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Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy?

 

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D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 8:26

Post #101 of 179 (3487 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

klehner wrote:
D1TRAINER wrote:
I am all ears, or eyes in this case, show me some research that says strength training won't help.? I'm not saying a CF type workout in season or ever! But one that addresses core, balance, rotator cuff, gluts for knee health etc. Need is up to the person! Also, did anyone check to see if Mark Allen is really endorsing cross fit as a previous poster suggested. Ha ha.


Sigh.

ed Sci Sports Exerc.[/url] 1993 Aug;25(8):952-9.Dry-land resistance training for competitive swimming.
Tanaka H, Costill DL, Thomas R, Fink WJ, Widrick JJ.
Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306.
Abstract
To determine the value of dry-land resistance training on front crawl swimming performance, two groups of 12 intercollegiate male swimmers were equated based upon preswimming performance, swim power values, and stroke specialties. Throughout the 14 wk of their competitive swimming season, both swim training group (SWIM, N = 12) and combined swim and resistance training group (COMBO, N = 12) swam together 6 d a week. In addition, the COMBO engaged in a 8-wk resistance training program 3 d a week. The resistance training was intended to simulate the muscle and swimming actions employed during front crawl swimming. Both COMBO and SWIM had significant (P < 0.05) but similar power gains as measured on the biokinetic swim bench and during a tethered swim over the 14-wk period. No change in distance per stroke was observed throughout the course of this investigation. No significant differences were found between the groups in any of the swim power and swimming performance tests. In this investigation, dry-land resistance training did not improve swimming performance despite the fact that the COMBO was able to increase the resistance used during strength training by 25-35%. The lack of a positive transfer between dry-land strength gains and swimming propulsive force may be due to the specificity of training.



So all research has to be taken in context. I have done my own research with full documentation on the benefits of strength work by swimmers, runners etc.. We can all agree that you can find some research from all angles, supporting one claim or another. In this case swimming was the focus. Anyone with half a brain knows that swimming is about technique, less about overall power or strength, although both improved would lead to better splits in the water.

When (most) people talk about strength they think of squats, presses etc. When I set up a program for a swimmer it includes these, some of the time. In my experience, the greatest improvement I have seen in swimmers is, when I focus my strength programs on shoulder stabilizing moves. (Improving the function of the scapula and also improving the strength of the rotator cuff and shoulders in general. This provides for better shoulder health and more compression/ slash stability = more power and consistency in the water. My wife was an all American and national level swimmer in college who can attest to the improvements. (as can the 1000's of swimmers I have worked with over the years) At the base level a pre-hab strength plan can keep a swimmer in the water injury free. The added strength and stability to the shoulder will lead to more efficiency over all distances.
I see the research and agree with "their finding's", for their research. Remember it's all about the individual program and how it's applied!
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(This post was edited by D1TRAINER on Feb 3, 11 8:38)


klehner

Feb 3, 11 8:36

Post #102 of 179 (3475 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
klehner wrote:
D1TRAINER wrote:
I am all ears, or eyes in this case, show me some research that says strength training won't help.? I'm not saying a CF type workout in season or ever! But one that addresses core, balance, rotator cuff, gluts for knee health etc. Need is up to the person! Also, did anyone check to see if Mark Allen is really endorsing cross fit as a previous poster suggested. Ha ha.


Sigh.

ed Sci Sports Exerc.[/url] 1993 Aug;25(8):952-9.Dry-land resistance training for competitive swimming.
Tanaka H, Costill DL, Thomas R, Fink WJ, Widrick JJ.
Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306.
Abstract
To determine the value of dry-land resistance training on front crawl swimming performance, two groups of 12 intercollegiate male swimmers were equated based upon preswimming performance, swim power values, and stroke specialties. Throughout the 14 wk of their competitive swimming season, both swim training group (SWIM, N = 12) and combined swim and resistance training group (COMBO, N = 12) swam together 6 d a week. In addition, the COMBO engaged in a 8-wk resistance training program 3 d a week. The resistance training was intended to simulate the muscle and swimming actions employed during front crawl swimming. Both COMBO and SWIM had significant (P < 0.05) but similar power gains as measured on the biokinetic swim bench and during a tethered swim over the 14-wk period. No change in distance per stroke was observed throughout the course of this investigation. No significant differences were found between the groups in any of the swim power and swimming performance tests. In this investigation, dry-land resistance training did not improve swimming performance despite the fact that the COMBO was able to increase the resistance used during strength training by 25-35%. The lack of a positive transfer between dry-land strength gains and swimming propulsive force may be due to the specificity of training.



So all research has to be taken in context. I have done my own research with full documentation on the benefits of strength work by swimmers, runners etc.. We can all agree that you can find some research from all angles, supporting one claim or another. In this case swimming was the focus.

That's great. Can you provide a link to your published research? Thanks.

Failing that, please show us some published research that shows that strength training benefits swimming performance. Then, maybe we can all agree.

So, first you asked for "some research that says strength training won't help." When I did so, you amended your request to exclude swimming because, well, swimming isn't about raw power, it's about technique (and even then you disputed the results of Costill's study, which showed that despite increased strength the swimmers didn't get any faster.) What's your response to the myriad of studies showing increased strength didn't improve endurance cycling? "Well, anyone with half a brain knows that cycling is about endurance?"
----------------------------------
Of course, with your ears stuffed with outrage cotton balls, all you heard was, rahrahra, govt comes to get your guns, rhahrahrah, stamp out your FREEEEEDOM! - slowguy


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 8:48

Post #103 of 179 (3458 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I didn't amend it. Just became more specific. I have not been published nor have I tried, if you exclude my personal experience, that is your choice! Remember I am saying that strength with a planned out endurance plan will help performance, I am not endorsing CF belief that you should substitute it for running, riding etc.


M~

Feb 3, 11 8:56

Post #104 of 179 (3449 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
I didn't amend it. Just became more specific. I have not been published nor have I tried, if you exclude my personal experience, that is your choice! Remember I am saying that strength with a planned out endurance plan will help performance, I am not endorsing CF belief that you should substitute it for running, riding etc.

So how would you go about measuring your results with someone who improved using your strength program with that same person had they not used the program? How do you know their improvements had nothing to do with your strength/resistance regimen.
It's pretty hard to be neutral and look at the data objectively when you are basing it completely on "personal experience".


klehner

Feb 3, 11 8:56

Post #105 of 179 (3449 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
I didn't amend it. Just became more specific.

Ah, okay.


Quote:
Remember I am saying that strength with a planned out endurance plan will help performance

Costill and his study say otherwise, but they have published data to back up their claim. Oh, right, swimming doesn't count, I forgot.
----------------------------------
Of course, with your ears stuffed with outrage cotton balls, all you heard was, rahrahra, govt comes to get your guns, rhahrahrah, stamp out your FREEEEEDOM! - slowguy


rugbysecondrow

Feb 3, 11 11:19

Post #106 of 179 (3398 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

This makes a good deal of sense. I have perused this thread, some good info and some ignorance and I think some of it needs to be separated out. My addition to throw on the top.

1st, I think there is a difference between a CF/CFE program guidlines and how that program is implemented. To draw an analogy, a tri program that utilizes longer sport specifc training might be a great program, but if the athlete doesn't get proper shoes, running technique, bike fit, pedal stroke work, swim fitness and flexibility, that athlete could hurt themselves. CFE could be harmful to an ignorant athlete just the same as the SBR programs, so I think we should not mix the program and the application of the program. Athletes have a responsibility to themselves to stay within their abilities and training.

2nd, goals of the athlete. For me, I have a Rugby back ground (having played for about 8 years) and started doing triathlons 4 years ago as recovery when I herniated two discs in my back and could no longer play. I am a 225# clyde who does alright, but is looking for improvement, combine that with the fact I have 2 small kids and busy work schedule that involves travel I need to fit it all in. CFE helps me work it all in. Will I be faster, I don't know. Will I be slower, I doubt it. I can say I feel stronger (core and legs) but not just in a power sense, but in a springy/nimble sense. I have taken kettlebell classes to learn proper technique (highely recommended by the way) and have become pretty good at pullups and jump rope, so I am not a meat head gym rat, just a bigger fella who likes to race triathlons.

3rd, I think many people in the SBR camp are anti anything new. In my limited experience, they are a pretty crowd following in they mindset and so I am not surprised they do not respond well to this. Is it CFE or the fact that CFE is very different from what they have always done? Many who have done CFE have also done the traditional SBR programs, but many who are SBR focused have not done CFE. I think their is much misinformation there and the lack of experience clouds their views. I also think they are intimidated by the strength and conditioning as this is very new to many who might not have that sort of background. This doesn't mean I am in favor of CFE for everyone (see point number 2) but that also doesn't mean I am against it for everyone.

4th, the arguement that CFE trains you for CFE and not for triathlons...huh? I do mainly Sprints with some Olympic and Exterra distances events. Most events have areas of hills, gap closing, recovery, technical etc...CFE has many intervals that train in sport specifc chosen ways (swim bike and run) that help power, speed, recovery, sustained effort. I can't speak to an IM or a HIM, but for a Sprint or an Olympic, one would be hard pressed to argue CFE is anti SBR. The Strength and conditioning are pretty straightforward and work well for me. I have a different background and I am quite a bit stronger than most triathletes, so maybe I am less intimidated by the workouts.

Lastly, don't take what I say as gospel. I am not a poseur, I am also not a top age grouper. I am a an athlete cross training from another sport, who enjoys working out and being fit, who enjoys triathlons and wants to improve. I am confident I will as I can feel a difference after only one month. I still do my long rides, I still ride fixed geared on hills in the winter, I still run hills for training, but I can say that I feel pretty strong compared to last year and I feel confident going into this season.

Cheers and thanks.

D1TRAINER wrote:
As someone with 25 yrs of training exp. I feel like I need to break this tie. Great reading by the way!

CF has a place in fitness only because Americans are fat and need to move. As far as I understand CF is considered so dangerous that insurance companies won't take them on as client's, they had to start their own fund. I don't know this to be fact, I have just been told by several brokers. Ryan is this true? If this is accurate, that is truly scary. Another danger is that most CF instructors do a weekend course to become certified, then proclaim themselves to be strength and fitness experts. It took me 12 yrs in the business to feel that had a clue.

I agree that a properly planned strength program can help all athletes, in all season's. That is a scientific fact.
CF workout's are super hard no question, but if thats all I need, I can go to 24 hour fitness and take a step class. The directors of CF are great at marketing a product! Thats another fact.

The 2 biggest problems are incompetent or under educated trainers (you guys are not CSCS, so stop calling yourself a strength coaches. Please.) Also, advising 40 and 50 year old people to do olympic lifts until they puke or pass out is just crazy. The impact CF will have on some people in the short run, fat loss, strength gains and sense of community, pail in comparison to the future orthopedic problems they will most likely suffer from.

To conclude- Endurance athletes need to lift and stay strong. A must! CF folks are fine, except when they put people in danger by telling them not to prepare for there chosen sport. I can wrestle pigs to get ready for a half too, but is that is what is best for my health, no. Racing for 3, 4 let alone 13 hrs is dangerous, the body needs to do the activities to get the proper cellular development, you know mitochondria development and capillary growth. These things won't happen doing cross fit. Well in truth, not near as much!
One can find so many better programs out there. CF is just well marketed.


(This post was edited by rugbysecondrow on Feb 3, 11 11:23)


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 11:46

Post #107 of 179 (3376 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [M~] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

A great question. Using the athletes feed back as to what they think has worked or not worked for them. Have they improved in body composition, stayed healthier and performed better. We can argue that it was just doing their sport that had them perform better. The science we apply today to strength and endurance training really has led us to a better understanding of what the benefits are. Lance Armstrong strength trains year round, so does Mr. Phelps does, as do the Kenyan national endurance teams, all of them.

I only argue that the way CF is designed is not scientifically correct. ACSM, NASM and most national strength and Fitness orgs. have come out against it. Or advised to hold off until further evidence is available.

As a former football player I used to train in the bigger, faster, stronger mantra that CF advocates. I am by experience, smarter and wiser now. I train hard, but with a true purpose. What these do is complete an Ironman in order to strengthen there ability to push the CF model. I have completed 6 Full Irons and 3 half irons, those don't qualify me as an expert nor qualified to disign or implement plans for others.


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 11:54

Post #108 of 179 (3369 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Swimming does count in my strength training point. I just question your understanding of what a strength program is. Are national teams in swimming, running and biking all strength train year round. The programs shift focuses depending where they are in their seasons!


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 12:13

Post #109 of 179 (3355 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Here is a nice link. http://www.pponline.co.uk/...-is-not-enough-40780

There are hundreds recent articles to support strength training in Multi sport. Citing a study done in 1993 is like saying we never came with antibiotics. The strength world has changed completely, the exercises we do are different what time a year we do them etc. Is all evidence based.

CF on the other hand is not. The study you touched on would be valid when referencing CF. This is because there programs that come out of the 70's and 80's. Again CF has a great community feel and they get some people moving who would not on their own. These are good things. The rest of it is just about making money. At what cost to peoples joints and quality of life later.
There are safer, more effective programs out there.


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 12:20

Post #110 of 179 (3349 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Ken,
Lets keep this simple. Strength is good! There are lots of middle aged women doing multi sport. Middle aged women are at a higher risk of ostioparosis. Most of us have crashed on our bikes, what would happen if our bones were brittle? Lots of runners develop stress fractures, right? The best way to fight it is by strength training. This is common knowledge.


klehner

Feb 3, 11 12:46

Post #111 of 179 (3334 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

What a crappy article. First they set up a strawman argument against strength training for triathletes, then they set about dismantling it.

Here's what it comes down to: no part of triathlon is strength-limited. Period. That's common sense.

And your analogy of Costill's study to antibiotics is silly. Feel free to provide references to studies that refute Costill's study. And to cite national swim programs as evidence that triathletes should strength train is silly, too: when triathletes put in 100,000 yards per week and have maxed out their technique and swim fitness, then they, too, can strength train for that last .1% gain.

Why don't you try this question: why are the best track cycling pursuiters, who only have to go some 4-5 minutes, built like road cyclists (in fact, they usually are road cyclists) and not like track sprinters? After all, the track sprinters are the strongest cyclists in the world and can put out the greatest power.
----------------------------------
Of course, with your ears stuffed with outrage cotton balls, all you heard was, rahrahra, govt comes to get your guns, rhahrahrah, stamp out your FREEEEEDOM! - slowguy


gbot

Feb 3, 11 12:57

Post #112 of 179 (3323 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
Ken,
Lets keep this simple. Strength is good! There are lots of middle aged women doing multi sport. Middle aged women are at a higher risk of ostioparosis. Most of us have crashed on our bikes, what would happen if our bones were brittle? Lots of runners develop stress fractures, right? The best way to fight it is by strength training. This is common knowledge.

The typical demographic of slowtwitch readers and posters isn't dominated by middle aged women (although there are likely a bunch).

Strength training is great for a lot of stuff that has nothing to do with going fast in triathlon. This is a typical strawman used by the pro strength training types on ST.

"You guys say strength training isn't good, but it IS good for W, X, and Y"

The reality of the situation is that everyone realizes that strength training is great for W, X and Y but it has very little bearing on Z (where Z is going fast in endurance sport events).


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 12:59

Post #113 of 179 (3320 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Ken what are your thoughts on strength training from an injury prevention stand point. I have never nor will I say that strength alone will lead someone to there best at any sport. Just part of the package. If you understand physiology of the body you would understand. Also are Olympic Tri team members all have a lifting program.


M~

Feb 3, 11 13:02

Post #114 of 179 (3316 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
Ken what are your thoughts on strength training from an injury prevention stand point. I have never nor will I say that strength alone will lead someone to there best at any sport. Just part of the package. If you understand physiology of the body you would understand. Also are Olympic Tri team members all have a lifting program.

Man I wish Paulo weren't so busy nowadays....


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 13:04

Post #115 of 179 (3314 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [gbot] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

If 35-50 is middle aged enough, I know of 30 of my friends and family on ST. Half being female. I am 1 person


Physiojoe925

Feb 3, 11 13:06

Post #116 of 179 (3312 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [rugbysecondrow] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

rugbysecondrow wrote:
2nd, goals of the athlete. I am a 225# clyde who does alright, but is looking for improvement, combine that with the fact I have 2 small kids and busy work schedule that involves travel I need to fit it all in. CFE helps me work it all in. Will I be faster, I don't know. Will I be slower, I doubt it.
If you are that busy, how does it help you "work it all in?" Seems to me you must be cutting out some running or biking to make time for CFE.


3rd, I think many people in the SBR camp are anti anything new. In my limited experience, they are a pretty crowd following in they mindset and so I am not surprised they do not respond well to this. I also think they are intimidated by the strength and conditioning as this is very new to many who might not have that sort of background.
Let me rephrase this for you: "many people in the SBR camp are anti anything not supported by real scientific studies." How close minded!

4th, the arguement that CFE trains you for CFE and not for triathlons...huh? I do mainly Sprints with some Olympic and Exterra distances events. Most events have areas of hills, gap closing, recovery, technical etc...CFE has many intervals that train in sport specifc chosen ways (swim bike and run) that help power, speed, recovery, sustained effort.
You've never sat in on a freshman exercise physiology class, have you? The first ten minutes will teach you the principle of specificity. This means, if you want to get better at something, you must do that something alot. Doing activity A to get better at activity B is not the most effective way. In the end, people are just making it harder on themselves. Training precisely and scientifically has made me much faster on less training hours than I ever have been.

Lastly, don't take what I say as gospel.
Don't worry.

-Physiojoe



Tapeworm

Feb 3, 11 13:11

Post #117 of 179 (3305 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
...Lots of runners develop stress fractures, right? The best way to fight it is by strength training. This is common knowledge...


Amazing what "common knowledge" gets wrong on a regular basis.

Actually impact sports provide more skeletal strain and hence better at stimulating growth and strength in bones. Stress fractures occur not through a lack of "strength" but over-use. A lack of muscular endurance surrounding the calves and shins may help reduce the incidence of stress fractures (one of the argument for barefoot or minimalist running).

Weight training does improve bone density but no-where as much as impact sports.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19197207


(This post was edited by Tapeworm on Feb 3, 11 13:22)


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 13:11

Post #118 of 179 (3305 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [gbot] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Strength is good for certain things. Correct a few people don't understand that. Only CF instructors will tell you that CF alone will make you a good multi sport participant. I have just said that in my opinion its a must. In general stronger muscles mean more power. But if someones power to weight ratio doesn't add up, they will still be slow.


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 13:17

Post #119 of 179 (3295 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [Tapeworm] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

I can only tale you that to be false. My wife is a DPT and has ascess to Pubmed, I don't. When she gets home I will link it. Runners have more lower leg stress fractures then any other populations. The research shows that 2-5 miles a week is beneficial to bone strengthening. Because most of us go beyond that, the free raticals actually start to degrade bone strength.


klehner

Feb 3, 11 13:17

Post #120 of 179 (3295 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
Ken what are your thoughts on strength training from an injury prevention stand point. I have never nor will I say that strength alone will lead someone to there best at any sport. Just part of the package. If you understand physiology of the body you would understand. Also are Olympic Tri team members all have a lifting program.

My thoughts are that more injuries are caused by strength training than are prevented by strength training.

I think you don't understand physiology...and triathletes that read this forum.
----------------------------------
Of course, with your ears stuffed with outrage cotton balls, all you heard was, rahrahra, govt comes to get your guns, rhahrahrah, stamp out your FREEEEEDOM! - slowguy


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 13:19

Post #121 of 179 (3291 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [klehner] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Well apparently my PHD is worth nothing. And I am a Tri geek. CF workouts and that type do cause more injuries. If you read my post you will see I have stated that.


D1TRAINER

Feb 3, 11 13:23

Post #122 of 179 (3278 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [Physiojoe925] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

Joe- I agree.


klehner

Feb 3, 11 13:25

Post #123 of 179 (3271 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
Well apparently my PHD is worth nothing. And I am a Tri geek. CF workouts and that type do cause more injuries. If you read my post you will see I have stated that.

Your Ph.D. might very well be worth a whole bunch. It's just not apparent in this thread.
----------------------------------
Of course, with your ears stuffed with outrage cotton balls, all you heard was, rahrahra, govt comes to get your guns, rhahrahrah, stamp out your FREEEEEDOM! - slowguy


gbot

Feb 3, 11 13:25

Post #124 of 179 (3270 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
I can only tale you that to be false. My wife is a DPT and has ascess to Pubmed, I don't. When she gets home I will link it. Runners have more lower leg stress fractures then any other populations. The research shows that 2-5 miles a week is beneficial to bone strengthening. Because most of us go beyond that, the free raticals actually start to degrade bone strength.

That's because they're runners. I bet if you compared ex-runners to sedentary types, the sedentary types would get more stress fractures.


JollyRogers

Feb 3, 11 13:26

Post #125 of 179 (3267 views)
Re: Crossfit/Crossfit Endurance- Triathlete article = fishy? [D1TRAINER] [In reply to] Quote | Reply

D1TRAINER wrote:
In general stronger muscles mean more power.

Power without duration is meaningless.

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Draft legal AG Sprint WC
The ITU has just announced that starting 2016 its age group Sprint WC will be draft legal. Do you welcome this change?
Yes, but never for Oly distance
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No
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