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Bike suggestion for my next purchase
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Hello Gurus,
I got my self fitted at the very last IM70.3 pre-race forum at Monterrey Mexico last May 2017 by the gentle Dan "Slowman" Empfield.
As per his measurements, my numbers are as follow:
a. Saddle height: 690 (w/165 mm crank)
b. Pad elevation: 100 mm
c. PAD X(R): 385
d. PAD X(C): 425
e. PAD Y: 590

I would appreciate your suggestions on which bike (brand/model) should I get me on my next purchase.

Cheers,
Jorge
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Re: Bike suggestion for my next purchase [buki_cardoza] [ In reply to ]
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there are a few ways we can go about this. one is to simply use a pad x/y calculator. either pad x rear or pad x center is used, and both are needed because, depending on the bike company, each is used. so to get the ball rolling:

let's start with what you're NOT. here is a detail from the scott plasma prescriber.



you'll see that this bike - which is a fabulous bike but has a fit range that's on the rather narrow side, because of the (lack of massive) front end adjustability - doesn't present to you a fit solution. it's gauged to pad-center, so your pad x (ctr) of 425mm is not quite achievable on this bike. it's 20mm too long. you could do it. if you were a pro and you had to ride it, either the pads will ride 20mm further up your forearm or we'd fashion you a plate between the armrest cup and the cradle, or we'd drill some new holes in the cradle, or we'd choose a different cradle, something like that.

here's a detail from the EXTRA SMALL size of the trek speed concept. see how your 590/425 pad y/x numbers intersect at a solution?



you're a size XS, that's a "mid-far" stem, 35mm pedestal. do you want to know why there are about 8000 or 9000 posts on the speed concept owners thread? do you want to know why so many speed concepts were sold? and why so many were sold on that thread? because this is how easy it is to find a speed concept solution on a bike that has an extremely adjustable front end. (carl matson, "carl" on the forum, formerly an engineer at trek, walked people through this many, many times on that owners thread).

here's the funny thing: there's not THAT much difference in the frame geometries of these two bikes above. it is the front end adjustability that makes one bike easy to fit and another not so easy.

we can use these pad x/y numbers of yours to fit you to any tri bike, pretty much, and that means either superbikes or mortal bikes (that take standard stems). can you either narrow down your list by brand or model, or by price range?


Dan Empfield
aka Slowman
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Re: Bike suggestion for my next purchase [buki_cardoza] [ In reply to ]
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I have a lot of questions. First were you measured in the morning or the evening.Second you have a history of injury. A third what you wanna do with the bike. I'm assuming tri's are we talking, short course, Olympic distance. Kona. I wanna know what you will actually do. I wanna know your technical skills. I want to know if you shooting for a podium. What are we doing UCI set
up or I T U. If I wanna know do we have medical waiver. So you're picking a bike and if I were selling it to you I don't have half the information I need plus you got actually get on it and see if you like the way it steers the fit is one thing the ride characteristics are a whole other flavor . you are talking wedding we haven't had a first date.
Last edited by: Happy: Jun 15, 17 14:09
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Re: Bike suggestion for my next purchase [Happy] [ In reply to ]
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for the purposes of this particular exercise, i think we can assume this rider is physically sound. this is for no-draft racing. the exercise - while only covering a snippet of the fit process (you're right, happy!) - is just one of math: based on hx/hy what are the bikes that will work.


Dan Empfield
aka Slowman
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