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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [MattyK] [ In reply to ]
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Yep, there you go.

Oh, and I tried the lazy susan out. Not bad...

To breathe, to feel, to know I'm alive.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [velocomp] [ In reply to ]
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I just finished one myself based on a couple of designs I saw on the Facebook Rocker Plate Forum.

Just to give credit where it is due, here's a link to the forum, and I'm not posting pictures of mine, but rather the ideas that I took from 'Martin SSpeed' and 'McGwire' Forum users. Here's their two inspirations:

Martin SSpeed used pillow bearings, inflatables on either side to balance and fixed cups to hold the trainer in, and the unit is only built to the size of the trainer.
- I liked that it's not a full size unit (less parts = less cost). It can be constructed from two 2'x4' pieces of plywood.


-The idea of Pillow bearings is cool, but man that get's expensive fast! It costs around $10-$12 a pillow bearing (from princessauto.com) of which you need four of them. Next, you need a rod to run through the pillow bearing and that costs about $30 for an 8 foot pole. And let's not forget nuts bolts and washers and that all seem to cost about $1 each at home depot.




The McGwire board was different in that it didn't rely upon pillow bearings, but rather vibration dampeners. A two pack costs $20 and it's all you need to support you and the trainer (it has a load capacity of 2220lbs).


So, I decided to make a hybrid of the two. Smaller unit that uses vibration dampeners. Instead of inflatable balls on either side, I stuck with beginner tennis balls (orange dot and green dot) with different levels of squishiness that I stole from my kid (he's in a tennis academy).

This is my version 1.0. with 1/2" plywood. I'll likely make another version out of 3/4" plywood and make the cuts/holes nicer. The movement seems pretty good, but the improvement in comfort hasn't quite been as dramatic as some have reported. I'll likely do more research on what others are doing differently.



Last edited by: beston: Jan 27, 19 16:38
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [beston] [ In reply to ]
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My first guess is the vibration dampeners work "too well". But obviously I don't know. Finally decided I want to build something like this so I'll be keeping an eye out for these threads and the FB group.
Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Chan] [ In reply to ]
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While I can't exclude that the vibration dampeners are worse than the pillow bearing approach, I get a lot of side to side movement/flex with the dampeners (so I don't think it's the difference between pillow bearings vs. dampeners).

Even with the dampeners, I still have to use some kind ball/cushion on the side to help stabilize the rocker. I've been using tennis balls (three per side), and I suppose I could mess around with how many I use to see if I can't get a better 'feel' with fewer balls on either side
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [beston] [ In reply to ]
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Maybe this is not an issue for much of the readership here, but I'll share this. Love the minimalist idea of a plate that is only as big as needed for the trainer. However, as a person of shorter stature, I think I'd have a challenging time getting on / off my bike without the full length board under it. The trainer already puts it a couple inches higher. The trainer plus rocker would add, what, 6 inches to the hight needed to clear the saddle?

To breathe, to feel, to know I'm alive.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [beston] [ In reply to ]
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So just to add to the conversation and with the caveat that today is the very first day of my research.

I've noticed there's a huge difference in the dampening capabilities of the dampener. From say 10lbs to hundreds of lbs. I've seen several builds with dampeners from different sources so I'm hoping to understand more how much force different people's completed builds dampen. I know there's more than one measurement. I think one is static and one is shear force.

Anyways I understand that's not your issue but this may help anybody as uninitiated as me.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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Full length boards are cool, but I'm not sure a full length board would be much help for a shorter person. I've always just clipped in with my left foot and swung my right foot over. No need to straddle the bike before clipping in.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [beston] [ In reply to ]
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That is my technique as well. Trainer or not, I mount the bike pretty much the same way. fwiw, i measure a scant 66"

My YouTubes

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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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I use a 5 gallon bucket turned upside down as a step stool for getting on/off. Takes a little bit of practice, but works great.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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I think I'd rather keep the rocker itself minimal. Less rocker inertia definitely seems preferable to me. Plus I'd prefer less bulk. I also think a stationary platform is going to be a better for mounting. Why not just make up a little step? A standalone step is simple, all you would need but you could attach it to the rocker base if you wanted to ensure it doesn't move. Surely that's a better solution than a big, heavy, unnecessary platform?
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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Just mount your steed like one of the knights of Ni! /pink.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Chan] [ In reply to ]
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Chan wrote:
So just to add to the conversation and with the caveat that today is the very first day of my research.
I've noticed there's a huge difference in the dampening capabilities of the dampener. From say 10lbs to hundreds of lbs. I've seen several builds with dampeners from different sources so I'm hoping to understand more how much force different people's completed builds dampen. I know there's more than one measurement. I think one is static and one is shear force.

Anyways I understand that's not your issue but this may help anybody as uninitiated as me.

I've seen the differences in load capacity and deflection too. When I saw the dampeners in person, some of that made sense as the <100lb capacity dampeners were very small (like an inch high).

The one that I bought has a relatively huge load capacity (2200lbs) and what I thought was lower deflection. (link here). I thought it would be too stiff, but I don't think that's the case since the board easily deflects laterally, so much so that I need some kind of cushion out on either side to keep the unit centred (not tipping over) while riding (I've just used tennis balls as my cushion).
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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The height difference is more like 3 inches rather than 6 (2x12mm plywood sheets+2 inches of spacing between the boards) but you do need to consider your weight is also a big factor in rocker plate design.

The less a rider weighs the lower the design tolerances are for a rocker. In effect the more mass you are throwing around on the bike the less details like the floor being level, the trainer being counter balanced and/or the location of the inflatable balls being spot on matters. As rider mass decreases the forces created by your movements on the bike decrease as total fraction of the system and your room for error drops significantly.

If you are vertically challenged I am going to guess you are on the lower end of the mass spectrum and that means you need to take extra care with rocker plates.
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [Tsunami] [ In reply to ]
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Tsunami,

For my home-made rocker, I purchased two of these multi-purpose folding mats: I use one under the front wheel riser block and another one as a step-stool. Folding the mat in half works great and is the ideal height.

@Kid
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [mickison] [ In reply to ]
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I recently built one and it has made my rides more comfortable for sure. I went with the minimalist approach.

I used 4 vibration mounts and two racquetballs. I like the racquetballs the best as they "give" more than other balls I tried. Plus, they are small enough that they work without cutting holes in the wood (one less thing to do).

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DNF8ZGK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Re: Anybody here built a rocker plate for their trainer? [scott8888] [ In reply to ]
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Hi folks, thanks for all the responses. The Wahoo Snap holds my bike with 700 cc wheels, 1.5 inches off the ground. The SBR Rockr I purchased is 3.5 inches tall, for a total stack of 5" which indeed would be significant if I had to clear the saddle from the floor. The bike, on an unstable platform and the trainer was initially held on with velcro straps, is in a tight spot in a bedroom so yes, I do straddle it on the platform vs stepping on the pedal for extra height. Goal is to not gauge the wall with my cleat. Now that I have the Snap secured with eye hooks screwed into the platform and hose clamps around the base bars and through the eye hooks, I could probably do the pedal step and over thing.

To breathe, to feel, to know I'm alive.
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