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Re: Swim - What is your Single Biggest Technique Improvement? [casual observer] [ In reply to ]
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casual observer wrote:
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I think watching and trying to apply what you see to your own stroke is a huge benefit. I was a lifeguard in college and there was a guy who would come in and swim primarily freestyle for long sets and had a a beautiful stroke. I would get in on my break and practice how he was swimming. I think it really made a difference! I still love to watch good swimmers. I actually like to watch bad swimmers too because it shows how crippling certain stroke dynamics can be. Gary Hall Sr. Has some great teaching videos on YouTube and when I am struggling with something in my stroke I go to the videos first. I did have the fastest swim in my A.G. In Kona. Not a huge accomplishment at my age;) The best part is having faster times than a lot of the pros!

Sorry, I gotta draw the line at watching bad swimmers as they are like listening to someone scratching their fingernails across a chalk blackboard. Just can't stand it. :)

Have you heard of the Isoman Triathlon in England??? This race features a 7.0 mile swim, 62.5 mi bike, and 26.2 mi run, e.g. designed to produce roughly equal times in each of the three disciplines if the athlete is equally proficient in all three.


"Anyone can be who they want to be IF they have the HUNGER and the DRIVE."
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Re: Swim - What is your Single Biggest Technique Improvement? [ericmulk] [ In reply to ]
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Eric,
I have not heard of this .. but now I am gonna have to look into it. ha (im a swimmer)

To the OP, there are some good points on this thread and some really non-useful ones. (But its nice people want to help)

Before you even decide to start swimming, it is most effective to look at what you actually bring to the water and how you "relate" to it physiologically. (meaning, your swimsuit, goggles and body. IE no floaty shorts or pull buoys etc)

There are two natural (unchangeable) factors that influence how to be the most efficient swimmer you can be. IE reaching your potential. Those two factors are COM (where you carry weight) and Density (ability to float or not). I have spoken about this before on this forum.
The two extremes are "floaters" or high COM and LOW density
and "sinkers" low COM and HIGH density.
Floaters have more options to reach potential and can chose, based on other natural factors to be DPS oriented or more TEMPO or turnover oriented.
Sinkers almost universally need to be Tempo focused. For obvious reasons.
A quick test is to keep your lungs filled with air and as horizontal to the surface as you can be. Then let yourself go. Maybe get someone to help. Check out how quickly you sink and how far your feet go down (angle from chin to ankle from surface) if you sink quickly and your feet are way below the surface, youre a sinker. And you can extrapolate from there up to being a floater. Youll need to do this test several time to get a more complete view bc even tho I called it simple.. its quite hard to let oneself go in the water.
Good luck

daved

http://www.theundergroundcoach.com
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Re: Swim - What is your Single Biggest Technique Improvement? [daved] [ In reply to ]
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Ya, the Isoman is triathlon as it should be if everyone knew how to swim decently. They have half and quarter Isoman versions also, plus relays in all three, and all are held on same day. For us in the States, it is def a "destination race" but prob no more expensive than a trip to Kona or one of the Euro iron races.


"Anyone can be who they want to be IF they have the HUNGER and the DRIVE."
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Re: Swim - What is your Single Biggest Technique Improvement? [Nonojohn] [ In reply to ]
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Nonojohn wrote:
TrierinKC wrote:
80% of your swim improvements will come from the underwater pull. I was told this years ago by Sheila Taormina and it turned out to be true, along with increased volume.


I did some tubing drills (search Youtube using Sheila T/tubing drill) for dry land work which helped my form.


Just wanted to say thanks. Watched the video. Tried keeping wrist locked while pointing fingers down (vs. previously bending wrist to point fingers down) to force EVF. Dropped 10sec off fastest 200y on repeats today. Couldn't maintain the 10sec the entire time, but still faster repeats than typical.

Glad it was useful, it certainly helped me.

2020: IMSG | IM70.3 Des Moines |
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