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Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting

 

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JTK28

May 4, 13 8:20

Post #1 of 47 (3164 views)
Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting Quote | Reply

Just wanted to get some opinions.

Personally, i prefer the mechanical shifting.

As slick as the new electronic options are, i'm still wary of the possibility (no matter how slim) of circuitry failure.

I'm also a bit of a traditionalist...


TonyStark

May 4, 13 8:29

Post #2 of 47 (3150 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I've had plenty of cables snap miles away from home. It's easy for me to say mechanical rules because I can't afford Di2
-----------------
Dale Stephanos (Formerly PappaD)



BCDon

May 4, 13 8:36

Post #3 of 47 (3136 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I'm more worried about "circuitry failure" on my car, the planes I go on, the pacemaker in the other driver's chest etc.

I can't afford EPS but I fondled it on a bike a few weeks ago and I'd ride with it in a heartbeat.
BC Don
Pain is temporary, not giving it your all lasts all Winter.


tigermilk

May 4, 13 8:50

Post #4 of 47 (3114 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [PappaD] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

PappaD wrote:
I've had plenty of cables snap miles away from home. It's easy for me to say mechanical rules because I can't afford Di2
In over 100k miles of riding, not once have I had a cable break on me, even ones that had a nice coating of rust caused by my sweat. I've never seen it on group rides or races either. However, several folks I ride with have electric shifting, and at least 3 times in the last year the batteries died and they were stuck in gear. Also, doesn't the shimano system still have a cable to pull the derailleur? It's not a torque motor pivoting the derailleur. So a cable can still break.


GMAN19030

May 4, 13 9:04

Post #5 of 47 (3098 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I have been riding Di2 since April 2011. It has worked flawlessly. I can't imagine going back to mechanical. Ui2, while still pricey, is a pretty attractive option when compared to Di2 and only slightly more expensive than a SRAM Red groupset.


@Dynomitedad

May 4, 13 9:11

Post #6 of 47 (3085 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I'm workn on an S5 purchase... I gave a lot of consideration to this question... Don at ATC is even giving me a killer deal on DA Di2 (last years) vs the new 9000 (11 speed). I'm going with mechanical 9000 ...Keep it simple.... and hey if we get a big EMP frying electronics, I can still ride my bike haha.


kdw

May 4, 13 10:20

Post #7 of 47 (3046 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [PappaD] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

"I've had plenty of cables snap miles away from home."

You are doing something wrong.



jeffp

May 4, 13 10:39

Post #8 of 47 (3034 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [tigermilk] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

well, my ultegra 6700 STI seems to like to chew through cables. 2 have broken thus far, but you get warning signs, such as barrel adjuster needing to be tightened frequently or needing to push Fd lever over eventhough nothing has changed. now neither has completely broken on the road, but when i get home teh cables are frayed significantly in or near the sti bodies


Rambler

May 4, 13 10:45

Post #9 of 47 (3023 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

On a $500 TT bike, I'm limited to mechanical, friction at that. Shifting doesn't seem like much of burden.


tigermilk

May 4, 13 10:54

Post #10 of 47 (3013 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [Rambler] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Rambler wrote:
On a $500 TT bike, I'm limited to mechanical, friction at that. Shifting doesn't seem like much of burden.
The best of all worlds. No issues with adjusting the cable with barrel adjusters, just trim on the fly and go. I actually prefer friction shifts on the TT bike.


pito00

May 4, 13 10:55

Post #11 of 47 (3013 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

On my road bike, with external cable routing, I don't mind changing out the cables at all, but my P2 is such a pain in the ass.


I dream of owning a bicycle that doesn't need me to spend a couple hours fishing derailleur and shifter cables through the frame ever again.

The idea of plumbing through a couple wires and some hydraulic lines once, then never needing to worry about adjustments ever again is very very appealing to me.
-------------------------------
Ignorance is bliss until they take your bliss away.


jackmott

May 4, 13 11:04

Post #12 of 47 (3002 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I am a futurist and nerd and love tech

and I prefer mech shifting.


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JTK28

May 4, 13 11:05

Post #13 of 47 (3000 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [tigermilk] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

tigermilk wrote:
at least 3 times in the last year the batteries died and they were stuck in gear


That's another concern i would have.


shoki

May 4, 13 12:09

Post #14 of 47 (2948 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Just to be the other one, I love my di2. But I use mech on my roadie also.
-shoki


ollie3856

May 4, 13 13:09

Post #15 of 47 (2890 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [tigermilk] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

no...no cables to break (other than the power cables)


ollie3856

May 4, 13 13:15

Post #16 of 47 (2886 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I have never even come close to running my battery down, not only do you get clear warnings at 50% and 25%, once your battery is almost out you'll still be able to make a few shifts on the rear before it locks up. If you manage to actually run your battery down to 0% you deserve to have to walk home. Am sure there are some cases of battery or connector failure, I have never had an issue, neither has anyone I know who runs Di2.
A lot of it is of course preference, and I much prefer electronic to manual shifting. Practically speaking, I think electronic shifting comes into it's own in road racing, where (in general) you'll find yourself shifting more often, and shifting under torque more often, Di2 (I run Ui2) provides completely flawless shifting in every situation I have put it in, I have also never dropped a chain (which is also pretty much inevitable if you race RRs or Crits) with Ui2.


gustavoaponte

May 13, 13 11:08

Post #17 of 47 (2612 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [ollie3856] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Ive been using de Di2 since september 2012, and from 3 rides 2 have problems with the electonic shift. I live in Colombia and Im not sure if is that we dont have the right people to install the electric shifting. Im giving them the last chance, and if not, Im going back to mechanical. I had my last IM in Cozumel last year in november, and lost power in the last 30 miles, It was a really bad time because of the wind.


Crash Master

May 13, 13 12:02

Post #18 of 47 (2533 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [gustavoaponte] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I've only used the Di2 for 3 TT's but I have to say it's brilliant, not exactly a long term test but the main benefits for me are:

1) Effortless changing gear - saves tiny bit of effort but more importantly not a jot of lost concentration
2) Front mech change is instant and great under load - never worry about loss of power or momentum
3) Looks super cool - and sounds great!
4) Smooth gear change - very slightly smoother than my mechanical set up

Of course nothing is really worth that sort of money after all it's just a bike, but if you have the cash to splash and you done all the important things then it's well worth it.





If you are sure you will fail, or convinced you will succeed, you are probably right.....


Shane_W

May 13, 13 12:07

Post #19 of 47 (2509 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I got electronic on one of my bikes and now have it on all of my bikes! I love it and would never go back to mechanical. It goes into gear perfectly and smoothly every single time, never drop a chain and if your battery dies, well, like someone else said - you deserve to walk home. Never goes out of adjustment and never have to worry about cable stretch. I have had zero issues with any of my bikes so I am certainly "pro" electronic shifting!


morey000

May 13, 13 12:12

Post #20 of 47 (2496 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [JTK28] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I've got 4000 miles on my Di2. It's been a pleasure.
The really beneficial part of it is having it on a TT bike so that you can shift from the bullhorns as well. Perhaps some of you stay in aero 100% of the time, but I use my bike for daily training and there's all sizes and shapes of hills that get me up on the horns or have me needing to have my hands near the brakes.

my roadie has "just" regular DA on it. It shifts fine. But I tend to ride my Di2 equipped bike- just because electronic shifting makes is that much more enjoyable.

yeah- it's ridiculously expensive. I concede that it may not be 'worth it' to everyone, but it's hard to deny that it's a wonderful luxury.


JAH294

May 13, 13 12:42

Post #21 of 47 (2439 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [morey000] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Agreed - my road bike has mechanical shifting on it and while I have no issues with it and love the bike, I got a new TT bike two weeks ago and have Di2 and love it so far.


andy tetmeyer

May 13, 13 15:25

Post #22 of 47 (2357 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [jeffp] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Jeff,
check your STI housing where it enters the shifter. The spiral wound wires under the plastic are probably exposed, they're sharp and pointy, and hard on the shifter cables.
Andy Tetmeyer (I work at HED)



LostNTransition

May 13, 13 16:06

Post #23 of 47 (2318 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [gustavoaponte] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

gustavoaponte wrote:
Ive been using de Di2 since september 2012, and from 3 rides 2 have problems with the electonic shift. I live in Colombia and Im not sure if is that we dont have the right people to install the electric shifting. Im giving them the last chance, and if not, Im going back to mechanical. I had my last IM in Cozumel last year in november, and lost power in the last 30 miles, It was a really bad time because of the wind.

3 rides in 8 months?


morey000

May 13, 13 17:03

Post #24 of 47 (2272 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [gustavoaponte] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

gustavoaponte wrote:
...., and lost power in the last 30 miles, It was a really bad time ....

I ride 150-200mi/wk, and charge my battery every month or three. I don't really keep track. But- I've never seen the 50% red light come on.
the Di2 battery lasts a LONG time. At least a 1000 mi, if not 3000 I think (not sure).

I guess it's possible to have a 'bad' battery tho'.


slatett

May 13, 13 17:56

Post #25 of 47 (2228 views)
Re: Mechanical vs Electrical Shifting [morey000] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

40 miles on my Campy EPS SR .. I would say it is much more efficient than mechanical, I like that I have the ability to switch multiple gears at once .. not sure it is faster than mechanical

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Winter stationary bike training
Will you use a stationary trainer this winter, is it a smart (e.g., Kickr, Computrainer) or a dumb (typical mag or fluid) trainer, and do you already own it?
Smart, have it
Smart, intend to buy it
Dumb, have it
Dumb, intend to buy it
Won't be riding on a trainer