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Training a new cat
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OK, I realise you can't really train a cat like you can a dog, but how do you teach a kitten not to use their claws so much?

We just acquired an oldish kitten (about 6 months), he's settling in well, using the litter tray, very friendly and affectionate. But he treats us all as human pin cushions. Also on a few occasions has gently bitten hands - nowhere near enough to break the skin, but not a habit I want to encourage. I know most cats use their claws a little bit, he just seems very excessive compared to other cats I've known. Taking him to the vet tomorrow for some injections, may also see about getting his claws trimmed a bit as they do seem extremely long.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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You’re supposed to say “No” and walk away when the teeth/claw use becomes too much. I didn’t though, when our cat was a kitten, because kittens are too cute to be mean to. This resulted in my hands looking lacerated for a while...

It takes them a while to figure out how to control their claws, IIRC.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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Spray bottle with water.

Or get a dedicated scratch post. They never really stop scratching. It's what they do.
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Re: Training a new cat [jw13] [ In reply to ]
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Yup, got him a lovely scratching post, doesn't seem to use it. I'll try the water spray and the walking away
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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Trim their nails, scratch pads, and scratch posts. And a loud "no" and spray bottle. One of ours will still scratch despite numerous pads around the house. When she is persistent, we know it's time for a nail trim.
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Re: Training a new cat [tigermilk] [ In reply to ]
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Do you trim their nails yourself or go to a vet? It's bad enough trimming the children's nails, not sure I fancy doing the cat as well!
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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Saw something like these on a cat in a home I was shooting not too long ago. Homeowner said she has her vet put the plastic nails (soft covers) over the nails to stop scratching. They last about 3-4 months.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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cartsman wrote:
Do you trim their nails yourself or go to a vet? It's bad enough trimming the children's nails, not sure I fancy doing the cat as well!

I can't imagine needing to go to the vet to trim claws. You'd have to go to the vet and pay them about once a month or so. That's ridiculous. If you start when they're young, and get them used to you touching their paws, you should be able to trim their claws with minimal drama. I trim the claws for my current cat, and for the previous one, I did the plastic caps on her claws for awhile, also with no drama.

Slowguy

(insert pithy phrase here...)
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Re: Training a new cat [EndlessH2O] [ In reply to ]
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I'm guessing that's a house cat or does it go outside? Ours is house bound for now until he gets to know us better, but intent is definitely to let him roam outside once he knows where home is.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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Trimming claws is easy. Use human clippers and don't bother with the special ones. Just don't cut into the quick (pink park) or you will have bloody paw prints all over the house.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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cartsman wrote:
I'm guessing that's a house cat or does it go outside? Ours is house bound for now until he gets to know us better, but intent is definitely to let him roam outside once he knows where home is.

I asked the same thing and the homeowner said the cat was 100% indoor.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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So you are training a bird killer.

Life is full of froth and trouble, two things stand in stone
Kindness in another's troubles, courage in one's own
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Re: Training a new cat [len] [ In reply to ]
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I'm not training him to kill birds, he'll have to figure that out on his own.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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cartsman wrote:
I'm guessing that's a house cat or does it go outside? Ours is house bound for now until he gets to know us better, but intent is definitely to let him roam outside once he knows where home is.

If you're going to let him outside, dno't trim his claws when you do. He will need them.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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We take the dedicated scratching post and rub it with catnip, and then stretch the cat's front claws onto the post daily. It can take a few days to associate indoor scratching to that post but it does seem to work. Outside the cat will find a convenient root or use a front door mat.
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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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Re: Training a new cat [EndlessH2O] [ In reply to ]
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I use SoftPaws on my cat. It doesn't require a vet to apply them. Its not super fun and I've ended up with cat hair glued to my fingers more than once, but it doesn't take long to get them all on. They grow out faster than 3 months though. 6 weeks is probably good for a switch out. Keeps my puppy from losing an eye.

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Awww, Katy's not all THAT evil. Only slightly evil. In a good way. - JasoninHalifax

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Re: Training a new cat [cartsman] [ In reply to ]
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That cat wants to play.

Give it something to play with that isn’t one of your body parts. It will eventually associate your body as a petting and feeding thing and its toys as things to rip into.

If you try to “stop” it from clawing you without a substitute object to focus its murderous instincts it will end up shitting in the shower, pissing in your bed, barfing in your shoes and scratching your eyeballs out when you go to sleep.

It will also bring in rodents alive instead of dead and then sit back and enjoy watching you run around the house trying to catch a rat.

Don’t trim its nails. That’s just humiliating to the cat.

Get it something to stratch so it can sharpen it’s claws naturally, like a new leather couch or your girlfriend.

A cat is like a great and mighty river. You cannot stop its flow. You can only redirect it.

Also...


You don’t train cat. Cat train you.

”look, duffy is a great lover. the best!” -

slowman (owner of slowtwitch.com) 10/01/17
Last edited by: Duffy: Oct 14, 17 6:51
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