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Everest for running?
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First of all, I know there is everesting for running already but to me, that seems to be a much higher level than everesting for cycling. I am wondering what thoughts are around running's equivalent. I mean equivalent by attainability, as it seems to me that many amateurs could realistically ride an everest with good training, but the same feat for running seems to me the world of pro/elite ultra runners (or just really, really dedicated amateurs).

I had thought of taking around 60% of the height, which is based on my rough target times for a 70.3 (2:30/1:30) but I feel like running deserves a discount due to the added stress of running downhill. Even then, I feel like I am still looking at 20+ hours of running at my pace whereas I feel like I could ride an everest at 14-15 hours. (fwiw, no interest in riding an everest, I decided early in the pandemic that I would focus on running this year)

Bonus question: What are your thoughts around an ideal grade for running an everest? I am not sure where the balance of being able to maintain a good pace upwards is upended by getting the legs hammered on the way down.

808 > NYC > PDX
2020 Races?: Nope.
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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IMO a "fair" running or hiking everesting attempt does not require you to make the descent on foot. E.g., set a treadmill to 15% grade and hike 36 miles. Or 4x Pikes peak ascent with hitchhike down. Or a lot of stair climbs in a tall office building with elevator rides down.

If you wanted to do the descents on foot, then I think a reasonable target would be to do the base camp - Everest elevation gain, so about 12,000 feet up and down. Optimum for speed on climbing is to go as steep as possible since you waste less energy on forward movement, optimum for downwards speed in terms of elevation loss is also quite steep. Take a look at the Mount Marathon race in Seward, Alaska. The course record is sub 42 minutes for climbing and descending 3000 feet in 5k of horizontal distance. I bet those top guys could do 12k up and down in 4-5 hours (consistent with the records for Pike's peak marathon).
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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Or, you know, just quit hedging and do the thing:

https://runningmagazine.ca/...n-everest-challenge/

__________________________________________________________
ill advised racing inc.
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Re: Everest for running? [twcronin] [ In reply to ]
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Everest elevation gain, so about 12,000 feet

Base camp is at slightly over 18,000'
Last edited by: michael Hatch: Aug 4, 20 14:32
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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Or maybe just accept that Everesting is easier on a bike than it is running. Much like it's taken for granted that either option is easier to do than it is with mountaineering.
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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Just find a mountain with snow and walk up and skid down.
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Re: Everest for running? [mistressk] [ In reply to ]
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mistressk wrote:
Or, you know, just quit hedging and do the thing:

https://runningmagazine.ca/...n-everest-challenge/

Damn, maybe I should repost this question in the "cry like a biatch" thread

808 > NYC > PDX
2020 Races?: Nope.
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Re: Everest for running? [fb] [ In reply to ]
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fb wrote:
Just find a mountain with snow and walk up and skid down.

my opinion of this is that one should run both ways, which is why I seek a discount. But I could also be seeking a discount because I'm a millennial.

808 > NYC > PDX
2020 Races?: Nope.
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Re: Everest for running? [michael Hatch] [ In reply to ]
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michael Hatch wrote:
Everest elevation gain, so about 12,000 feet

Base camp is at slightly over 18,000'

If so, you should edit Wikipedia, which says they're at 17.5k and 16.9k. To be clear, I meant that the "Everest" part of the attempt is the climb from base camp to summit, and not from sea level to base camp.
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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hadukla wrote:
fb wrote:
Just find a mountain with snow and walk up and skid down.


my opinion of this is that one should run both ways, which is why I seek a discount. But I could also be seeking a discount because I'm a millennial.


I mean skidding/sliding on your feet or rear, like people do in skyrunning. It's fun!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5BMJcr0ivI
Last edited by: fb: Aug 4, 20 15:47
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Re: Everest for running? [fb] [ In reply to ]
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fb wrote:
hadukla wrote:
fb wrote:
Just find a mountain with snow and walk up and skid down.


my opinion of this is that one should run both ways, which is why I seek a discount. But I could also be seeking a discount because I'm a millennial.


I mean skidding/sliding on your feet or rear, like people do in skyrunning. It's fun!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5BMJcr0ivI

Oooh I get it! That may be an option for a nice steep muddy hillside in the rainy PNW winters

808 > NYC > PDX
2020 Races?: Nope.
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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1) Find a tall building*
2) Run up the stairs from the bottom to the top
3) Take the elevator down
4) Repeat as necessary



* A parking garage would suffice, if it has an elevator

"Isn't RandMart the old punk rock dude who had the crazy ex? Then this post checks out"

Stop-Think-Consider-Do
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Re: Everest for running? [fb] [ In reply to ]
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fb wrote:

I mean skidding/sliding on your feet or rear, like people do in skyrunning. It's fun!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5BMJcr0ivI

The proper term for that technique is "glissade" - it's sketchy as heck (at least if you're as clumsy as I am), but definitely fun. There's a race that's held in late April at a private ski resort in Ontario (Pick Your Poison 12.5k/25k/50k) and the final descent through the finish line offers great glissade opportunity most years - you get to do it 4 times for the 50k.



__________________________________________________________
ill advised racing inc.
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Re: Everest for running? [RandMart] [ In reply to ]
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RandMart wrote:
1) Find a tall building*
2) Run up the stairs from the bottom to the top
3) Take the elevator down
4) Repeat as next



* A parking garage would suffice, if it has an elevator

Or 58,070 stairs on the stair stepper.

3,871 flights of stairs.

https://www.strava.com/...tes/zachary_mckinney
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Re: Everest for running? [plant_based] [ In reply to ]
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plant_based wrote:
RandMart wrote:
1) Find a tall building*
2) Run up the stairs from the bottom to the top
3) Take the elevator down
4) Repeat as next



* A parking garage would suffice, if it has an elevator


Or 58,070 stairs on the stair stepper.

3,871 flights of stairs.

I wanted to skip over the mechanical means like steppers, or jacking the incline on the treadmill to 20% or whatever the Max may be

"Isn't RandMart the old punk rock dude who had the crazy ex? Then this post checks out"

Stop-Think-Consider-Do
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Re: Everest for running? [mistressk] [ In reply to ]
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Given all this great advice, I realize that I may be able to go for it a bit earlier in November on the upper slopes of Mt St Helens while the ridge is still dry and the snow in the gullies is starting to build up. While I was originally against anything but running back down, I realize that glissading down is going to be SO MUCH FUCKING FUN.

Thanks all!

808 > NYC > PDX
2020 Races?: Nope.
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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hadukla wrote:
... on the upper slopes of Mt St Helens ...

I know it's been quite a while, and I'm sure things are fine now, but getting onto Mt. St. Helens would seriously freak me out

"Isn't RandMart the old punk rock dude who had the crazy ex? Then this post checks out"

Stop-Think-Consider-Do
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Re: Everest for running? [twcronin] [ In reply to ]
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That's the number I was told when I was there last year. But perhaps that was Kala Patthar viewpoint.
Our guide was certainly capable of running at that altitude, I wasn't.
At that altitude coherent thought was tricky, let alone running..
Exercise was sitting upright.

I assumed you were starting from scratch, to base camp. not base camp to peak.
Base camp to peak seems like eating the icing on a cake.......:0).
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Re: Everest for running? [hadukla] [ In reply to ]
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What about using a Ski resort that has tourism-type stuff going on in the summer?

For example, Mont Tremblant has the gondola running through the summer. You could run up the mountain, and then take the gondola back down, using the time to refuel, etc. The only trick is that I believe that the gondola only operates from 10am to 5pm or so, so I doubt it would be working for the whole Everest attempt - but if you timed it so that you hit the peak at exactly 10am and then hopefully took the last ride down, you'd at least have a good chunk of the day covered.
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