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Rachel was a trailblazer
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Rachel Dolezal was a trailblazer

http://www.wtsp.com/...s-filipino/491290902

'Transracial' man born white feels like he is Filipino

00:00
01:40

Garin Flowers introduces you to Ja Du, a man who is living a trans-racial life.
Garin Flowers, WTSP 6:14 AM. EST November 13, 2017

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TAMPA, Fla. -- Riding in a flamboyant purple vehicle, Ja Du shows up to a coffee shop to open up about his new identity.
Ja Du, born a white male named Adam, now considers himself a Filipino. Turns out the purple ride he drives around in is called a Tuk Tuk, an Asian-derived vehicle used for public transit in the Philippines he says.
Ja Du is part of a small, but growing community of people who considers themselves transracial. It refers to someone born one race, but identifies with another.
Sound weird? Not to them. Ja Du says he grew up enjoying Filipino food, events and the overall culture.
Living life as a transracial
“Whenever I’m around the music, around the food, I feel like I’m in my own skin,” he said.
“I’d watch the history channel sometimes for hours you know whenever it came to that and you know nothing else intrigued me more but things about Filipino culture.”
If you’re thinking this sounds familiar, you might remember the story of Rachel Dolezal. Dolezal was born white, but identified as black and portrayed herself as such. She was even the president of the Spokane, Washington, chapter of the NAACP.
After she appeared on an episode of Dr. Phil, the term transracial started to become more widely known. Now, we are finding out this community of people who identify as another race is growing. If you look on Facebook, where we found Ja Du, groups dubbed transracial are popping up with dozens of members.
Standpoint from a psychologist
Dr. Stacey Scheckner is a licensed psychologist with a B.A. from Washington University, plus M.A. and doctorate from Florida State. She hasn’t had a client who wanted to change their race but has worked with many clients wanting to change their body in some way.
Dr. Stacey Scheckner on being trans-racial
“If someone feels that they feel at home with a certain religion, a certain race, a certain culture, I think that if that’s who they really feel inside life is about finding out who you are. The more knowledge you have of yourself, the happier you can be,” she said.
“And, as long as it’s not hurting yourself or anyone else, I don’t see a problem with that.”
Ja Du hasn’t told his family yet because he believes they will laugh at the notion of changing your ethnicity. The public was very critical of Dolezal and might be for him as well, but Scheckner believes everyone should be more understanding.
“If that’s who they are and they want to celebrate it and enjoy it, then you have to think what harm is it doing? All they want to do is throw themselves into that culture and celebrate it.”
“I think before we get offended, we need to take a step back and think about what is the harm.”
But, with someone making such drastic changes, she does think they should speak to a professional.
“I work with a lot, in my 15 years, a lot of transgender people. Before the doctors that I send them to do any type of physical changes to their body, they go through a long process with me and actually most the people, they are not upset about it because they want to make sure that they’re doing the right thing.”
That brings up another major change with Ja Du. He is also transsexual and is considering changing his gender as well. He has spoken to his mom and family about that.
Preventing fraud
Your race can make you more marketable and in some cases eligible for certain benefits, jobs and scholarships. After quick Google search for ethnic scholarships, we found that a Filipino scholarship was the second option that popped up.
When Ja du knew he wanted to be transracial
Many might question Ja Du’s intentions or say that he is a perfect case of cultural appropriation.
He knows this can be a problem, but says he’s not trying to take advantage of anything.
“I believe people will [take advantage] just like other people have taken advantage of their identity to get their way, but the difference between me and them Garin is that I don’t want that. I think that we all have the freedoms to pursue happiness in our own ways,” he said.
More about transracial
The term was normally used to describe someone (or a couple) of a certain race adopting a baby of another race. But, now after the story of Rachel Dolezal, it’s becoming associated with someone who identifies with another ethnicity or race.
If you Google the term now, you will find plenty of stories and information referring to both definitions for the term.
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Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
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Quote:
Ja Du hasn’t told his family yet because he believes they will laugh at the notion of changing your ethnicity.

Yup. They will.

How does Danny Hart sit down with balls that big?
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
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I asked a Filipino friend at work if Ja Du means something in Filipino.

Quote:
It means "Dumb Ass white dude just wants attention."

How does Danny Hart sit down with balls that big?
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BLeP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaB5AVNg14c



"Are you sure we're going fast enough?" - Emil Zatopek
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
BCtriguy1 wrote:
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?


Because that would be cultural appropriation.

You cis-racial people are so quick to criticize what you clearly don't understand.
Last edited by: eb: Nov 13, 17 13:20
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Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Go Pound Sand wrote:
Rachel Dolezal was a trailblazer

http://www.wtsp.com/...s-filipino/491290902

'Transracial' man born white feels like he is Filipino

00:00
01:40

Garin Flowers introduces you to Ja Du, a man who is living a trans-racial life.
Garin Flowers, WTSP 6:14 AM. EST November 13, 2017

[/url][/url][/url][/url]


CONNECT TWEET[/url] PINTEREST[/url]
TAMPA, Fla. -- Riding in a flamboyant purple vehicle, Ja Du shows up to a coffee shop to open up about his new identity.
Ja Du, born a white male named Adam, now considers himself a Filipino. Turns out the purple ride he drives around in is called a Tuk Tuk, an Asian-derived vehicle used for public transit in the Philippines he says.
Ja Du is part of a small, but growing community of people who considers themselves transracial. It refers to someone born one race, but identifies with another.
Sound weird? Not to them. Ja Du says he grew up enjoying Filipino food, events and the overall culture.
Living life as a transracial
“Whenever I’m around the music, around the food, I feel like I’m in my own skin,” he said.
“I’d watch the history channel sometimes for hours you know whenever it came to that and you know nothing else intrigued me more but things about Filipino culture.”
If you’re thinking this sounds familiar, you might remember the story of Rachel Dolezal. Dolezal was born white, but identified as black and portrayed herself as such. She was even the president of the Spokane, Washington, chapter of the NAACP.
After she appeared on an episode of Dr. Phil, the term transracial started to become more widely known. Now, we are finding out this community of people who identify as another race is growing. If you look on Facebook, where we found Ja Du, groups dubbed transracial are popping up with dozens of members.
Standpoint from a psychologist
Dr. Stacey Scheckner is a licensed psychologist with a B.A. from Washington University, plus M.A. and doctorate from Florida State. She hasn’t had a client who wanted to change their race but has worked with many clients wanting to change their body in some way.
Dr. Stacey Scheckner on being trans-racial
“If someone feels that they feel at home with a certain religion, a certain race, a certain culture, I think that if that’s who they really feel inside life is about finding out who you are. The more knowledge you have of yourself, the happier you can be,” she said.
“And, as long as it’s not hurting yourself or anyone else, I don’t see a problem with that.”
Ja Du hasn’t told his family yet because he believes they will laugh at the notion of changing your ethnicity. The public was very critical of Dolezal and might be for him as well, but Scheckner believes everyone should be more understanding.
“If that’s who they are and they want to celebrate it and enjoy it, then you have to think what harm is it doing? All they want to do is throw themselves into that culture and celebrate it.”
“I think before we get offended, we need to take a step back and think about what is the harm.”
But, with someone making such drastic changes, she does think they should speak to a professional.
“I work with a lot, in my 15 years, a lot of transgender people. Before the doctors that I send them to do any type of physical changes to their body, they go through a long process with me and actually most the people, they are not upset about it because they want to make sure that they’re doing the right thing.”
That brings up another major change with Ja Du. He is also transsexual and is considering changing his gender as well. He has spoken to his mom and family about that.
Preventing fraud
Your race can make you more marketable and in some cases eligible for certain benefits, jobs and scholarships. After quick Google search for ethnic scholarships, we found that a Filipino scholarship was the second option that popped up.
When Ja du knew he wanted to be transracial
Many might question Ja Du’s intentions or say that he is a perfect case of cultural appropriation.
He knows this can be a problem, but says he’s not trying to take advantage of anything.
“I believe people will [take advantage] just like other people have taken advantage of their identity to get their way, but the difference between me and them Garin is that I don’t want that. I think that we all have the freedoms to pursue happiness in our own ways,” he said.
More about transracial
The term was normally used to describe someone (or a couple) of a certain race adopting a baby of another race. But, now after the story of Rachel Dolezal, it’s becoming associated with someone who identifies with another ethnicity or race.
If you Google the term now, you will find plenty of stories and information referring to both definitions for the term.

We are so hosed as a society... ;-)
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
BCtriguy1 wrote:
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?

Have you seen the commercials for the genetic testing to find out your "ancestry"?
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Bloody fucking hell, what a damn idiot. He can celebrate and love the culture and think it’s cool without thinking he’s automatically one of them and a part of it.

My birth grandfather was from Mexico, making me 25% Mexican. I don’t look anything like a Mexican, save for the short, sturdy stature and monobrow. I was never connected to that family, but I did study in Mexico for a semester. By all logic, this probably gives me more right to call myself Mexican than this guy has to call himself Filipino. But I don’t. Why? Because I’m no more Mexican than I am German (my other 75%). And I’m also not fucking Belgian, even though I celebrate Belgium through the food I eat and the dedication I have to riding my bike in stupid weather conditions. This guy is a dumbass.

But I’ll take exception with you for one thing. Dolezal wasn’t the trailblazer. That was Navin from The Jerk.



Go Pound Sand wrote:
Rachel Dolezal was a trailblazer

http://www.wtsp.com/...s-filipino/491290902

'Transracial' man born white feels like he is Filipino

00:00
01:40

Garin Flowers introduces you to Ja Du, a man who is living a trans-racial life.
Garin Flowers, WTSP 6:14 AM. EST November 13, 2017

[/url][/url][/url][/url]


CONNECT TWEET[/url] PINTEREST[/url]
TAMPA, Fla. -- Riding in a flamboyant purple vehicle, Ja Du shows up to a coffee shop to open up about his new identity.
Ja Du, born a white male named Adam, now considers himself a Filipino. Turns out the purple ride he drives around in is called a Tuk Tuk, an Asian-derived vehicle used for public transit in the Philippines he says.
Ja Du is part of a small, but growing community of people who considers themselves transracial. It refers to someone born one race, but identifies with another.
Sound weird? Not to them. Ja Du says he grew up enjoying Filipino food, events and the overall culture.
Living life as a transracial
“Whenever I’m around the music, around the food, I feel like I’m in my own skin,” he said.
“I’d watch the history channel sometimes for hours you know whenever it came to that and you know nothing else intrigued me more but things about Filipino culture.”
If you’re thinking this sounds familiar, you might remember the story of Rachel Dolezal. Dolezal was born white, but identified as black and portrayed herself as such. She was even the president of the Spokane, Washington, chapter of the NAACP.
After she appeared on an episode of Dr. Phil, the term transracial started to become more widely known. Now, we are finding out this community of people who identify as another race is growing. If you look on Facebook, where we found Ja Du, groups dubbed transracial are popping up with dozens of members.
Standpoint from a psychologist
Dr. Stacey Scheckner is a licensed psychologist with a B.A. from Washington University, plus M.A. and doctorate from Florida State. She hasn’t had a client who wanted to change their race but has worked with many clients wanting to change their body in some way.
Dr. Stacey Scheckner on being trans-racial
“If someone feels that they feel at home with a certain religion, a certain race, a certain culture, I think that if that’s who they really feel inside life is about finding out who you are. The more knowledge you have of yourself, the happier you can be,” she said.
“And, as long as it’s not hurting yourself or anyone else, I don’t see a problem with that.”
Ja Du hasn’t told his family yet because he believes they will laugh at the notion of changing your ethnicity. The public was very critical of Dolezal and might be for him as well, but Scheckner believes everyone should be more understanding.
“If that’s who they are and they want to celebrate it and enjoy it, then you have to think what harm is it doing? All they want to do is throw themselves into that culture and celebrate it.”
“I think before we get offended, we need to take a step back and think about what is the harm.”
But, with someone making such drastic changes, she does think they should speak to a professional.
“I work with a lot, in my 15 years, a lot of transgender people. Before the doctors that I send them to do any type of physical changes to their body, they go through a long process with me and actually most the people, they are not upset about it because they want to make sure that they’re doing the right thing.”
That brings up another major change with Ja Du. He is also transsexual and is considering changing his gender as well. He has spoken to his mom and family about that.
Preventing fraud
Your race can make you more marketable and in some cases eligible for certain benefits, jobs and scholarships. After quick Google search for ethnic scholarships, we found that a Filipino scholarship was the second option that popped up.
When Ja du knew he wanted to be transracial
Many might question Ja Du’s intentions or say that he is a perfect case of cultural appropriation.
He knows this can be a problem, but says he’s not trying to take advantage of anything.
“I believe people will [take advantage] just like other people have taken advantage of their identity to get their way, but the difference between me and them Garin is that I don’t want that. I think that we all have the freedoms to pursue happiness in our own ways,” he said.
More about transracial
The term was normally used to describe someone (or a couple) of a certain race adopting a baby of another race. But, now after the story of Rachel Dolezal, it’s becoming associated with someone who identifies with another ethnicity or race.
If you Google the term now, you will find plenty of stories and information referring to both definitions for the term.
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [eb] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
eb wrote:
BCtriguy1 wrote:
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?


Because that would be cultural appropriation.

You cis-racial people are so quick to criticize what you clearly don't understand.


fify
Last edited by: Madduck: Nov 13, 17 15:19
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Madduck] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Madduck wrote:
eb wrote:
BCtriguy1 wrote:
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?


Because that would be cultural appropriation.

You cis-racial people are so quick to criticize what you clearly don't understand.


fify

Why add pink? Clearly he was joking. Way to ruin a good joke.

How does Danny Hart sit down with balls that big?
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BLeP] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
BLeP wrote:
Madduck wrote:
eb wrote:
BCtriguy1 wrote:
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?


Because that would be cultural appropriation.

You cis-racial people are so quick to criticize what you clearly don't understand.


fify


Why add pink? Clearly he was joking. Way to ruin a good joke.

in this room...sometimes it's a lil tough to tell.
sorry if i ruined it, i'm one of the slow ones i reckon.
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [MidwestRoadie] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I had tacos tonight, so I'm now going to identify as Mexican. Good recall on The Jerk. I wish I would have remembered.



MidwestRoadie wrote:
Bloody fucking hell, what a damn idiot. He can celebrate and love the culture and think it’s cool without thinking he’s automatically one of them and a part of it.

My birth grandfather was from Mexico, making me 25% Mexican. I don’t look anything like a Mexican, save for the short, sturdy stature and monobrow. I was never connected to that family, but I did study in Mexico for a semester. By all logic, this probably gives me more right to call myself Mexican than this guy has to call himself Filipino. But I don’t. Why? Because I’m no more Mexican than I am German (my other 75%). And I’m also not fucking Belgian, even though I celebrate Belgium through the food I eat and the dedication I have to riding my bike in stupid weather conditions. This guy is a dumbass.

But I’ll take exception with you for one thing. Dolezal wasn’t the trailblazer. That was Navin from The Jerk.



]
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Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [MidwestRoadie] [ In reply to ]
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Truly brilliant The Jerk reference. That's another movie I need to watch with my kids!

--------------------------
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Rudy Project, ask me about 50% off
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Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
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Last night I had perogies & pork cutlets. So I guess I'm eastern European for the day. #youAreTheEthnicityYouEat
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Ja Du, born a white male named Adam, now considers himself a Filipino. Turns out the purple ride he drives around in is called a Tuk Tuk, an Asian-derived vehicle used for public transit in the Philippines he says.


Adam needs to learn a little more about the Philippines if he wants to be Filipino. A Tuk Tuk is more closely associated with Thailand. If he really wants to be Filipino, he should be calling his purple ride a Jeepney.


P.S - I can read and speak Thai and use the handle "Sanuk" (a very English version of the word meaning fun in Thai) so from now on I will consider myself Thai.


Khap Khun Krap.

You're such a Trump ball washer! - Duffy - Feb 8, 17 13:18
Last edited by: Sanuk: Nov 14, 17 6:44
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Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Sanuk] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I thought Sanuk had a different meaning, related to the word fun, but more about the value in achieving personal satisfaction?
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
BCtriguy1 wrote:
I thought Sanuk had a different meaning, related to the word fun, but more about the value in achieving personal satisfaction?

Ewwww.
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Isn't Thorazine intended for head cases like this?

_____________________
Fester from Detroit, Mi
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [rick_pcfl] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
rick_pcfl wrote:
BCtriguy1 wrote:
I thought Sanuk had a different meaning, related to the word fun, but more about the value in achieving personal satisfaction?

Ewwww.

Basically, his screen name means "to masturbate with great exuberance". I'm like 90% sure.
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
I thought Sanuk had a different meaning, related to the word fun, but more about the value in achieving personal satisfaction?

In Thailand it means more than what we would call fun. It has more cultural meaning and often used when you are with friends. Here we would say we had fun, meaning people laughed and had a good time. There, it would be more like people were non-argumentative and at peace and enjoyed each other's company.

Lots of things in Thailand relate to the concept of fun which is far more encompassing than what we would consider.


You're such a Trump ball washer! - Duffy - Feb 8, 17 13:18
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Sanuk] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Sanuk wrote:
Ja Du, born a white male named Adam, now considers himself a Filipino. Turns out the purple ride he drives around in is called a Tuk Tuk, an Asian-derived vehicle used for public transit in the Philippines he says.


Adam needs to learn a little more about the Philippines if he wants to be Filipino. A Tuk Tuk is more closely associated with Thailand. If he really wants to be Filipino, he should be calling his purple ride a Jeepney.


P.S - I can read and speak Thai and use the handle "Sanuk" (a very English version of the word meaning fun in Thai) so from now on I will consider myself Thai.


Khap Khun Krap.

Adam needs to down a couple of baluts before he can call himself Filipino.
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [axlsix3] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Adam needs to down a couple of baluts before he can call himself Filipino.

That's why I'll stick to Thai. I ate fried insects but not balut.


You're such a Trump ball washer! - Duffy - Feb 8, 17 13:18
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [Sanuk] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
Quote:
Khap Khun Krap

Make that extra spicy with a side of lemongrass soup, and I'm a happy guy.

"Canada is like a lofty apartment over a really great party" Robin Williams
Quote Reply
Re: Rachel was a trailblazer [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
Quote | Reply
BCtriguy1 wrote:
Why can't one just enjoy the food, culture, language etc of their choosing without going through this bizarre mental conversion and coming out process?

For the same reason we can't admit that religion is made up. Dunking yourself in water. Circumcision? Drinking the blood of Christ??? For God's sake, we're lucky we don't see more of this bizarre stuff.

"If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca
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