentattorney] [ In reply to ]
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patentattorney wrote:
Just curious as to your age. Because I did this years ago as well. When I had my first kid (and time became a premium) sports was the first thing to go (wife didn’t watch).

I'm 35 now, but this happened at the beginning of the second football season after she was born. She was a solid sleeper from the start, and I really enjoyed Saturday mornings with her watching Gameday and then the games while her mom was at work. She'd hang out and play on the floor or sleep on the couch or in her swing. I could even get my trainer ride done during that time.

Sometimes I'd take her out to a restaurant on the water to watch games (we lived in Florida). But by the time second season came around, she was over a year old and very mobile. It was a lot more fun to go do something--and when the wife started getting weekends off, too, we had much better things to do than watch TV all morning.

But my life perspective changed a lot and I found myself more driven to pursue meaningful activities--like connecting with the outdoors, exposing her to new experiences, and focusing on work, conservation, or other "better-life" stuff. That's when sports just took a back seat.

I still love endurance sports coverage, but I find a lot of that stuff interesting for motivation.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [j p o] [ In reply to ]
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j p o wrote:
CloversDad wrote:
I used to love ESPN. Watched a lot of weekend coverage, especially College Gameday.

It's funny, though. One day a couple of years ago something just clicked in my brain, and all of a sudden the seriousness with which they talk about football, sports business, etc. just seemed ridiculous because none of it really matters. I was watching College Gameday, and I was like, "Why am I even paying attention to this?"

Turned it off and haven't watched anything on ESPN since except a little live coverage of something here or there. The opinion, analyst, etc. stuff just seems like a total waste of time.

This isn't meant to be judgement on sports fans at all. But I do wonder if after some 10 years of wall-to-wall TV, online, radio, podcast, and YouTube content 24/7 people are just hitting max capacity and walking away from it all. Content producers (and I say this as someone working in content marketing) are always looking to produce more content, faster, and distribute it through more channels. But at some point people are just going to hit overload. I think that's natural.


I still watch a lot of sports. But I cannot watch the pre/post/preview/recap shows. The predictions as if they are stating fact, talk as if the game is impacting society, golf portrayed as a brave act. etc. It really is silly.

I've never understood people who stay mad for days after 'their' team loses. No matter how much I like watching a team, win or lose I still have to go to work on Monday.


I am similar to you. Watch sports when I am home not doing anything and will follow some teams but have no vested interest. If a team I like wins, that is interesting but I had nothing to do with it. If they lose, OK, when is the next game. Don't understand people that live for it.

ESPN was great in the 80s and 90s when they had some obscure sports on that you would not normally see or maybe a documentary on a great player. The talking head shows are a waste of time.

Have always told my kids life is not a spectator sport so no reason to get so involved in watching other people do something. Go out and do something yourself and be active. Sitting on you butt in the stands when you don't any of the players personally is not my idea of a good time spent.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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I've gradually have come around to your position. I have to chuckle when these announcers and sportswriters "god up" the athletes. Calling them heroic, brave, warriors etc. And then ESPN seems to think I'm interested in some wide receiver's view on social issues.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [getcereal] [ In reply to ]
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There are synergies between the motivations people are discussing here. I think many people in ESPN's primary demographic watched way too much meaningless sports coverage. Sometimes it takes clumsy political propaganda, spoon fed to you like you're an idiot, to help bring the idea home. (Not in all cases, but sometimes.)
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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Just an FYI. That was around what happened with me. Just the life perspective changing / responsibilities changed / lack of free time.

Not sure how old the kiddos are now, but when mine got to maybe middle school / high school they liked watching games. In elementary school they thought they were boring (except the big games).

So during that period we would go to game regularly with them, watch games at home for bonding, etc. Once they moved away, the sports died down again. It was never the same as it was during college/early adulthood.

edit: some of it I think also happened once I got older than the players. I still appreciate the athleticism of the players. But when I was younger I remember thinking that they cared about the sports. Once I got older than the players, I realized that a lot of them dont really care about the sport (just the lifestyle/money, not blaming them) , and also the most owners dont really care about the sport either (just a status symbol for wealthy guys).
Last edited by: patentattorney: May 22, 19 12:05
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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+1

I cannot seem to get into it any more. A lot of the same reason you state. How can it be that important?

My son made a mistake in high school playing basketball and it got some attention from some local writers in our area. The decision, they stated would be a life changer and he would haunt him and he would look back at it, blah, blah, blah. Anyway, my thought was, maybe, just maybe, he would not care about some game in high school when he is 40 and all the bullshit that was talked about around sports is just bullshit and kids will turn out just fine without it.

As a coach now myself, I just focus on personal responsibility, working hard, how you behave after a disappointment, etc.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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CloversDad wrote:
..The opinion, analyst, etc. stuff just seems like a total waste of time.
Agree completely. I don't know who the target demographic is for wall-to-wall pre-draft, draft, and post-draft coverage.. we're talking about a month of midless and largely inconsequential analysis of a game. Sounds like the jersey-wearing, beer guzzling, former HS star dude-bro crowd that can't even remember half of their teams' game on Sunday because they were either sloshed or passed out for most of it. Whatever floats your boat. I love football. I have no desire to analyze mock drafts and Mel's big board. It's like bracketology with Lunardi. People get genuinely incensed by these guys predictions.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [PrinceMax] [ In reply to ]
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PrinceMax wrote:
I've gradually have come around to your position. I have to chuckle when these announcers and sportswriters "god up" the athletes. Calling them heroic, brave, warriors etc. And then ESPN seems to think I'm interested in some wide receiver's view on social issues.

This has always bothered me. Just because you can catch a ball, act in a movie, etc. doesn't mean I give a rat's ass about your opinion on a social issue, the President, etc. The athletes aren't brave, heroic, or warriors. They are paid a substantial amount of money because they are skilled at a sport. I congratulate them on their ability and I watch sports because I want a diversion from life's B.S. Not their opinion.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
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Go Pound Sand wrote:
This has always bothered me. Just because you can catch a ball, act in a movie, etc. doesn't mean I give a rat's ass about your opinion on a social issue, the President, etc.

You can't fault a person for using their platform. Few people have the ability to reach more than a few thousand people.

You don't have to care about their opinion. But if it truly bothers you, ask why. Put your own convictions to the test a little. People are often uncomfortable with their views being challenged.

Maybe you say, "Just because they can throw a ball doesn't mean they know about _____." But is that really true? Does throwing a ball exclude one from all other life experience and knowledge? I think it's at least worth honestly considering a person's perspective/reality/knowledge.

Or just tune them out. But like I said, if their message keeps eating at you, maybe it's because they're unsettling your convictions.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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CloversDad wrote:
Go Pound Sand wrote:

This has always bothered me. Just because you can catch a ball, act in a movie, etc. doesn't mean I give a rat's ass about your opinion on a social issue, the President, etc.


You can't fault a person for using their platform. Few people have the ability to reach more than a few thousand people.

You don't have to care about their opinion. But if it truly bothers you, ask why. Put your own convictions to the test a little. People are often uncomfortable with their views being challenged.

Maybe you say, "Just because they can throw a ball doesn't mean they know about _____." But is that really true? Does throwing a ball exclude one from all other life experience and knowledge? I think it's at least worth honestly considering a person's perspective/reality/knowledge.

Or just tune them out. But like I said, if their message keeps eating at you, maybe it's because they're unsettling your convictions.


Yeah, and maybe the women that say they don't like their ass grabbed at work are really unsettled with how much it turns them on.
Last edited by: SH: May 22, 19 12:34
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [SH] [ In reply to ]
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SH wrote:
Yeah, and maybe the women that say they don't like their ass grabbed at work are really unsettled with how much it turns them on.

false equivalence
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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CloversDad wrote:
SH wrote:

Yeah, and maybe the women that say they don't like their ass grabbed at work are really unsettled with how much it turns them on.


false equivalence

Each case is an example of not trusting a person when they tell you how they feel.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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CloversDad wrote:
Go Pound Sand wrote:

This has always bothered me. Just because you can catch a ball, act in a movie, etc. doesn't mean I give a rat's ass about your opinion on a social issue, the President, etc.


You can't fault a person for using their platform. Few people have the ability to reach more than a few thousand people.

You don't have to care about their opinion. But if it truly bothers you, ask why. Put your own convictions to the test a little. People are often uncomfortable with their views being challenged.

Maybe you say, "Just because they can throw a ball doesn't mean they know about _____." But is that really true? Does throwing a ball exclude one from all other life experience and knowledge? I think it's at least worth honestly considering a person's perspective/reality/knowledge.

Or just tune them out. But like I said, if their message keeps eating at you, maybe it's because they're unsettling your convictions.

I don't think I'm uncomfortable with having my views challenged. I think what bothers me is the idea because of someone's fame, their perspective is somehow more important than the local plumber or school teacher.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [SH] [ In reply to ]
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SH wrote:

Each case is an example of not trusting a person when they tell you how they feel.

No. One is free speech. The other is physical assault.
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Re: ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro seems to have had a revelation. [CloversDad] [ In reply to ]
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CloversDad wrote:
SH wrote:

Each case is an example of not trusting a person when they tell you how they feel.

No. One is free speech. The other is physical assault.

Free speech doesn't mean what you think it does.
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