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To go di2 or not
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In a ideal world where I would fit on both bikes, which do you prefer? If price was nearly the the same +/- $300, which would you buy and WHY...

Cervelo p3 di2 or cervelo p5...
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Re: To go di2 or not [runfasterplz] [ In reply to ]
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P5 No Di2. Upgrade later. That frame is just so much better. Take the $300 and get a left side power meter and maybe a wheel cover.
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Re: To go di2 or not [runfasterplz] [ In reply to ]
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Ditto. Get the P5. That bike is beautiful. And, it is a butt-ton easier to upgrade to Di2 versus upgrading the frame.
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Re: To go di2 or not [exxxviii] [ In reply to ]
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Boom Thank you BOTH!
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Re: To go di2 or not [exxxviii] [ In reply to ]
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exxxviii wrote:
And, it is a butt-ton easier to upgrade to Di2 versus upgrading the frame.
I see what you did there...
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Re: To go di2 or not [runfasterplz] [ In reply to ]
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Di2 is an absolute must on a TT bike. I cannot imagine not having di2 on my P3. Minimal speed difference between the P3 and P5. But a big difference between mechanical and di2. If it was a road bike I would say it doesn’t matter much, but on a TT bike it is a MUST.
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Re: To go di2 or not [CG99] [ In reply to ]
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CG99 wrote:
Di2 is an absolute must on a TT bike.... If it was a road bike I would say it doesn’t matter much, but on a TT bike it is a MUST.

This seems like the exact opposite of what I’d expect. I don’t have Di2 but gear changes are much more frequent in road riding than TTs.

What am I missing?
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Re: To go di2 or not [michaer27] [ In reply to ]
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michaer27 wrote:
CG99 wrote:
Di2 is an absolute must on a TT bike.... If it was a road bike I would say it doesn’t matter much, but on a TT bike it is a MUST.


This seems like the exact opposite of what I’d expect. I don’t have Di2 but gear changes are much more frequent in road riding than TTs.
Ditto. There is a cool website called di2stats.com that analyzes your rides. I shift about 2x to 3x more frequently on my road bike than my TT bike. My last three road bike rides that were 50 - 60 miles all had around 950 shifts. My last three similar distance TT rides had 300 - 500 shifts.

Electronic shifting does not make me any faster, and I would always buy speed over electronic in the future. But, it sure is nice.
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Re: To go di2 or not [exxxviii] [ In reply to ]
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To di2 or not, this is a silly question
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Re: To go di2 or not [michaer27] [ In reply to ]
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Di2 on a TT bike means you can shift from the aero bars AND from the basebars. It is hugely beneficial on any vaguely technical course or hilly course to be able to do this. For example if you are climbing you will not want to be in the aero bars, you will be on the base bar, but do you really want to be taking one hand off the base bar to go to the extensions to shift a gear up or down???

On a road bike the benefits are marginal gains at best. I do like my di2 on a road bike too, but I don’t think there is much performance gain from it.

If all your rides are dead straight and dead flat then mechanical is fine on a TT bike, but on any rolling, technical or hilly course electronic shifting is essential.
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Re: To go di2 or not [CG99] [ In reply to ]
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"do you really want to be taking one hand off the base bar to go to the extensions to shift a gear up or down???"

Is this a problem for you? You are vastly overstating the time difference between DI2 and mech. "Essential"...really?
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Re: To go di2 or not [CG99] [ In reply to ]
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CG99 wrote:
on any rolling, technical or hilly course electronic shifting is essential.


Does that mean I have to return my podium medal for the 30 mile TT with 3000 foot elevation gain, done with mechanical and--gasp--ten speed? ;-)

"Ain't no shortcuts to the Opry."
Last edited by: Tri3: Jan 17, 19 7:50
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Re: To go di2 or not [Tri3] [ In reply to ]
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With the p5 you can also get yann's speed box.
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Re: To go di2 or not [runfasterplz] [ In reply to ]
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Depends on if you ever plan on upgrading your components or not. Personally I’d rather the Di2 than the better frame. I’m a cheapskate that likes to get the most for his $$$ and in my opinion the shifting capabilities would be what I’d chose if I could only have one. With that said I have a 10 speed ultegra with vision metron shifters.

We tend to forget that my 2011 setup was leagues ahead of what was winning the TDF in 2005

I still lapped everyone on the couch!
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Re: To go di2 or not [runfasterplz] [ In reply to ]
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This is interesting. The P5 frame is faster but so is Di2 than mechanical. Electronic shifting allows you to keep your momentum easier/better than mechanical shifting over changing terrain. You have less power spikes and you are more efficient cycling and stronger coming off the bike.

Bottom line is I would get the P5 and upgrade to Di2 ASAP.
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Re: To go di2 or not [CG99] [ In reply to ]
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Nice to have? - Sure

A very, very slight time saver? - Perhaps (IF you'll be spending significant time on the basebar and needing to change gear from that location)

A slight safety advantage? - Perhaps (IF you'll be spending significant time on the basebar and needing to change gear from that location)

A slight failure risk increase? - Perhaps

Essential? - Don't be silly
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Re: To go di2 or not [Tri3] [ In reply to ]
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Tri3 wrote:
CG99 wrote:
on any rolling, technical or hilly course electronic shifting is essential.


Does that mean I have to return my podium medal for the 30 mile TT with 3000 mile elevation gain, done with mechanical and--gasp--ten speed? ;-)

I'm beginning to wonder if I should stop climbing in aero. Or staying in aero around corners. The mechanical 10 speed on my Transition should have killed me by now based on all these generalizations.

"...the street finds its own uses for things"
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Re: To go di2 or not [Scottxs] [ In reply to ]
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i would go with p3 or p2 frame as i have come to detest bb mounted brakes of any kind. you have to do more frequent maintenance of them, well at least cleaning. every bb brake i have had has started to lose function in relatively short period of time. yes, many folks use them no issues, but a good ride in the rain and you really need to get in there and get it cleaned up before it starts to quit operating smoothly. again, this may not be an issue for others.

also, p5 is not much if any faster than a p3 when you get the parts you want on the p3(at cheaper overall cost after you get said parts(bars)).

di2 is not a necessity as you should not be riding with hands on brake levers to begin with going up, down or on flat terrain. for TTs, even fixed gear can work very well for people :)

get the bike that offers the adjustability you want in your cockpit(assuming same frame size) say p3 with tririg one vs the p5 with aduro. i wouldnt base the decision on di2 vs mech
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Re: To go di2 or not [Scottxs] [ In reply to ]
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Scottxs wrote:
......Electronic shifting allows you to keep your momentum easier/better than mechanical shifting over changing terrain. You have less power spikes and you are more efficient cycling and stronger coming off the bike....
That's a stretch!
How significant are gear change related power spikes? How much are these effected by whether you have mechanical or electronic gear changes?
Both are small and I'd happily religate the combo to the negligible pile with respect to impact to both pace and leg condition for the run.
I think these seem more like purchase self-justification arguments than actual quantifiable reasons to choose Di2.
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Re: To go di2 or not [Ai_1] [ In reply to ]
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I'm thinking back to last season's races. I raced just 3 times (2 sprints and a 70.3). I probably shifted from the base bar a dozen times, mostly on the first race of the year which had a multi-loop course. That course featured such niceties as gale force winds getting funnelled between buildings, a quartering tailwind section that led into an uphill 90degree corner into the headwind, 2 U turns per lap (1 wide and 1 tight), and frigid temps which meant that the swim was cancelled due to hypothermia risk.

Mechanical was fine.

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Last edited by: JasoninHalifax: Jan 17, 19 9:32
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Re: To go di2 or not [JasoninHalifax] [ In reply to ]
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If I got to choose the bike for a competitor who was exactly my equal, and the choices were P3 with Di2 or P5 with mechanical. I would choose the P3 every freakin' time. No matter what the course. Absolute no brainer.
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Re: To go di2 or not [CG99] [ In reply to ]
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This makes more sense now. I ride a P2 and was contemplating moving to Di2. My mechanic advised me that moving to Di2 would cut weight off my bike with all the cabling, etc, etc, allowing me to go faster. I am not sure he is correct in this. I will be at IMTX and IMAZ this year, both courses are relatively flat so mechanical seems sufficient. The only course this year that might benefit from Di2 would be 70.3WC in Nice.
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Re: To go di2 or not [DesertTriGuy] [ In reply to ]
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If a mechanic was trying to sell you on Di2 for a road bike on the basis of weight savings, I think he was full of it.
Weight is NOT a major factor for most tri bike applications. If it were, you'd be on your road bike.
The weight savings, if any, from a mechanical to Di2 switch is minor (I don't know the figures, but I suspect the additional weight of mechanical cables versus electrical cables is mostly, or completely offset by the extra weight of actuated derailleurs, and the battery?) and I'll bet there's better places to spend the money on weight or drag reductions that will make a much bigger difference.
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