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High HR when running
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Hi All,

About Me


36 years old and quite active but not massively fit
Did my first sprint triathlon about a month ago in a stupidly slow time of 2hrs 10 mins
I don't cycle much these days as I have no indoor set up or space, and I'm really busy with work

Running


I started running about 10 months ago but quite inconsistent. I can now run 5k most days if I wanted, and sometimes 10k 2-3 times a month if needed.

I am slow, I run a 5k in about 32 minutes.

I have a Garmin Fenix 6 and a Wahoo HR strap to go with it. I noticed when I first go it that when out on a "normal" run, my HR was about 170-180. I now know that this is in the very high range.

On another run, I tried to slow RIGHT down and it was still about 160.

Today, I went out:
  • I was running about 12 mins per mile at times
  • I covered only about 2.5 miles before I stopped as my HR was just continually going up and I was stopping so often
  • I stopped running anytime my HR went about 150 which was every 40-45 seconds roughly
  • After about 10 seconds of walking I started to run again
his is because my watch keeps telling me I am training too hard.

Today whilst running, I don't think I could have gone slower, it was almost embarassing, as I was jogging but barely moving anywhere.

Any advice?

Any thoughts on this? My resting HR is about 55 bpm, my top is 185bpm.

Thanks all






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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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What was outside temp?
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Re: High HR when running [DFW_Tri] [ In reply to ]
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DFW_Tri wrote:
What was outside temp?

Cool and overcast. I am in the UK.

Temperature - 12C / 53F
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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redrabbit wrote:
DFW_Tri wrote:
What was outside temp?

Cool and overcast. I am in the UK.

Temperature - 12C / 53F
How much do you weigh?
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Re: High HR when running [duganator99] [ In reply to ]
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duganator99 wrote:
redrabbit wrote:
DFW_Tri wrote:
What was outside temp?


Cool and overcast. I am in the UK.

Temperature - 12C / 53F

How much do you weigh?

I am 5ft 7 in height and weigh around 175lbs. That is heavier than the normal runner but I am generally broader and have a past history in weight lifting.

That could be why I'm guessing but I would have thought it wouldn't affect my HR so much - I've been running for 9-10 months now
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Re: High HR when running [DFW_Tri] [ In reply to ]
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DFW_Tri wrote:
What was outside temp?

My first question as well.

With gyms closed during the summer I had to run outside and would have massive cardiac drift when running in the morning when it was 85º, 95% humidity and a dew point of 78º. So when its warm and humid, higher HR is to be expected.

But if it's in the 50's, then that's prime running weather. I suspect you may just need more consistent training and the HR will slowly start to come down relative to pace.
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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redrabbit wrote:
duganator99 wrote:
redrabbit wrote:
DFW_Tri wrote:
What was outside temp?


Cool and overcast. I am in the UK.

Temperature - 12C / 53F

How much do you weigh?

I am 5ft 7 in height and weigh around 175lbs. That is heavier than the normal runner but I am generally broader and have a past history in weight lifting.

That could be why I'm guessing but I would have thought it wouldn't affect my HR so much - I've been running for 9-10 months now
Unfortunately weight is a pretty big deal. How hilly is the area you run in?
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Re: High HR when running [duganator99] [ In reply to ]
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duganator99 wrote:
Unfortunately weight is a pretty big deal. How hilly is the area you run in?

It was flat as a pancake.

I am planning on losing about 14-16lbs roughly, but I don't want to go too light. Maintaining some shape/muscle is still important to me.

From what I've read online it's about base building. But I thought I'd have done that by now :-(
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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HR is very individual and you have to learn what's normal for you. For example, a zone 1 run, which feels like I'm barely faster than a walk, is in the low 160s. If I were to run a 5k-10k for a personal best, my HR would be in the low 190s. I'm not even close the the highest 'normal' of people that I've worked with. So, continue to run and learn your numbers. Then let your numbers decide what is high/ low for your heart.

(Note: Make sure you pay attention to more than just the HR numbers though. Like, does it feel like your heart is working harder than normal? Are you excessively winded for the effort? Is your HR higher than expected for you at that pace?)






Take a short break from ST and read my blog:
http://tri-banter.blogspot.com/
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Re: High HR when running [Tri-Banter] [ In reply to ]
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Tri-Banter wrote:
HR is very individual and you have to learn what's normal for you. For example, a zone 1 run, which feels like I'm barely faster than a walk, is in the low 160s. If I were to run a 5k-10k for a personal best, my HR would be in the low 190s. I'm not even close the the highest 'normal' of people that I've worked with. So, continue to run and learn your numbers. Then let your numbers decide what is high/ low for your heart.

(Note: Make sure you pay attention to more than just the HR numbers though. Like, does it feel like your heart is working harder than normal? Are you excessively winded for the effort? Is your HR higher than expected for you at that pace?)

Thanks. That sounds like great advice

Is it worth me also doing a "lactate guided threshold test" which my Garmin has on there?
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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If you do the 30 min HR test you'll know a lot more. Run 30 mins at the max pace you can sustain for the whole 30 mins. Start your HR measurement after 10 min (use the lap button on your Fenix). In the last 10 min you should hit your max HR. Using that you can calculate your zones for training.

You could have a natural ability to have a HR when running. I'm 60 years old. Calculations say my z2 is 120 and my max HR is 160. In the 30 min test, my max HR is 177 and my zone 2 is 128-137. My wife is 60 and her max is 187 - much higher than even mine.
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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As Mr. Banter said...its more important to know how it feels...and then learn to associate the HR with that feeling and pace. It will vary with temperature, humidity, fatigue, etc. But, you will learn what normal "should be" for any particular set of circumstances.

A new runner like you...should just run easy. Focus on running at a pace that is comfortable and you can hold a conversation easily...and that you can hold for the entire length of your workout without stopping. Don't worry about your HR much. It should really just be perceived exertion at this point. Do that for a while and learn what your HR looks like when you run "easy". Learn what your HR looks like when you run a hard 5k. Learn what your HR looks like when its hot outside vs. cool vs. cold. Learn what your paces are like in these different situations.

Once you've done that for a while and have learned what to expect, then you can begin to use HR as a guide for some things. But, I don't use HR all that much. I run by pace and perceived exertion, and only use HR as a limiter when its super hot outside. Otherwise, I don't even display it on most of my watch screens.
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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redrabbit wrote:
Is it worth me also doing a "lactate guided threshold test" which my Garmin has on there?

I wouldn't bother at this point. If you run a 5k or a 10k or something make note of your avg pace and HR from the race, as that can/will be useful down the line. But, for now...I'd just focus on how you FEEL, and increasing your volume and frequency. When you've got some months under your belt, with some more miles in your legs...maybe revisit the threshold test idea.
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Re: High HR when running [Tom_hampton] [ In reply to ]
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OP

Listen to Tom---trust me on this...
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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Some cross training also could be helpful to increase your cardio engine like cycling, elliptical, stair-master, walking up a steep incline on the treadmill, jump rope, etc.

https://www.strava.com/...tes/zachary_mckinney
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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redrabbit wrote:
Hi All,

About Me


36 years old and quite active but not massively fit
Did my first sprint triathlon about a month ago in a stupidly slow time of 2hrs 10 mins
I don't cycle much these days as I have no indoor set up or space, and I'm really busy with work

Running


I started running about 10 months ago but quite inconsistent. I can now run 5k most days if I wanted, and sometimes 10k 2-3 times a month if needed.

I am slow, I run a 5k in about 32 minutes.

I have a Garmin Fenix 6 and a Wahoo HR strap to go with it. I noticed when I first go it that when out on a "normal" run, my HR was about 170-180. I now know that this is in the very high range.

On another run, I tried to slow RIGHT down and it was still about 160.

Today, I went out:
  • I was running about 12 mins per mile at times
  • I covered only about 2.5 miles before I stopped as my HR was just continually going up and I was stopping so often
  • I stopped running anytime my HR went about 150 which was every 40-45 seconds roughly
  • After about 10 seconds of walking I started to run again
his is because my watch keeps telling me I am training too hard.

Today whilst running, I don't think I could have gone slower, it was almost embarassing, as I was jogging but barely moving anywhere.

Any advice?

Any thoughts on this? My resting HR is about 55 bpm, my top is 185bpm.

Thanks all



It actually sounds like your Wahoo Tickr is faulty. I've had 3 Wahoo Tickrs die on me. One worked well until it died, the other was highly inconsistent, similar to the inconsistency you can get with optical HRMs. The first one I got a credit and I bought a Tickr X. This was faulty out of the box and would read incredibly low. They replaced it with another Tickr (not the X) and this one has been fine. I would imagine the 180 bpm you are getting on your "normal run" is a faulty reading, this is zone 5 for you. I think you can calibrate the Wahoo HRMs with the app? Perhaps do a 3km run with the Wahoo Tickr, not the HR then do a 3km run the next day with your Fenix 6 optical HRM and compare. The optical HRMs aren't great, but it should still give you a closish reading to the Wahoo, if the Wahoo is working correctly.
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Re: High HR when running [Tri-Banter] [ In reply to ]
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Tri-Banter wrote:
HR is very individual and you have to learn what's normal for you. For example, a zone 1 run, which feels like I'm barely faster than a walk, is in the low 160s. If I were to run a 5k-10k for a personal best, my HR would be in the low 190s. I'm not even close the the highest 'normal' of people that I've worked with. So, continue to run and learn your numbers. Then let your numbers decide what is high/ low for your heart.

(Note: Make sure you pay attention to more than just the HR numbers though. Like, does it feel like your heart is working harder than normal? Are you excessively winded for the effort? Is your HR higher than expected for you at that pace?)

My RHR is in low 40s (used to be mid 30s when in my 30s) 46yo.

My record is a 192 HR average for my second half marathon (2h02m). Even now, a few years later then I am at 170 for 1h35 for that distance. On the bike, my HR is 130 if I push 210w, 140hr for 250w (IM pace) and 145-150 for 70.3 pace (270w). Running tend to sit at 160-170 for long distance (25-33k) training runs. My peak is nowaday at 197hr for absolute all out death sprints on zwift / running hill sprint reps. In the past 210hr was a peak.

So regardless of fitness (wasn't fit before, would say I was for the last Half marathon) and with 20 years of fairly consistent endurance training then my HR still doesn't respond like textbooks say. I start low, go higher than most, but then also am able to sustain those high HR for a long time.

Just embrace it, if you've a concern at all, then talk to your doc. They may chose to run some tests, in my case they gave me a 72hr HR monitor. But you'll then feel more confident and worry less.
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Re: High HR when running [Duncan74] [ In reply to ]
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Slow down and slowly build mileage. Stick to not adding more than 10 percent of miles/time from the previous week.

It’s going to suck for a couple months, but Rome wasn’t built in a day.

I run 60 miles a week and 85 percent or more of them are in the middle range of my zone 2 HR.
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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When I first started at 35 year old I was running 13.5 min/miles to stay at 145 bpm so you can slow down more.
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Re: High HR when running [zedzded] [ In reply to ]
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sometimes my wahoo reads my cadence vs my hr. it almost always corrects itself in the first 5-10 min though.
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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You might want to get an EKG done. I went for a long time thinkIng I run with a high HR naturally and also thought my HR strap was faulty at one point. I discovered later I was in A-fib. I was 37 y/o at the time.
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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As I got into my 40s I found that at the start of my runs my HR will spike (10k race level....even though I'm running quite slowly) and stay high for the first mile or so, then drop to where it should be. It then subsequently creeps up due to HR drift.

This graph is pretty typical. The drops are waiting at stop lights, and FWIW the first mile was my slowest despite the high (for me) HR.


ECMGN Therapy Silicon Valley:
Depression, Neurocognitive problems, Dementias (Testing and Evaluation), Trauma and PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
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Re: High HR when running [Titanflexr] [ In reply to ]
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I've attached my HR graph for a run I did about a week ago. This was 5 miles in Autumn weather - not hot. I didn't push it but just ran relaxed and non stop.

Average pace - 10:51 mins/mile
Average cadence - 159
average HR:169
Highest HR: 176


Last edited by: redrabbit: Oct 14, 20 23:41
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Re: High HR when running [redrabbit] [ In reply to ]
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Your heart rate graph looks normal to me. You're 36, with a bigger build, running steady on a flat course in cool weather. It feels like a relaxed pace and if you weren't in pain or feeling like vomiting, I'd say you're ok,. Just keep running and building up those weekly base miles.

How many miles per week are you running? Just based on some very broad generalizations, hitting 176 is no big deal for the average in shape 36 year old guy. Wouldn't be surprised if you can push 195 bpm in race day.
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Re: High HR when running [talegater] [ In reply to ]
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talegater wrote:
Your heart rate graph looks normal to me. You're 36, with a bigger build, running steady on a flat course in cool weather. It feels like a relaxed pace and if you weren't in pain or feeling like vomiting, I'd say you're ok,. Just keep running and building up those weekly base miles.

How many miles per week are you running? Just based on some very broad generalizations, hitting 176 is no big deal for the average in shape 36 year old guy. Wouldn't be surprised if you can push 195 bpm in race day.

Thanks talegater, that's really helpful. I have a 10k "race" on Saturday. Hoping for around 60 minutes. I will see how my HR works out.

After this I'm going to stop monitoring HR for a while as it is sucking the fun out of running.

I'm only doing about 10-12 miles a week at the moment. Around spring I did get up to 17.

I'm now focusing quite heavily on running now so going to try to build up to around 20 miles.
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