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Should I get a coach
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New to triathlons (January) have done a sprint, oly, and doing a Half next month. Now all these have been done here in south texas, so I'm used to the heat, the "hills", and the lake temps. The question is mainly cause I'm learning this as I go and have signed up for lake placid 2018, which is NOTHING like south texas. So this will have real hills (mtns), cold water, elevation higher than 600 ft. What says you all? Thanks
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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Yes. I have never regretted having a coach to guide me through a training program and push me more than I could push myself.
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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-also if the answer is "yes" should it be a texas coach? I've seen a handful but there resumes are southern races.
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Re: Should I get a coach [nickwhite] [ In reply to ]
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nickwhite wrote:
Yes. I have never regretted having a coach to guide me through a training program and push me more than I could push myself.

And, IMO, there is the key. If you need someone to push you, great, spend the money. For me, I do 3 hours a day. I do not need any pushing. I will save my money for that bike fit. :)

Dave Campbell | Facebook | @DaveECampbell | h2ofun@h2ofun.net

Boom Nutrition code 19F4Y3 $5 off 24 pack box | Bionic Runner | PowerCranks | Velotron | Spruzzamist

Lions don't lose sleep worrying about the sheep
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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I think having a coach is a personal preference thing. I like having one, my husband self trains.


I successfully self-trained for years, but had an event come up that I felt was a bit more than I could get myself through and hired a coach for it. Three years later we're still working together. I like the structure that he brings to my training and not having to think about what I need to do and when. One of the reasons I chose my coach is that, like me, he has a diversified background (SBR, road, mountain bike, CX) and has been able to get me though whatever crazy idea I come up with. He's also a friend, which works for us as he already knew my background and I knew his.

brosemail - my coach lives in central Texas. If you're interested in more information, PM me.

Try not to drown / rock the bike / hobby-jog
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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there are a lot of coach's throughout Texas (san Antonio, Austin, houston etc.) my thing is if the event was here in TX I would definitely self train, but its not it will be in an area unlike the areas I'm used to. I know I've read "
you should do one that you are familiar with" but I wanted it to be a "big" one, like KONA and I know I'm not going to get selected for that one, ha-ha. so I figured lake placid would be the one, but after I signed up for it I started reading the bike portion, the run and started thinking " I might need a coach, but If so I would need one that is familiar with this type of race, and knows how to train someone that doesn't have hills/mountains etc." maybe its just the newbie in me that has this "rookie" question, but I also think " I will cross that line and have my name called, just want to be running across the finish line instead of crawling". thanks again for any help
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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brosemail wrote:
I might need a coach, but If so I would need one that is familiar with this type of race, and knows how to train someone that doesn't have hills/mountains etc."

I suggest talking to different coaches: local, on-line, local tri club and see if you 'click'.

As for a flat lander training for a race with elevation, it can be done. Just be ready for some good old-fashioned intensity workouts.

Try not to drown / rock the bike / hobby-jog
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.

You're such a Trump ball washer! - Duffy - Feb 8, 17 13:18
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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If you do, inquire about the trucker hat policy, right up front

I left the only woman I ever loved in a strip bar in Cleveland
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Re: Should I get a coach [Sanuk] [ In reply to ]
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Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.

Most folks I know are looking for an easy out. When I ask them about consistency, frequency, duration, I generally get a blank stare. I pretty much see a direct link between how much folks train, and this is all year long, compared to results. (Assuming they have the right parents to start with). A coach I guess for many is just like they parents bugging them to clean their rooms.

Dave Campbell | Facebook | @DaveECampbell | h2ofun@h2ofun.net

Boom Nutrition code 19F4Y3 $5 off 24 pack box | Bionic Runner | PowerCranks | Velotron | Spruzzamist

Lions don't lose sleep worrying about the sheep
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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Unfortunately the answer is probably, it depends. What are your goals? Are you hoping to just finish? There are a lot of canned plans that can get you there. Are you looking for some accountability? A coach can help. Are you looking to get as much out of yourself as possible? A coach is probably a good idea.

I've had both online and local coaches and actually had the most success with online coaches. PM me if you'd like a few recommendations. If you decide to go the route of a coach the important thing is to find someone that you can work well with and someone who will take the time to understand your goals and come up with a roadmap that will get you there.
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Re: Should I get a coach [Sanuk] [ In reply to ]
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I disagree. As a coach, most of the time its the other way around. Beginners need guidance more than experienced triathletes. Sure this can be situational, but in my experience most beginners have NO IDEA where to start and how to do everything at an appropriate level.


Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.

Inside The Big Ring Podcast

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Re: Should I get a coach [Brandes] [ In reply to ]
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Well that's why I'm here, I've been getting my training programs from "online free programs" 5 days a week I'm doing 2 a days, but am the only person I know in my small town doing tri training. I am part of a tri club in nearby town (45min away) but due to work and family I'm lucky to attend their events maybe twice a month. So maybe having a coach could help me finish IMLP running across the finish line with a smile on my face.
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Re: Should I get a coach [Brandes] [ In reply to ]
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I have recently hired a coach and it has proved to be a great idea so far.

I used to coach high school and college Ice Hockey. I was also a college hockey player. I know how to train...but I also know what I DON'T KNOW. Having a triathlon coach to guide me through everything is so much more efficient than trying to do everything myself.



Brandes wrote:
I disagree. As a coach, most of the time its the other way around. Beginners need guidance more than experienced triathletes. Sure this can be situational, but in my experience most beginners have NO IDEA where to start and how to do everything at an appropriate level.


Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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brosemail wrote:
New to triathlons (January) have done a sprint, oly, and doing a Half next month. Now all these have been done here in south texas, so I'm used to the heat, the "hills", and the lake temps. The question is mainly cause I'm learning this as I go and have signed up for lake placid 2018, which is NOTHING like south texas. So this will have real hills (mtns), cold water, elevation higher than 600 ft. What says you all? Thanks

I'm doing my first full in less than 2 weeks. Had previously done 4 HIMs, bunch of oly and sprints. I decided for my first (potentially only full IM) to hire a coach. Best money I've spent. As self-trained, I was always pretty consistent with my workouts and my race times were decent (slow by slowtwitch standards ;). But with a coach, I just follow the plan, discuss with her how I feel to make sure I'm not overtraining, and discuss how I'm progressing. I've had PRs at sprint, oly, and HIM distance this year.
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Re: Should I get a coach [h2ofun] [ In reply to ]
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h2ofun wrote:
Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.


Most folks I know are looking for an easy out. When I ask them about consistency, frequency, duration, I generally get a blank stare. I pretty much see a direct link between how much folks train, and this is all year long, compared to results. (Assuming they have the right parents to start with). A coach I guess for many is just like they parents bugging them to clean their rooms.

Really not helpful. Seriously.

____________________________________
Swimming Workout of the Day: http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ost=5784860#5784860;
Favourite Swim Sets: http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...m.cgi?;post=5004659;
Winner of the 2017 50 fly east coast Smackdown. http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ost=6294538#p6294538
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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Personally, assuming everything else is similar - I'd probably favor a coach who is experienced training people *from* flat hot south Texas for races *in* cooler hilly Lake Placid.

Your locality maybe makes it impossible to do long rides in the afternoon at anything approaching high intensity for example. A local coach will be slightly more accustomed to dealing with that sort of thing. And if that local coach has been around a while, they have already worked with people getting ready for Lake Placid.

A coach in western North Carolina or Idaho might have lots of experience helping people get ready for hilly races but not be accustomed to dealing with the day in and day out of South Texas heat and terrain.

On the whole, I'd consider it a relatively small issue though. If you find a coach you trust and are comfortable with - I'd say that's the main thing.
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Re: Should I get a coach [JasoninHalifax] [ In reply to ]
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JasoninHalifax wrote:
h2ofun wrote:
Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.


Most folks I know are looking for an easy out. When I ask them about consistency, frequency, duration, I generally get a blank stare. I pretty much see a direct link between how much folks train, and this is all year long, compared to results. (Assuming they have the right parents to start with). A coach I guess for many is just like they parents bugging them to clean their rooms.


Really not helpful. Seriously.

IMO, most coaches for most athletes is just a money grab, plan and simple. They prey on folks fears. Nothing wrong with that, just not getting my money. I do pretty well with my hobby on my own, and get my "coaching" inputs from ST. :)

Dave Campbell | Facebook | @DaveECampbell | h2ofun@h2ofun.net

Boom Nutrition code 19F4Y3 $5 off 24 pack box | Bionic Runner | PowerCranks | Velotron | Spruzzamist

Lions don't lose sleep worrying about the sheep
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Re: Should I get a coach [h2ofun] [ In reply to ]
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h2ofun wrote:
JasoninHalifax wrote:
h2ofun wrote:
Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.


Most folks I know are looking for an easy out. When I ask them about consistency, frequency, duration, I generally get a blank stare. I pretty much see a direct link between how much folks train, and this is all year long, compared to results. (Assuming they have the right parents to start with). A coach I guess for many is just like they parents bugging them to clean their rooms.


Really not helpful. Seriously.


IMO, most coaches for most athletes is just a money grab, plan and simple. They prey on folks fears. Nothing wrong with that, just not getting my money. I do pretty well with my hobby on my own, and get my "coaching" inputs from ST. :)

Still not helpful. You've been doing this a long time, and you treat the sport as a hobby. So what works for you (and me, TBH) is that we don't get a lot out of a formal coach / athlete relationship.

When I was a lot younger, I had several coaches, probably 10-12 different coaches over the course of my swimming career, which lasted 8 years (age 14-22). Now, as a masters swimmer I have 3 coaches*, but it is much less intensive than in the past. In fact, no-one swims at a serious level without a coach. Not Michael Phelps, not a lowly age-grouper. Everyone has a coach, and it isn't necessarily to do with motivation. There is substantial knowledge that a good coach has that you would never get on your own, no matter how many books you read or forums you frequent. So I learned a lot about the sport, and training in general, from those coaches.

Someone new to the sport doesn't have those years of experience, so they can take years to accumulate it, and maybe never get it. Or, they can use a coach's services to help them learn. Its not about "most coaches" for "most athletes". It is about whether this particular athlete could benefit from good coaching.

* it's not really a true coaching relationship, but they do give me some technical feedback and write the masters workouts.

____________________________________
Swimming Workout of the Day: http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ost=5784860#5784860;
Favourite Swim Sets: http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...m.cgi?;post=5004659;
Winner of the 2017 50 fly east coast Smackdown. http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ost=6294538#p6294538
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Re: Should I get a coach [JasoninHalifax] [ In reply to ]
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JasoninHalifax wrote:
h2ofun wrote:
JasoninHalifax wrote:
h2ofun wrote:
Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.


Most folks I know are looking for an easy out. When I ask them about consistency, frequency, duration, I generally get a blank stare. I pretty much see a direct link between how much folks train, and this is all year long, compared to results. (Assuming they have the right parents to start with). A coach I guess for many is just like they parents bugging them to clean their rooms.


Really not helpful. Seriously.


IMO, most coaches for most athletes is just a money grab, plan and simple. They prey on folks fears. Nothing wrong with that, just not getting my money. I do pretty well with my hobby on my own, and get my "coaching" inputs from ST. :)


Still not helpful. You've been doing this a long time, and you treat the sport as a hobby. So what works for you (and me, TBH) is that we don't get a lot out of a formal coach / athlete relationship.

When I was a lot younger, I had several coaches, probably 10-12 different coaches over the course of my swimming career, which lasted 8 years (age 14-22). Now, as a masters swimmer I have 3 coaches*, but it is much less intensive than in the past. In fact, no-one swims at a serious level without a coach. Not Michael Phelps, not a lowly age-grouper. Everyone has a coach, and it isn't necessarily to do with motivation. There is substantial knowledge that a good coach has that you would never get on your own, no matter how many books you read or forums you frequent. So I learned a lot about the sport, and training in general, from those coaches.

Someone new to the sport doesn't have those years of experience, so they can take years to accumulate it, and maybe never get it. Or, they can use a coach's services to help them learn. Its not about "most coaches" for "most athletes". It is about whether this particular athlete could benefit from good coaching.

* it's not really a true coaching relationship, but they do give me some technical feedback and write the masters workouts.

There are lots of ways to get "coaching" for free.

Join a tri club. Read stuff on the internet from place like ST.

I love to talk to new folks and give them idea. I just laugh at a lot of the stuff I hear they have a "coach" give them.

I just strongly feel most coaches for most people is a total waste of money. But, they are lots on things in life I feel is a waste of money. And probably a lot
of things I spend money on that most think is a waste.

Person asks a question, and they have the right to hear inputs from all sides. Some believe coaches are great, but for what, to be MOP at best?
For 99.9% of athletes, this sport IS a hobby. I have yet to talk to anyone in my 20 years of racing that puts food on the table, or a roof over their head
from racing triathlons.

If someone wants to spend the money, great, go for it. I will probably consider paying for a bike fit, even though IMO, I would be shocked if it really does anything for my bike times, I just do not have the engine, and I have no issues with that.

Dave Campbell | Facebook | @DaveECampbell | h2ofun@h2ofun.net

Boom Nutrition code 19F4Y3 $5 off 24 pack box | Bionic Runner | PowerCranks | Velotron | Spruzzamist

Lions don't lose sleep worrying about the sheep
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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Long story short, your own situation should dictate whether you get a coach or not. I don't think it's a controversial thing to say that a good coach will make you faster, but it's an investment in time and resources to find a good coach, pay that good coach a not insubstantial fee, and be wiling to work and listen to that coach. My thought would be that once you get to a point where you enjoy the sport and want to push yourself, know you have the time to commit yourself, are mature enough to know how you can make the most of the coaching relationship, and have the disposable income where it's not an issue, you should definitely consider whether getting a coach fits what you want.

Speaking from an N=1 perspective, I worked with the same coach for nearly 4.5 years (paying a generous student rate for his services) and got the most I could from what I put into training. That said, when I finally got out of grad school at the tender age of 28 and hit the real working world, it made no sense to have a coach because I sunk myself into learning my profession for a couple of years and barely had time to get a half hour of exercise (not training) in daily. Fast forward to now, and I'm getting back into things slowly, scrapping together 4 then 6 then 8 hours/week and enjoying tri again as recreational hobby. If I find myself able to dedicate the 10+ hours a week I need to make it a high-level competitive hobby again, I absolutely will (now that I have the benefit/curse of having more disposable income than time).

Because it's worth reiterating on its, DO YOUR DUE DILIGENCE when finding a coach. Never dealt with a bad coaching situation, but are aware that there are "coaches" out there who are more than willing to take your money for a half-baked off-the-rack training plan they stole from somewhere else.
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Re: Should I get a coach [RandMart] [ In reply to ]
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RandMart wrote:
If you do, inquire about the trucker hat policy, right up front

If you're going to reply to a thread where someone is asking for help, at least try to be helpful.

"One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time."
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Re: Should I get a coach [splatt] [ In reply to ]
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splatt wrote:
RandMart wrote:
If you do, inquire about the trucker hat policy, right up front


If you're going to reply to a thread where someone is asking for help, at least try to be helpful.

That is extremely helpful. Wouldn't want to hire a coach only to get fired by said coach for not wearing the required trucker hat.

____________________________________
Swimming Workout of the Day: http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ost=5784860#5784860;
Favourite Swim Sets: http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...m.cgi?;post=5004659;
Winner of the 2017 50 fly east coast Smackdown. http://forum.slowtwitch.com/...ost=6294538#p6294538
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Re: Should I get a coach [brosemail] [ In reply to ]
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I wouldn't get a coach if your reason is not having big hills in your area. The only thing you won't be able to train for is the long downhill at IMLP, you can easily train for the uphills in TX. Getting used to the high speed descent is something that you will only learn how to do by riding down big hills/mountains, a coach isn't going to be much benefit there.

That said, if you have the money to spend and don't have the time/desire to create your own training plans or you need someone to hold you accountable, then get a coach. Many coaches just give out cookie cutter training plans, stuff you can find yourself online/books and simply make some adjustments to fit your own needs but that takes some time and if you don't have the time then a coach may be something to consider. IMO anyway.
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Re: Should I get a coach [h2ofun] [ In reply to ]
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h2ofun wrote:
JasoninHalifax wrote:
h2ofun wrote:
JasoninHalifax wrote:
h2ofun wrote:
Sanuk wrote:
I think people go to a coach too early. There is a lot you can accomplish by simply running, biking and swimming consistently. Once you feel you can't progress anymore, then you can get a coach.


Most folks I know are looking for an easy out. When I ask them about consistency, frequency, duration, I generally get a blank stare. I pretty much see a direct link between how much folks train, and this is all year long, compared to results. (Assuming they have the right parents to start with). A coach I guess for many is just like they parents bugging them to clean their rooms.


Really not helpful. Seriously.


IMO, most coaches for most athletes is just a money grab, plan and simple. They prey on folks fears. Nothing wrong with that, just not getting my money. I do pretty well with my hobby on my own, and get my "coaching" inputs from ST. :)


Still not helpful. You've been doing this a long time, and you treat the sport as a hobby. So what works for you (and me, TBH) is that we don't get a lot out of a formal coach / athlete relationship.

When I was a lot younger, I had several coaches, probably 10-12 different coaches over the course of my swimming career, which lasted 8 years (age 14-22). Now, as a masters swimmer I have 3 coaches*, but it is much less intensive than in the past. In fact, no-one swims at a serious level without a coach. Not Michael Phelps, not a lowly age-grouper. Everyone has a coach, and it isn't necessarily to do with motivation. There is substantial knowledge that a good coach has that you would never get on your own, no matter how many books you read or forums you frequent. So I learned a lot about the sport, and training in general, from those coaches.

Someone new to the sport doesn't have those years of experience, so they can take years to accumulate it, and maybe never get it. Or, they can use a coach's services to help them learn. Its not about "most coaches" for "most athletes". It is about whether this particular athlete could benefit from good coaching.

* it's not really a true coaching relationship, but they do give me some technical feedback and write the masters workouts.


There are lots of ways to get "coaching" for free.

Join a tri club. Read stuff on the internet from place like ST.

I love to talk to new folks and give them idea. I just laugh at a lot of the stuff I hear they have a "coach" give them.

I just strongly feel most coaches for most people is a total waste of money. But, they are lots on things in life I feel is a waste of money. And probably a lot
of things I spend money on that most think is a waste.

Person asks a question, and they have the right to hear inputs from all sides. Some believe coaches are great, but for what, to be MOP at best?
For 99.9% of athletes, this sport IS a hobby. I have yet to talk to anyone in my 20 years of racing that puts food on the table, or a roof over their head
from racing triathlons.

If someone wants to spend the money, great, go for it. I will probably consider paying for a bike fit, even though IMO, I would be shocked if it really does anything for my bike times, I just do not have the engine, and I have no issues with that.

So it's safe to assume that you're never going to be coached, but let me speak to the others on the thread about my perception of what it is that I do. Simply put, we take all of the noise and all of the clutter that is the magazines, blogs, advice from the pros, advice from Joe Triathlete, ST Forums, etc. and put it in a concise format that is individualized to the specific athlete and is easy to understand and execute.

Sure you can learn Physics at a PhD level from reading textbooks, journals, or going to theflatearthsociety.org (yes it's a real thing...), but studying under the tutelage of someone who can guide you on what is valuable and what is noise saves both time and energy.

USA Triathlon Level 2 Coach
Slowtwitch Master Coach
Head Coach, TriCoach Colorado, LLC
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