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Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help?
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My skin gets really dry from swimming, especially throughout the winter. I'm in the pool typically 4x per week (sometimes 3, sometimes 5) and have been trying out a variety of different ski lotions for after the swim but even still my skin gets and stays pretty dry.

I'm sure I'm not the only one with this issue. What have people found that helps? Any skin lotions work like magic? Maybe a certain soap (I just use whatever soap comes out of the wall mounted dispenser at my pool)?
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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Soap only worsens things here.

Gentle soaps only like Dove, Cerave, or Cetaphil.

The fix of lotion and lots of it.

Aveeno, Cerave, straight argan oil, etc


Creams better than lotions.

Right after you swim and after you shower
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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Spray on some vitamin C dissolved in water (1/3tsp per 8oz) and quickly rub it in before showering to neutralize the chlorine.

Gentle soaps like Dove.

Lots of lotion: Cereve or Lubraderm
Both after showering, and before bed.
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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You could drink more water also.

https://www.strava.com/...tes/zachary_mckinney
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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My wife loves the Zealios products. https://teamzealios.com/

Post shower follow up with coconut oil or quality lotion.
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [plant_based] [ In reply to ]
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Actually water has almost nothing to do with skin hydration unless severely dehydrated. Common myth
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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I use Zealios body wash and lotion. I think what makes that work so well for me is that the body wash is designed to get the chlorine and junk off and out of my skin. The lotion feels luxurious too.

Team Zoot
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I can tell you why you're sick, I just can't write you an Rx
2019: IMTX|IM 70.3 OOB| IMMD
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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I try to shower as soon as possible after swimming. I don’t use special soap.

I like Cetaphil moisturizer. It works well and doesn’t have a fragrance.
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [iamuwere] [ In reply to ]
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iamuwere wrote:
Actually water has almost nothing to do with skin hydration unless severely dehydrated. Common myth

Almost nothing? Doubtful.

https://dripdrop.com/...ater-causes-dry-skin

“Two Liters of Water per Day May Help Prevent Skin Dryness

A 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science ­–- one of the first clinical tests to examine hydration’s effect on skin physiology –- examined if the amount of water we drink matters in skin hydration. Ninety-three patients were included in the study, of which 86 completed, and they were required to drink 2.25 liters of water per day for four weeks. One group drank tap water and the other mineral water.

One interesting find: Skin health improved most for participants in the mineral water group who had drunken comparably little before the start of the study. So in other words, those of us who don’t drink a lot of water regularly may be putting added stress on our skin. Additionally, several individual participants had smoother, softer skin following the four weeks, which further suggests hydration’s role in skin health.”

The researchers ultimately concluded that “drinking more than 2 liters of water per day can have a significant impact on skin physiology.”

https://www.strava.com/...tes/zachary_mckinney
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [plant_based] [ In reply to ]
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I literally do skin research for a living. I have a pretty good grasp of the subject. An industry journal isn’t the best source compared to JAAD, Arch Derm, IJD, etc.
Feel free to hydrate. It’s probably good for you but it won’t fix swimming pool dry skin.
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [Northy] [ In reply to ]
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TRISWIM Chlorine Removal Swimmers Body Wash Moisturizing Repairing Skin https://www.amazon.com/..._apa_i_SKSnEbS3PJJCN

This gets rid of the itch and chlorine sweats during a second workout. Never had trouble with dry skin before but this stuff works well. Don't need to use much for it to work as well though I have a shaved head.

http://adambeston.blogspot.com
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [iamuwere] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks for the suggestion everyone. I'll give Dove, Zealios, and TRISWIM a try. And I'll keep working through different lotions/creams too.

I drink plenty of water, so I don't think that's an issue.
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [iamuwere] [ In reply to ]
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iamuwere wrote:
I literally do skin research for a living. I have a pretty good grasp of the subject. An industry journal isn’t the best source compared to JAAD, Arch Derm, IJD, etc.
Feel free to hydrate. It’s probably good for you but it won’t fix swimming pool dry skin.

Well, if it doesn't fix swimming pool dry skin, it at least helps with dry skin.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...articles/PMC4529263/

Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2015; 8: 413–421.
Published online 2015 Aug 3. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S86822
PMCID: PMC4529263
PMID: 26345226
Dietary water affects human skin hydration and biomechanics

It is generally assumed that dietary water might be beneficial for the health, especially in dermatological (age preventing) terms. The present study was designed to quantify the impact of dietary water on major indicators of skin physiology. A total of 49 healthy females (mean 24.5±4.3 years) were selected and characterized in terms of their dietary daily habits, especially focused in water consumption, by a Food Frequency Questionnaire. This allowed two groups to be set – Group 1 consuming less than 3,200 mL/day (n=38), and Group 2 consuming more than 3,200 mL/day (n=11). Approximately 2 L of water were added to the daily diet of Group 2 individuals for 1 month to quantify the impact of this surplus in their skin physiology. Measurements involving epidermal superficial and deep hydration, transepidermal water loss, and several biomechanical descriptors were taken at day 0 (T0), 15 (T1), and 30 (T2) in several anatomical sites (face, upper limb, and leg). This stress test (2 L/day for 30 days) significantly modified superficial and deep skin hydration, especially in Group 1. The same impact was registered with the most relevant biomechanical descriptors. Thus, in this study, it is clear that higher water inputs in regular diet might positively impact normal skin physiology, in particular in those individuals with lower daily water consumptions.


Conclusion

The present methodology allowed, for the first time, an objective clinical approach to study the effects of dietary water on normal skin physiology. These results seem to confirm that higher water inputs in one’s regular diet might positively impact normal skin physiology, as expressed by its hydration and biomechanical behavior, and in particular in those individuals with lower daily water consumptions.

https://www.strava.com/...tes/zachary_mckinney
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Re: Dry skin from swimming, any soaps that help? [plant_based] [ In reply to ]
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Are you literally going to cherry pick articles to argue with someone who does this (well) for a living?

Should I list a mountain of articles to counter.

I’ve engaged enough. You have a fascinating ability to argue a counter point in partially every thread I read on this forum.

OP gets it. Lotion more and he will feel better.

Later.
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