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trying to trim down a little before race season
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my race season starts in april with the texas half ironman.

i have a few pounds i want to shed. i float around 156 and ive been a little loose with my diet since september of last year. i decided i want to shed maybe 3 or 4 pounds and get my fat percentage down, if for no other reason to get my super trim look back. its kinda amazing what a few pounds will do to that.

is it a horribly bad idea to try and stay 100-200 calories deficient daily to try and trim a little fat while also training and prepping for race season?

2018 Schedule: Texas Half Ironman April 8 // Tri Cap Tex, May 28 // Cypress, TX Sprint July 29 // Kemah, TX Olympic October 21
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Re: trying to trim down a little before race season [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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Not if you can execute your workouts just as effectively as if you were consuming those calories. If you experience a decline in ability to execute the prescribed workouts as a result of lack in energy then you have to decide where you're going to find the bigger effect. Training or weightloss. When discussing 3-4lbs I'm inclined to say training is more important than the weightloss. I'm also inclined to think that 100-200 calories isn't going to make much of a difference and with your workouts over the next few months you'll see the desired effect without losing the workout quality.
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Re: trying to trim down a little before race season [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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Hello damon.lebeouf and All,

http://www.businessinsider.com/...ld-slow-aging-2018-1

Excerpt:

Most research indicates that the people who live longest and stay healthy tend to eat a largely plant-based pescatarian diet that's relatively low in protein. Longo thinks this is ideal — a mostly vegan and fish-based lifestyle, though one in which moderate consumption of wine and coffee are permitted.

For someone in good health who is eating like this and getting regular exercise, he thinks the FMD might be beneficial to do twice a year.

For healthy people eating a more "normal" diet, he wrote that the FMD might be beneficial once every four or five months. People with at least two risk factors for cancer, diabetes, or heart disease who are overweight could consider doing the FMD once a month, Longo says."

THE FASTING-MIMICKING DIET

People on the FMD eat normally for 25 days, but the five-day fast portion is no joke.

On those days, participants eat a specific blend of nutrients that amount to 1,100 calories on the first day and 800 calories per day on days two through five.

Nutritionally, most of these calories come from complex carbohydrates (like vegetables), healthy fats (olive oil), and plant-based protein (from nuts).

Although it's still far too early to say whether doing the FMD every so often will actually prolong life in the long term, the basic idea is appealing. Fasting is known to trigger physical changes that seem to be associated with longer life and disease prevention. Early clinical trials indicate that restricting calorie intake seems to trigger similarly promising physical changes in people, which is why it's sometimes discussed as a potential anti-aging intervention.

"The diet itself is remarkably simple.

For five consecutive days each month, participants drastically limit their caloric intake (hence, "fasting mimicking") by up to two-thirds. The first day they'd consume 1,090 calories (10% protein, 56% fat, 34% carbohydrate), and for days two through five they'd consume just 725 calories (9% protein, 44% fat, 47% carbohydrate). Most of those carbohydrates came in the form of vegetables.

That's not easy. Bowes writes that many participants experienced profound headaches and dehydration. Mentally, he says he alternated between exhaustion and an alert sense of clear-mindedness.

But for the remaining 25 days of the month, study participants ate whatever they normally would.

Researchers have long been fascinated by the health benefits associated with temporary fasting — the idea behind this diet is to get those benefits without having to do something quite so drastic."

https://academic.oup.com/...ticle/73/1/1/4733393

https://academic.oup.com/...ticle/73/1/4/3834057


Excerpt:


"The CALERIE trial randomized N = 220 nonobese adults to 25% caloric restriction (n = 145; 11.7% caloric restriction was achieved, on average) or to maintain current diet (n = 75) for 2 years. We analyzed biomarker data collected at baseline, 12-, and 24-month follow-up assessments. We applied published biomarker algorithms to these data to calculate two biological age measures, Klemera–Doubal Method Biological Age and homeostatic dysregulation. Intent-to-treat analysis using mixed-effects growth models of within-person change over time tested if caloric restriction slowed increase in measures of biological aging across follow-up. Analyses of both measures indicated caloric restriction slowed biological aging. Weight loss did not account for the observed effects. Results suggest future directions for testing of geroprotective therapies in humans."

Cheers, Neal

+1 mph Faster
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Re: trying to trim down a little before race season [damon.lebeouf] [ In reply to ]
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I just recommended this book to another poster about 5min ago. Power Eating by Susan Kleiner. Your local library will have a copy or you can probably pick up an older edition for pretty cheap online. It's a really great reference to have.
100 to 200 kcal will probably be unnoticeable to you. Do you really have intake vs expenditure that finely formulated? Good for you if you do! That's really the secret to maintaining body composition.
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