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Distressed Furniture
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Can anyone explain why this is a thing? I can understand trying to give new furniture some character, but almost everything I see makes me think the furniture store was attacked by a bunch of termites and vandals.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [torrey] [ In reply to ]
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All the women in my life are into "vintage". It's bullshit. They buy garbage at high prices because they seem to hold the past. It's just another thing on the huge pile of proof that we are a nation of infants crying for the past.

Don't even get me started on the automobile unrestored barn find.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [torrey] [ In reply to ]
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I don't get this trend...My wife throws out old furniture so she can pay a lot of (my) money for furniture that looks old.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
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Not just old but like either it was attacked by a rabid badger or a toddler with a sharpie
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Re: Distressed Furniture [torrey] [ In reply to ]
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As a fine furniture builder I HATE this trend. I can do it is a client wants, but I will only lightly distress.
That said I am looking incorporating some reclaimed wood into my line, since that is a big trend.
I also don't totally mind some of the refinishing in milk or chalk paints, but this is something any average person could do. The prices charged are crazy, and I have often seen pieces still in need of structural repair.
Ok, will take some deep breaths now.

Jim
"In dog beers, I've only had one"
http://www.shakercolonial.com/
Creating custom made furnishing to your requirements
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Re: Distressed Furniture [jriosa] [ In reply to ]
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A few years ago I did some work to our old shitty kitchen table. It was one of those super glossy finger jointed pine looking tables that everyone buys when they are younger. I made a new top out of cherry, lightly distressed it, spent days blending various lee valley water borne dyes to get a colour I loved, then lacquered the top. The distressing was in the form of fake worm holes, smacking some areas with chains, and leaving some rough re-sawing marks in areas. I was worried the lacquer over the distressing would look wrong but it didn't at all.

I kept the old legs, and used a few different layers of milk paint in various colours, the top coat being a creamy off white. I then sanding through the the cream in a few corners and high wear areas revealing some light blue paint and other colours beneath that. It turned out really nice and we get tons of comments on it, despite the fact that I was cursing my wife the whole time I was making it.

I agree though, it is crazy that some people are buying, say, a used rocking chair at a garage sale for $20, painting it with milk paint, then selling it for $400.

By the way... I bought a Festool track saw :-D.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
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Quote:
I bought a Festool track saw

Wow. Tell us more please. (I said Fein the other day, but I was thinking Festool when I was trolling you Canadians about trucks.).
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Re: Distressed Furniture [BCtriguy1] [ In reply to ]
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I like scrub planes for distressing.
As to festool, you are an assholes with too much money and I am jealous. (Not really, I want a mikra sander more than festool, but same. price)
Also, try Moser aniline dyes for color work. Better selection than lv. You can also do alcohol work without grain raising.
And your milk paint work runs to what I would do, so you have taste.

Jim
"In dog beers, I've only had one"
http://www.shakercolonial.com/
Creating custom made furnishing to your requirements
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Re: Distressed Furniture [Go Pound Sand] [ In reply to ]
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Go Pound Sand wrote:
I don't get this trend...My wife throws out old furniture so she can pay a lot of (my) money for furniture that looks old.

Have you considered the use of the word "no"?

******************************
If I don't, who will? -Me
It's like being bipolar in opinion is a requirement around here. -TripleThreat
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Re: Distressed Furniture [jriosa] [ In reply to ]
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When furniture is hand built then the builder can choose the individual pieces of wood that work to give the piece character so there should be even less need for distressing.

When it is produced in a factory, it is going to come out with less personality. Having a machine try to add personality by mimicking a cat in heat doesn't solve the problem.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [jriosa] [ In reply to ]
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jriosa wrote:
I like scrub planes for distressing.
As to festool, you are an assholes with too much money and I am jealous. (Not really, I want a mikra sander more than festool, but same. price)
Also, try Moser aniline dyes for color work. Better selection than lv. You can also do alcohol work without grain raising.
And your milk paint work runs to what I would do, so you have taste.


Correction: I'm an asshole with too much credit card debt!

I had instant buyers remorse... until I used it. Now all I can do is think of new uses for it. I think it will be a big time saver, and will make me money in the long run. I'm most looking forward to using it at home. I don't have a shop big enough to have a cabinet saw, or even my contractor table saw, with enough space to rip and cross cut full sheets, so, this puppy means I can comfortably break down sheet goods, with minimal dust, using far less space. It gives my shop a whole different level of versatility.

I'll check out the Moser dyes, thanks for the tips!

ETA: First use for the track saw was cutting down pre-finished, 1 3/4" oak doors. Zero splinters, barely any sanding needed, looks like it was cut with a laser beam. Barely a whisp of dust left over. I was very impressed.
Last edited by: BCtriguy1: Aug 9, 17 7:46
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Re: Distressed Furniture [torrey] [ In reply to ]
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I have young children so most of my furniture is distressed.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [Perseus] [ In reply to ]
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I have young children so most of my furniture is distressed.

My golden retriever does a great job on our couch. I'm ready to sell it for big money.


You're such a Trump ball washer! - Duffy - Feb 8, 17 13:18
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Re: Distressed Furniture [Perseus] [ In reply to ]
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Go on Facebook and post it for sale as vintage. The idiots will line up to pay 4 times the price you paid.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [jriosa] [ In reply to ]
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jriosa wrote:
As a fine furniture builder I HATE this trend. I can do it is a client wants, but I will only lightly distress.
That said I am looking incorporating some reclaimed wood into my line, since that is a big trend.
I also don't totally mind some of the refinishing in milk or chalk paints, but this is something any average person could do. The prices charged are crazy, and I have often seen pieces still in need of structural repair.
Ok, will take some deep breaths now.

Some of the most awesome stuff I've seen lately is recycling old warehouse beams from way back when they had an unfettered supply of original old-growth timber, none of this modern engineered fiber/veneer shit. We're talking individual sticks over 3' wide and 30-40' long before being cut down, beautiful straight grain.
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Re: Distressed Furniture [lunchbox] [ In reply to ]
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lunchbox wrote:
Go Pound Sand wrote:
I don't get this trend...My wife throws out old furniture so she can pay a lot of (my) money for furniture that looks old.


Have you considered the use of the word "no"?

Are you married?
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Re: Distressed Furniture [OneGoodLeg] [ In reply to ]
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I renovated an 1875 farmhouse. In one room I thought I could find a panel joint I could pull from the floor so I could ruin new wiring. 35" off the floor.
And believe me, cutting a 150 year old pine is tough.
I love that stuff. Out here in Montana 12x12 beams are as big as it gets.

Jim
"In dog beers, I've only had one"
http://www.shakercolonial.com/
Creating custom made furnishing to your requirements
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Re: Distressed Furniture [OneGoodLeg] [ In reply to ]
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OneGoodLeg wrote:
jriosa wrote:
As a fine furniture builder I HATE this trend. I can do it is a client wants, but I will only lightly distress.
That said I am looking incorporating some reclaimed wood into my line, since that is a big trend.
I also don't totally mind some of the refinishing in milk or chalk paints, but this is something any average person could do. The prices charged are crazy, and I have often seen pieces still in need of structural repair.
Ok, will take some deep breaths now.

Some of the most awesome stuff I've seen lately is recycling old warehouse beams from way back when they had an unfettered supply of original old-growth timber, none of this modern engineered fiber/veneer shit. We're talking individual sticks over 3' wide and 30-40' long before being cut down, beautiful straight grain.

A year or so ago I salvaged a 10' long, 8x8 old growth douglas fir beam from a 100 year old house. Just waiting to turn it in to our new fireplace mantle.
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