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Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"?
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So I have no idea what it is or what is going on, but on my long runs my right eardrum goes all wonky on me.
I can hear my breathing really loud and if I'm talking I hear my voice super loud in my head. it is almost like having water in your ears but 10x the volume.
After I stop running my hearing gos back to normal in a flash, if i start again it comes back just as fast.

Any thoughts? Has this happened to anybody else?

It's T'war like 'car'
This is your life, and it's ending one minute at a time. - Fight Club
Cervelo | Focus
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Re: Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"? [Ti T'war] [ In reply to ]
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I ruptured an eardrum attempting a backroll wakeboarding... Went to an ENT dr (ear-nose-throat), who saw the tear, prescribed some in-ear antibiotics (tastes aweful as it runs through your ear, into your nose, and down the throat!). Wouldn't recommend this, but you could pinch your nose and pressurize your ears (equalizing pressure). If air runs through it, I'd get it checked out to make sure you aren't making it worse with swims, and would require surgery. Mine luckily didn't and healed on its own.
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Re: Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"? [Ti T'war] [ In reply to ]
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Do other noises (external) also seem loud?

Autophonia . . . I'm googling like mad.
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Re: Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"? [Ti T'war] [ In reply to ]
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I love google.

Patulous eustachion tube.
from:http://medicine.yale.edu/...seases/patulous.aspx

A patulous Eustachian tube (PET) is another type of ETD which, though clinically less common, nevertheless results in symptoms which can be quite bothersome to the afflicted patient. This condition entails a Eustachian tube that is abnormally open, in some cases all or nearly all of the time, in other cases during periods of heavy respiration. General symptoms of PET include autophonia (hearing one’s own voice as abnormally loud), hyperacusis (hearing sounds in general as abnormally loud), and, less commonly, distortion to speech and to sounds in general. These symptoms may initially suggest a problem in the inner part of the ear and thus PET is often not recognized by the examiner.

Conditions which tend to be associated with PET include pregnancy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, fatigue, stress, and weight loss. Additionally, anecdotal evidence suggests that some patients only experience symptoms or have an increase in symptoms during humid weather and especially during increased respiration in humid conditions (i.e. aerobic exercise in high humidity).
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Re: Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"? [Ti T'war] [ In reply to ]
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Could very well be "Exercise-Induced Eustachian Tube Dysfunction"

As long as it goes away when you stop running, don't sweat it.

Seeing your Dr would probably be a better thing to do, though :)
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Re: Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"? [Danielg] [ In reply to ]
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Here's a write up about it

http://forums.webmd.com/.eec0d1d
This is not as uncommon as you think....You may have Exercise-Induced ETD (Eustachian Tube Dysfunction)

Exercise increases blood supply to all parts of the body. Along with this increased proliferation of blood, comes tissue engorgement...this is why your skin becomes red or flushed. When the tissue engorgement is around your eustachian tubes -- those tiny ventilation tubes that run from your middle ear space (the area on the other side of your eardrum) to the back of your throat -- it may cause the tubes to temporarily malfunction.

If the eustachian tubes clog, your ears may feel full and stuffy, your hearing could be a bit muffled, like they need to "pop". If the e-tubes lock in the "open" position (they are normally closed and only open briefly when we swallow), you may hear your own voice or an echo.

As long as this exercise-induced eustachian tube dysfunction resolves after you cool down, there may be no need to be concerned.

Since you are having other issues involving your ears, there may be other things going on, too...so, please keep working with the ENT until this mystery is solved.
(From the Ear, Nose & Throat: Rod Moser, PA, PhD)
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Re: Can someone explain "Eardrum Blowout"? [Danielg] [ In reply to ]
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Holy cow, thanks guys. At least I'm not crazy and this is an actual thing. Come to think of it it does happen more when it is humid.

Thanks again.

It's T'war like 'car'
This is your life, and it's ending one minute at a time. - Fight Club
Cervelo | Focus
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