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computrainer eating tires ???
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I've had my c-trainer for 12 months now and it has just started eating tires. It first happened when I put my new cervelo P2k on the trainer. I assumed that it was just a bad tire (Kenda Koncept). I replaced the Kenda with a Specialized Flak Jacket tire. This is a great training tire, weighs a ton and is really tough rubber. I put this new tire on the trainer last night and it is getting the same problem.

On the floor below the trainer there are little pieces of rubber, like the pieces of rubber that come off an eraser. I'm still trying to get in touch with Racermate, but you know how that is. Any ideas?
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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I have the same problem on my Cycleops 2 Fluid trainer, there is little bits of rubber on the floor?




"You're guaranteed to miss 100% of the shots you never take" - Wayne Gretzky
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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Well I just have some sugestions but I'm really interested since I hope to have a computrainer someday. I'd like to hear your thoughts on it and if it's helpful.

Is the part touching your tire still smooth or grooved?

Could your bike be a little loose in the trainer and wiggling side to side or rubbing the side of the trainer?

How's your air pressure?

Doing harder courses?

Could the trainer be heating up from age or use and melting the tires?

Post what you find out and how racermate's customer service is. That will be a factor in me buying one. Let them know you have potential customers waiting to see how they help you.

Formerly from Rochester, NY, then Atlanta, GA, now Boulder, Co.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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I've had my CT for two years and haven't had any problems regarding tire-eating with any greater rapidity than road-riding. I had Conti GP3000s on when I first got it, and they made enough whirring noise that it drove me batty. I switched to Michelin Axial Pros, the noise abated to what I consider a more typical level (expecting total silence is a bit much) , and I have stuck with the flavor of the month of that tire without issue. It has less tread than the Contis, and I figured that made the difference. Intuitively, it seems to me that one would have less issue riding a tire with little or no tread on a "small" roller such as found on a CT or other trainers. I'd also suggest you check the tire tracking and make sure that it is staying centered on the roller. If you have significant lateral tracking back and forth, you may be stressing the tire more.

Good luck,

Dan
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [dre125038] [ In reply to ]
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I use those smooth Michelan (sp) tires. They last about 1500 trainer miles. When they go though rubber everywhere. :)
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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This same thing happened to me with my Continentals on my CT after about 5 months. But I still have used the same tire and haven't had to replace it. I had an old mag trainer from Nashbar that ate up tires much quicker but I don't think the CT is as bad. I'm not worried about it, but have you been cleaning your tires with the rubbing alocohol before you ride? Just a thought.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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Tom (and other trainer riders):

Trainers don't eat tires like that unless something is wrong. Your tire is not square to the roller if that happens. It's running at an angle and grinding its way up the "road" by constantly slipping sideways a little.

Either [1] you've got a quick release mounting problem, [2] your bike has a severe dropout alignment problem, or [3] your trainer has gotten kinked somehow. Check all the bolts on the trainer and make sure everything is as straight as your eye can gauge. A new quality bike shouldn't have an alignment problem that severe. You would have noticed it simply by mounting the wheels.

Some quick releases don't have end caps suited to trainer clamps, and the bike will clamp a little crooked. The old-fashioned Dura-Ace are the best I've found. You want a QR with a smooth, round end bolt where the little lever folds down out of the way so it doesn't touch the trainer clamp.

The newer lightweight types that are square-ish in the ends are bad. For example, I have the Ritchey Wheels that came on Cervelos for a while, and the Ritchey quick releases cause my bike to mount crooked. Some trainers come with their own quick releases for this very reason (my 1-Up did).

If you don't have a set of old-style QR's, find a rear one somehow and try that. Again, I think the Dura-Ace are best because they're the right shape and they're made of metal instead of plastic.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [damn] [ In reply to ]
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I spoke with c-trainer today, their opinion is that the roller is not pressing tightly enough to the tire. I'm using the same force as I always have so I'm going to look at the alignment of the roller tonight.

My biggest complaint with c-trainer service is that they don't open until 9 pacific time. I'm on Central, and I'm also a very early morning person - I wake up around 4:30am and I can't talk to c-trainer until after 11am. Sometimes I have a little trouble getting someone on the phone but if I call before 2pm Central I can usually get someone very fast.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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It is a common problem, and what Racermate suggests is to apply rubbing alcohol to your tires just before starting your workout, and it does work. Assuming all obvious probs such as poor alignment, etc are eliminated, the tire wear is likely caused by wheel slippage which is corrected with alcohol. The prob will of course be worse with higher work loads. Observationally, I think there is something unique about Conti rubber that makes it more susceptible. I usually buy whatever clincher is on blowout from Performance, keep alcohol applied liberally, and can usu make tires last 6 mos. or so. My CT gets a lot of usage, usu about 1500 miles per year.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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Sounds like a skewer problem is at least part of it since it got worse with a new bike.

Always keep the roller and tire clean - CT says before each use. Always use slick tires. If you have a dedicated trainer bike deflate the tire after each session to avoid getting dents in the tire which accelerate its destruction. Adjust the roller pressure just hard enough to keep it from slipping and ideally adjust it each session based on what kind of effort you are going to do. In my experience wider tires hold up much better than narrow and mid range tires better than hi or low priced ones. Michelin have been the longest lasting for me. Conti the absolute worst, in one case less than a month until the tread starting coming off the casing in big pieces.

I do a lot of climbing on mine (the Stelvio and others) so despite all those precautions I usually go through 2 or 3 tires a year.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [mises] [ In reply to ]
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I rode it this am for 90' with no problems. The difference, I took extra care to alcohol the tires well and get the press-on force higher than normal.

I always use the skewer that c-trainer sent. The tires are always at 110psi, they are smooth hard rubber tires. The alignment is acceptable.

I think c-trainer support was correct, they suggested that the tire was slipping in very tiny amounts since I didn't notice it. When I gave it plenty of press-on force the problem went away. When I said it was eating tires, I mean the tire would be destroyed in 1 or 2 sessions.
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Re: computrainer eating tires ??? [tom] [ In reply to ]
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I had this same problem on both my computrainer and Tacx. This was using a kena Koncept tire. I switched to a Hutchinson Chrono and the problem went away


Jason Goldberg
FIT Multisports
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