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a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner)
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ive been running in the hoka arahis as a daily runner for several years now. fantastic shoe for me, very comfy. for simplicities sake i run them for long run days as well as shorter interval days. i have zero knee and leg pain when i run in these outside the normal fatigue you get from long distance running.

at one point i tried to transition to the on running cloud ace (maybe two years ago) because... as much as i hate to say it, the arahis are typically very ugly shoes and on makes really aesthetically pleasing shoes. that didnt go so well as i was feeling muscle / knee pain that i didnt with the arahis. i quickly abandoned the on shoes.

fast forward to now and i hit the same delima. i went to order some new arahis and ill be damned if the new model isnt uglier than the last. i decided to try the cloud ace again, and as a stronger runner now than before i still an feeling the same "pains" as before, but not as much.

this begs the question, as a mid pack runner, is it better to stick with tried and true shoe that you KNOW you run well in, or does switching to a shoe that isnt as comfortable "stretch" you as a runner and help you develop more? im swapping now from the cloud ace and the cloud stratus. i am digging the ace more than the stratus as a daily, but i plan on forcing myself to give them both a very fair shake to make sure im not just relying on a comfy shoe (the hoka arahi) to carry me through when i could be developing more as a runner.

'21 Captex Tri / Lubbock 70.3 / IM Cozumel
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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Staying injury-free is one of the hardest things about running. If a shoe hurts, don’t wear it.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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I always wear what's comfortable, rather than wear something uncomfortable and hope to adapt.

What I find comfortable has changed over time however.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [gatorFL] [ In reply to ]
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gatorFL wrote:
Staying injury-free is one of the hardest things about running. If a shoe hurts, don’t wear it.

+1

The purpose of a running shoe is to allow you to remain uninjured (racing flats/spikes being the exception).

The best way to get faster as a runner is to stay healthy so you can continue training.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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damon.lebeouf wrote:
fast forward to now and i hit the same delima. i went to order some new arahis and ill be damned if the new model isnt uglier than the last. i decided to try the cloud ace again, and as a stronger runner now than before i still an feeling the same "pains" as before, but not as much.

If you are having pain by simply just changing running shoes, then I'd suggest not wearing the shoes that are giving you pain and stick with what has worked for you or keep searching for a shoe that works. There is a reason most running stores let you test shoes out before buying and may online retailers will allow you to return shoes after you've run in them. Running in shoes that give you pain is not going to make you a better runner, you'll delay your progress due to having to take days off.

Never buy running shoes based on looks either.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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There are perils with both and benefits with both.

Sticking to the same shoe.
Benefits
1. No stress - Shoe wears out you replace it.
2. Confidence going out the door
3. Running shoe budget in check
Perils
1. They will change the shoe to a point where it doesn’t feel right.
2. Finding a replacement will be really stressful
3. The budget will be blown.

Trying something new
Benefits
1. Running is repetitive. It’s a known fact if you want to be a stronger runner and less prone to injuries you need to run on different surfaces at different paces. A different shoe is a different surface.
2. When that Anahi gets changed you’ll still have a running shoe in the closet you can run in.
3. Yes, it will continue you path of making you a better runner. It will make you stronger.
Perils
1. You may start chasing shoes. Don’t do that. Set a plan and stick to it.
2. Don’t buy for looks. If you are going to do that there are plenty of shoes that look good.
3. Your budget will have to expand

Dave Jewell
Free Run Speed
Running Shoe Insight

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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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I hear you on the ugliness of hoka. They've changed my life since I started running with them - no more calf/achilles pain regardless of volume. But everytime I renew them I'm like "how can such a great pair of sneakers be so ugly". Not only I look like a spice girl when I run but i'm wearing PURPLE bondis right now... Gives me a reason to push harder when I see folks in Next% passing by.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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You're literally worried about the last 1%. Stop it, unless you're a 2:02 marathoner already.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [marklemcd] [ In reply to ]
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marklemcd wrote:
You're literally worried about the last 1%. Stop it, unless you're a 2:02 marathoner already.

I'll def disagree with this. Particularly if you have arthritis or some other limiter which can be exacerbated by the wrong shoes. I'm learning this the hard way with my ankle arthritis - the right shoes make a huge difference. If I use a true maxi-cushion (and unfortunately slow and blocky) shoe, I can run with little problem at my 30ish mpw volume, with speedwork. If I use even a 'high-normal' cushion shoe like Brooks Glycerin, I can only do 2/3 or 1/2 have that volume before my ankles are aching to the point you simply know it's a bad idea to continue.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [SDJ] [ In reply to ]
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SDJ wrote:
1. Running is repetitive. It’s a known fact if you want to be a stronger runner and less prone to injuries you need to run on different surfaces at different paces. A different shoe is a different surface.

That's the reason why I rotate my running shoes. I have many different pairs (different shapes, sizes, weight, drops, etc.. ). It's been working well for me.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [lightheir] [ In reply to ]
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lightheir wrote:
marklemcd wrote:
You're literally worried about the last 1%. Stop it, unless you're a 2:02 marathoner already.


I'll def disagree with this. Particularly if you have arthritis or some other limiter which can be exacerbated by the wrong shoes. I'm learning this the hard way with my ankle arthritis - the right shoes make a huge difference. If I use a true maxi-cushion (and unfortunately slow and blocky) shoe, I can run with little problem at my 30ish mpw volume, with speedwork. If I use even a 'high-normal' cushion shoe like Brooks Glycerin, I can only do 2/3 or 1/2 have that volume before my ankles are aching to the point you simply know it's a bad idea to continue.

The OP already said the current shoe is working well. So your what if isn't a what if. Literally, they have a shoe that works and think by wearing something else they'll be a better runner. This is lunacy, they just need to train.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [marklemcd] [ In reply to ]
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I find if I change shoes I have to slowly up the mileage on the new shoes. This was a really big deal back in the minimalist days and I imagine going from a Hoka to a normal shoe would present the same challenge.

For the record I now alternate between Hoka One/One and a pair of Altras just so I don't get to used to either type of shoe. I'm not back to IM or even 1/2 IM shape but it's working well for me.
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Re: a question on changing running shoes (comfort versus growth as a runner) [marklemcd] [ In reply to ]
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marklemcd wrote:
lightheir wrote:
marklemcd wrote:
You're literally worried about the last 1%. Stop it, unless you're a 2:02 marathoner already.


I'll def disagree with this. Particularly if you have arthritis or some other limiter which can be exacerbated by the wrong shoes. I'm learning this the hard way with my ankle arthritis - the right shoes make a huge difference. If I use a true maxi-cushion (and unfortunately slow and blocky) shoe, I can run with little problem at my 30ish mpw volume, with speedwork. If I use even a 'high-normal' cushion shoe like Brooks Glycerin, I can only do 2/3 or 1/2 have that volume before my ankles are aching to the point you simply know it's a bad idea to continue.


The OP already said the current shoe is working well. So your what if isn't a what if. Literally, they have a shoe that works and think by wearing something else they'll be a better runner. This is lunacy, they just need to train.

Yeah, my problem is more that shoe companies keep changing their shoe models and characteristics all the time, and whenever I find the perfect shoe it receives counter modifications (at best, but makes it less ideal than it was) or just discontinued (i.e. Altra The One 2.5, not as good in its 3.0 version, then altogether discontinued). I have the added problem of limited availability of suitable options in Australia (third world when it comes to having access to proper range of suitable running shoes).
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