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Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train?
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Every week we see posts like this: "Serious medical condition: Should I train?"

I have to interject, and I'm surprised no one in an official capacity has done this before, like Slowman or other moderator:

Is an internet forum an appropriate place to ask medical advice? Even M.D.'s who post on this forum- what else can we say besides, "That sounds serious- consult a physcian."

I posted I was having a headache on this forum. I was having a stroke. I didn't need my forum buddies right then: well, I always do, but in that instance I needed a doctor- right away.

Saddle discomfort? Sore muscles? Shoud I train when I have a cold? Yeah- forum stuff...

Any malady with a name that looks like a scrabble game dropped on the floor? Doctor.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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I'm probably not ready for my HIM on May 15th. Should I train? :shrug:

Jay

45 AG triathlete and terrible BMX racer, Tampa FL
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Jay G] [ In reply to ]
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fiddlesticks.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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:biglaugh:

I am on, and was a moderator for 8 years, a Florida sport fishing forum, and it's never ceased to amaze me how many people will post medical conditions they're going through to a group of relative strangers on the internet when anyone reading it with half a brain can see they should be in a doctors office or the ER. :smacks forehead with hand: Sometimes it's like having front row seats to Darwinism in action.

And I'm sorry to hear about the stroke, I hope all is well now.

Jay

45 AG triathlete and terrible BMX racer, Tampa FL
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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Is an internet forum an appropriate place to ask medical advice? Even M.D.'s who post on this forum- what else can we say besides, "That sounds serious- consult a physcian."


Not true at all!!...a certain "cranky" inventor was always liberal with his expert advice...;-)


Coach at KonaCoach Multisport
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Jay G] [ In reply to ]
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Thanks. I came through with flying colors.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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LOL..................that was a great post.

I think I'm really really super sick, near death with a disease that I can't even say, yet be able to spell.....should I train? Should I do my scheduled brick of 75/12 today?

Dude.....call a frickn' doctor!!!!

.
.
Paul
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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Tom, wasn't it here on the forum that someone said you might be having a stroke and to get to the doctor? I thought I read a post from you talking about that once. Maybe I'm just imagining things though.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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If you have already been diagnosed by a physician with a medical condition and have already asked the physician whether it is OK to train, then I think it's OK to ask on ST too. Most doctors I've dealt with who don't see a lot of endurance athletes are reluctant to opine when I ask them about training with non-life-threatening medical conditions. People on this forum, including M.D.s, have experiences and expertise that you likely won't get from your treating physicians.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [LuckyMe] [ In reply to ]
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Absolutely true. You're right.

I guess there are two ways to look at it:

1. I was having the worst headache I ever experienced, was disoriented and losing my vision: I posted on Slowtwitch.

2. I was having the worst headache I ever experienced, was disoriented and losing my vision: I should have called 911.

When I got to the hospital they told me, if I had gotten there earlier they may have been able to save some of my vision with "clot busting" drugs that can be administered early on in stroke symptoms. The drugs clear the clot (mine was an embolism they think though) and may reduce damage from a stroke.

Instead of going to the hospital I was at work. It wasn't until my friend Pierre came in and I described my symptoms that I decided to go. Had I gone sooner I might have recovered faster and had less damage. As it was, I was lucky. My point- I shouldn't have been posting on ST. I should have sought medical attention.

I'll suggest that is the same thing some of the medical issues that are brought up here on the forum.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Mark Lemmon] [ In reply to ]
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"If you have already been diagnosed by a physician with a medical condition and have already asked the physician whether it is OK to train, then I think it's OK to ask on ST too. Most doctors I've dealt with who don't see a lot of endurance athletes are reluctant to opine when I ask them about training with non-life-threatening medical conditions."

That's probably a valid point Mark but I wonder about the wisdom of subordinating a physician's opinion (granted they usually arne't "endurance literate") to forum doctrine or advice. It's tough to hold the forum accountable for malpractice.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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It seems to me however that you didn't go because you're a stubborn jackass, not because you were seeking medical advice here on ST.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [jpb] [ In reply to ]
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Well, there is that.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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Tom Demerly wrote:
That's probably a valid point Mark but I wonder about the wisdom of subordinating a physician's opinion (granted they usually arne't "endurance literate") to forum doctrine or advice. It's tough to hold the forum accountable for malpractice.

If I ask for such advice on ST, I will hold myself accountable.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Mark Lemmon] [ In reply to ]
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You're one of the smarter ones Sir.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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I'm in complete agreement with the original post. I'll put it bluntly: Get your ass to the doctor. HTFU is fast way to get flowers planted on your behalf.

I nearly lost my wife twice because she ignored symptoms to stay at work and "get stuff done". The way this happened, I found out, is so common that I think I'll write another post regarding it.



Punching cockroaches from day 1.
http://www.tri-junkie.com/
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Mark Lemmon] [ In reply to ]
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Mark Lemmon wrote:
If you have already been diagnosed by a physician with a medical condition and have already asked the physician whether it is OK to train, then I think it's OK to ask on ST too. Most doctors I've dealt with who don't see a lot of endurance athletes are reluctant to opine when I ask them about training with non-life-threatening medical conditions. People on this forum, including M.D.s, have experiences and expertise that you likely won't get from your treating physicians.

+1.

Doctors always say to stop training just because there is a minute chance it could worsen the situation...even when paying careful attention to your body would enable you to detect this before damage is done. They have to advise you based on the percentages.

For example, I was VERY careful and went back to the weight room 4 days after a hernia surgery. Even did very, very light squats the 3rd day (day 6) and all was fine. I was smart and careful and observant.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [jyeager] [ In reply to ]
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I'll respectfully take you to task on this one Sir.

To me, it's a simple equation: Downside risk vs. upside benefit.

And since you volunteered an example from your own experience, I'll take the liberty of extrapolating your example down a different outcome.

You had good luck- or you made your own good luck through good fitness and reasonable judgement. Problem is, not everyone is as wise.

Here is what the downside may have looked like: 4 days after your hernia surgery you go back to the weight room. Your initial experience is good so you "test" a little higher- just a little. Wham- the thing lets loose. Another hernia. Back to the drawing board.

It didn't happen- but that real possibility existed. Now, on the flip side- was the benefit of getting back into the weight room commensurate with the downside exposure? I can't answer that for you- only you can. I will suggest there was significant attendant risk. It's an individual decision as to whether it is worth it for you.

Now, with life threatening stuff- I'll strongly suggest erring on the side of safety is the obvious wisdom.


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
Last edited by: Tom Demerly: Jan 24, 11 12:43
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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Tom Demerly wrote:
I'll respectfully take you to task on this one Sir.

To me, it's a simple equation: Downside risk vs. upside benefit.

And since you volunteered an example from your own experience, I'll take the liberty of extrapolating your example down a different outcome.

You had good luck- or you made your own good luck through good fitness and reasonable judgement. Problem is, not everyone is as wise.

Here is what the downside may have looked like: 4 days after your hernis aurgery you go back to the weight room. Your initial experience is good so you "test" a little higher- just a little. Wham- the thing lets loose. Another hernia. Back to the drawing board.

It didn't happen- but that real possibility existed. Now, on the flip side- was the benefit of getting back into the weight room commensurate with the downside exposure? I can't answer that for you- only you can. I will suggest there was significant attendant risk. It's an individual decision as to whether it is worth it for you.

Now, with life threatening stuff- I'll strongly suggest erring on the side of safety is the obvious wisdom.

Agreed. I suppose that I was uniquely equipped to have done this (or just think I am and was lucky).
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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I posted I was having a headache on this forum.

I remember this. I believe it was entitled "Migraine headache-colour me impressed" or something to that effect. You did a pretty accurate job of describing migraines, which have a lot of the same symptoms of CVA's. Of course, you are a young man, very fit, generally healthy...to me, the diagnosis of stroke would have been highly unlikely, unless we knew about your congenital defect which really kind of made it all clear. I can even remember thinking that your symptoms sounded stroke-like but was satisfied that if you thought you were having a migraine that I could believe it, because you are a generally competent person who understands your health and the "feel" of your body. On a professional level, as a paramedic, I would have treated you as if you were having a stroke based on your symptoms.

At the same time, you were not (at least as I recall) trying to ask if you should train. It seemed to me that you were pretty debillitated by the headache. You probably could have justified a trip to the ER just for some meds for that (and then they would have...maybe...determined you were having a stroke). Many people, and you may have been one of them, hesitate going to the ER because of the cost. Insurance is a huge issue, and a neuro workup is not cheap, as I'm sure you discovered.

My experience with Slowtwitch and asking medical advice has been mixed. The one time that I did ask a question, it was about a rash and swelling that I had on my face. I truly had no idea what it was and I was worried. I didn't think it was life-threatening though. As it turns out it was poison ivy. Many of the people who responded though were fairly rude and said stuff like,"you shouldn't be asking this sort of question, you should just go to the doctor." Fair enough. But it was a Sunday, the doctor isn't open until the next day, I didn't think an ER visit was warranted, and I really was thinking that I would use the collective intelligence here to see if anyone (particularly one of the physicians) had ever seen anything like that. I was fortunate that someone did ease my mind on that post and said that it looked like a poison ivy reaction (albeit a bad one) and that I would be fine waiting until the next day. That's all I needed to hear.

I agree with your general sentiment though. Most people here are insane and think they can train through anything (colds, asthma, broken bones, sprain, ruptures, etc.). SO they use this forum to hopefully find someone else who "did it" and went against the grain of reasonable medical advice. It sort of reminds me of the TLC show that is about these moonbat crazy women think it is OK and safe to have babies at home without any medical assistance. All it does is give other people the idea that this is reasonable.

Bernie

______________
"Slowbern has always made astute observations."-Casey 03/10/2009
2013-2014 Detroit Lions---13-3 until proved otherwise.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train?

Yes. Unless you are in the 30-34 age group. Anyone in that age group should not train under any circumstance.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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Men are just stupid about going to the dr. giant lump (tumor) no I'm ok . Bp medicine no thanks I'll fine after the stroke or heart attack. My wife likes vegetables. I read on ST I will be fine. Got great info from a bean counter . Knows all about the brain.

Thom

Slowtwitch bitchist place on planet earth
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [jyeager] [ In reply to ]
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Doctors rightfully stay on the cautions side of things. They get to see all kinds of idiots who screw things up.

I once had a doctor tell me "you only have a one in one hundred chance of this happening, but that doesn't help you any if you're that ONE, so do everything you can to not be that one... OK?"
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Tom Demerly] [ In reply to ]
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A couple of years ago YOU gave me the best advice I have ever gotten on Slowtwitch. "Be leary of medical advice from slowtwitchers."
Is it ok to get a general feel for ideas? probably. But I would not take medical advice too seriously.
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Re: Bi-fibular cardial malopathy with anterior malifscation of the greater oropasticum while undergoing amnio-ongonesis: Should I train? [Karl] [ In reply to ]
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About every two years I give good advice...


Tom Demerly
The Tri Shop.com
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